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This problem is driving me crazy... Place N bishops on NxN board in a way, where all squares would be occupied or attacked with at least one of them.

Could anyone help me out with an algorithm for solving this problem?

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I'm sure somebody can help you out; where, exactly, are you stuck? – James McNellis Apr 11 '10 at 14:59
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Why not use backtracking? :-P – Vlad Apr 11 '10 at 14:59
    
Well... There is a similar problem with queens, but all you have to do with them is check if the queen currently being placed is placed on a legal square. But with bishops, do you have to be aware of empty squares throughout the whole algorithm? It's very inefficient, isn't it? As you need to "redraw" the board after placing/removing every bishop. – Cinnamon Apr 11 '10 at 15:21
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I think the problem you are referring to (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_queens_puzzle) states that the queens are not allowed to attack each other. The bishop problem as you have stated it doesn't have this constraint. – Mark Byers Apr 11 '10 at 15:38
    
Is this homework? – tom10 Apr 11 '10 at 17:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why backtrack? Use the small number of solutions to obtain a proof.

Even a greedy algorithm will suffice: Count the number of squares reachable from each square. Pick a square with the greatest reach that doesn't overlap with a previously picked reach. Repeat.

Ambiguity generates horizontal, vertical, and side-of-center variations.

N bishops is only enough to reach each square with exactly one bishop. If you picked squares with overlapping reach, the final tally of reachable squares would be lower. Hmm, maybe you need to quantify how much lower for any given bad square. Sounds doable.

For such a huge problem space, brute-force backtracking doesn't sound promising.

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I started writing this algorithm with backtracking... And I thought there is no better way. But I love your idea! I will try to implement it. But before that, "number of squares reachable" is, essentially, number of squares which can be attacked from a certain square, right? – Cinnamon Apr 11 '10 at 16:06
    
@Cinnamon: yep. – Potatoswatter Apr 11 '10 at 16:21
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The word "backtracking" suggests that the OP wants all the possible bishop arrangements. – Vlad Apr 11 '10 at 15:10
    
I know the solution. I need help with the algorithm. – Cinnamon Apr 11 '10 at 15:12
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@Cinnamon: The algorithm - 1) Choose any row or column. 2) Place bishops in every cell in this row or column. Seriously though, if this isn't what you want it would help if you added a little more detail to your question. Explain: what you want, how and why backtracking should be used, what you've tried, your code if any, and what problems you are having getting it working. – Mark Byers Apr 11 '10 at 15:22
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@Mark: They have to be in the center. – Potatoswatter Apr 11 '10 at 15:41
    
@Potatoswatter: Good point. I need one more step: 3) If your chosen row or column doesn't work, backtrack and try a new row/column. So now the algorithm also includes backtracking as requested. ;-) – Mark Byers Apr 11 '10 at 15:42

There is a minimum and a maximum solution for this problem it isn't as trivial.

Check this BishopsProblem or more detailed

I'm sure you will easily find an example in c.

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I couldn't find a single example in C. Only theory. – Cinnamon Apr 11 '10 at 15:24
    
@Cinnamon this (2nd listing) could be adopted compsci.ca/v3/viewtopic.php?t=21497 for bishops moves – stacker Apr 11 '10 at 15:37

I'm assuming you're asking for some optimizations, since the backtracking algorithm is what it is.

First thing to notice is that you can separate the black and white - you take the sum of B_i * W_j where i + j = N. You can also visualize the diagonals as a simple grid (with constraints) as it'll likely make the code tighter and maybe easier to understand. Another optimization is noticing that the color does not necessarily matter -- the results for some blacks can be used for some whites. Figure out when this happen and when it doesn't.

Hope this is a good enough boost -- should be sufficient for some smallish N's.

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