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I have a question considering a program that stimulates a stack (not using any built-in stack features or such).

stack2= 1 2 3 4 5 //single dimension array of 5 elements

By calling the method pop the stack should look like the following, basically taking an element off each time the stack is being called up again.

stack2= 1 2 3 4 0  
stack2= 1 2 3 0 0  
stack2= 1 2 0 0 0  
stack2= 1 0 0 0 0  
stack2= 0 0 0 0 0

Here is my code:

for (int i = 1; i <= 6; i++)
{
    number= TryPop(s2);
    //use number
    ShowStack(s2, "s2");
}

public void Push(int g)
{
    if (top == Max)
    {
        throw new Exception("Stack overflow...");
    }
    else
    {
        tabel[top] = g;
        top++;
    }
}/*Push*/

I already have code that fills my array with values (through a push method). The pop method should take the last value and place it on 0, then calls up the next stack and place the following on 0 (like shown above in stack2).

The current pop method that keeps track of the top index (0 elements = 0 top, 1 element = 1 top etc..) already includes an underflow warning if this goes on 0 or below (which is correct).

public int Pop()
{
    if(top <= 0)
    {
        throw new Exception("Stack underflow...");
    }
    else
    {
        for (int j = tabel.Length - 1; j >= 0; j--)  
        {
            //...Really not sure what to do here.
        }
    }

    return number; 

}/*Pop*/

Since in the other class I already have a loop (for loop shown above) that simulates 6 times the s2 stack. (first stack: 1 2 3 4 0, second stack 1 2 3 0 0 and so on.) How exactly do I take an element off each time? Either I have the entire display on 0 or the 0 in the wrong places / out of index errors.

Edit: Working Pop method:

public int Pop()
{
    if(top <= 0)
    {
        throw new Exception("Stack underflow...");
    }

    top--;
    tabel[top] = 0;
    number = tabel[top];

    return number;
}/*Pop*/
share|improve this question
    
Can you show us your Push implementation? Why do you think do you need a loop in the Pop method? –  dtb Apr 11 '10 at 14:40
    
When using top to Pop, watch out for off-by-one errors, since it's indexed one element past the top item on the stack –  Dan Bryant Apr 11 '10 at 14:58
    
Is this due tomorrow? –  used2could Apr 11 '10 at 15:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To implement a stack, you need an array and a "pointer" to the top of the stack.

empty       _ _ _ _ _
            ↑

In your code, table is the array and top is the pointer (as array index).

Push

To push an item to a stack, put the item at top of the stack and advance the pointer by one:

push 1      1 _ _ _ _
              ↑

push 2      1 2 _ _ _
                ↑

push 3      1 2 3 _ _
                  ↑

That's what your code already does:

table[top] = g;    // insert `g` at `top` into `table`
top++;             // advance `top` by one

Pop

To pop an item, move the pointer back by one and return+erase the item at the top:

pop 3       1 2 _ _ _
                ↑

pop 2       1 _ _ _ _
              ↑

pop 1       _ _ _ _ _
            ↑

Now try to translate your solution for Push to do the reverse as shown here!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for excellent usage of the character. –  Mark Byers Apr 11 '10 at 15:00
    
Cheers for the well drawed illustration. The thing is i fail to adress because my Push is a void method. Where my pop has to be a int with a single return type. The push value uses a specifiek number to push on it, but how exactly do i call upon this value(index)? table[top] = // everything results in out of index. –  Sef Apr 11 '10 at 15:07
    
@Sef: Please focus on this: "Move the pointer back by one and return the item at the top". Can you try to implement this and post your solution? –  dtb Apr 11 '10 at 15:23
    
+1 excellent example! –  used2could Apr 11 '10 at 15:29
    
Cheers for all the input!. Placed the code in the op at the bottom. My problem was i was placing the top-- in the wrong order, resulting in out of index errors all the time. Perhaps another small question. I had to use a stringbuider to be able to show me the desired results (else i get the class name and thats it). Is there any other way exept for the stringbuilder to acheive this? Have not really seen this, and perhaps i should not have used this already. Anyway thanks a bunch, very much apperciated! –  Sef Apr 11 '10 at 15:35

You should declare a local variable result and set it to the current value of the top of the stack, using top as an index into your data. Then decrement your top variable and return result. Since it is homework I won't post the code - you should try to implement it yourself to make sure that you understand it.

There is no need to loop to implement Pop. There is also no need to zero values as you remove them, although you can do this if you wish.

You should also note that this implementation is not thread-safe. That is OK, but make sure that this is clearly documented.

share|improve this answer

You should not be using a for loop in Pop(). You are only removing one element, and you know the location of that element (it's at index top), so you need only deal with that element of the stack.

share|improve this answer

Assuming that top references the top of the stack, setting the value at the top of your stack to 0 and decrementing the top should be sufficient.

public int Pop()
{
    if(top < 0)
    {
        throw new Exception("Stack underflow...");
    }
    else
    {
        table[top] = 0;
        top--;
    }

    // not sure where number comes from
    return number; 

}/*Pop*/
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, Yes the top shows how many items there are currently in the stack (top 5 for a full stack of 5 elements). Although every time i try anything (also with the code above) i get out of index errors. Cheers. –  Sef Apr 11 '10 at 14:49
    
@Sef, you probably have to post your complete code then. Your top might be pointing out of the array. Assuming that your stack is an array of 5 integers, top is valid if it's 0 (first element) to 4 (last element). Anything otherwise will throw out of bounds exceptions. –  Mr Roys Apr 11 '10 at 14:59

I'm sure i'm going to get flamed for giving him the answer but i know what i would want if i were in his shoes on a Sunday. I hope dtb's answer gets the most upvotes because it deserves it for an excellent explanation of a stack!

Here is a basic example of a stack. Please learn it. don't just paste it in your homework.

public class Stack<T>
{
    public int Count { get; private set; }
    private int _CurrentPosition;
    private T[] _Values;

    public Stack(int capacity)
    {
        _CurrentPosition = -1;
        _Values = new T[capacity];
        Count = capacity;
    }

    public T Peek()
    {
        if (_CurrentPosition < 0)
            return default(T);

        return _Values[_CurrentPosition];
    }

    public void Push(T item)
    {
        if (_CurrentPosition == Count)
            throw new Exception("Stack overflow...");

        _CurrentPosition++;
        _Values[_CurrentPosition] = item;
    }

    public T Pop()
    {
        if(_CurrentPosition < 0)
            throw new Exception("Stack underflow...");
        T item = _Values[_CurrentPosition];
        _Values[_CurrentPosition] = default(T);
        _CurrentPosition--;
        return item;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
<generic flame for posting full solution to homework question>. Please remove it. –  dtb Apr 11 '10 at 15:20
    
We have to be sensitive to homework etiquette? God forbid he goes to another site that has code examples. LOL I Love the "<generic flame...>" –  used2could Apr 11 '10 at 15:23

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