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My main solution is using code from a utility class library, that I wrote myself, but is a part from another solution. How can I set a breakpoint in the referenced DLL file?

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4 Answers 4

You can do one of the following:

  1. Add the DLL project to the solution containing your executable. Then you can set breakpoints as normal.
  2. You could instead just open the DLL project and use the Debug -> Attach to Process to attach to your running EXE
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(2) I find easy - just run two instances of Studio side by side. Ctrl-F5 on the 'primary' one to lauch wihtout the debugger attached, then attach to the process with the instance of studio that is editing the library project. –  Frep D-Oronge Sep 12 '11 at 13:54
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Frep D-Oronge, you should add that as an answer - it seems the easiest overall approach. –  Tim MB Sep 19 '12 at 11:58

Click Debug, New Breakpoint, Break at Function, then enter the full name of the function.

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I couldn't get this to work under VS2012 since it said it couldn't verify the function. It seemed to be able to find functions within the solution but not in referenced libraries. –  Sam Sep 8 '14 at 5:21
    
Ignore that warning and it should work anyway –  SLaks Sep 8 '14 at 16:52

Make sure you have the .pdb file in the bin/debug folder where the referenced class library dll resides. When you are debugging your current solution you should be able to step into the code from your class library. When you step into the class library you will be able to set breakpoints.

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Open the source file of your referenced dll that contains the desired method manually using menu

File > Open > File...

Then set the breakpoint by clicking on the left border in the code editor. This enables you to break at any code line and not just at function calls. Visual Studio shows the breakpoint in a kind of disabled state, because it thinks that the code is unreachable. Just ignore it; the breakpoint will become active once the code runs.

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