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I supposed the include-command copy-pastes code in the compilation, it is wrong because the code stopped working. Please, see the middle part in the code. I only copy-pasted the code to the file and added the include-command.

$ cat results/frames.tex
10.31 & 8.50 &  7.40 \\
10.34 & 8.53 &  7.81 \\
8.22 & 8.62 &  7.78 \\
10.16 & 8.53 &  7.44 \\
10.41 & 8.38 &  7.63 \\
10.38 & 8.57 &  8.03 \\
10.13 & 8.66 &  7.41 \\
8.50 & 8.60 &  7.15 \\
10.41 & 8.63 &  7.21 \\
8.53 & 8.53 &  7.12 \\

Latex code, see the middle part

\begin{table}
        \begin{tabular}{ | l | m | r |}
        \hline
        $t$ / s & $d_{1}$ / s & $d_{2}$ / s \\
        $\Delta h = 0,01 s$ & $\Delta d = 0,01 s$ & $\Delta d = 0,01 s$ \\
        \hline
        % I JUST COPIED THE CODE from here to the file, included.
        % It stopped working, why?
        \include{results/frames.tex}
        \hline
        $\pi (\frac{d_{1}}{2} - \frac{d_{2}}{2})$ & $2 \pi R h$ & $2 \pi r h$ \\
        \hline
        \end{tabular}
\end{table}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use \input instead of \include, that will work.

\include additionally performs a \clearpage command which will not work in the context of a table.

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You mean Include-command is an input command boxed with the clearpage-command? –  hhh Apr 11 '10 at 20:32
1  
The definition of \input looks (effectively) like: \clearpage\input{#1}\clearpage. (The actual definition is more complex, but this shows the basic idea.) –  godbyk Apr 11 '10 at 20:38
2  
There are other differences: For example, \include opens an auxiliary file for every file included, so that you can build parts of the document using \includeonly and still get the references correct. \includes can't be nested, but \inputs can. In general, use \include for chapters in large documents, and \input otherwise. –  Philipp Apr 11 '10 at 20:40

Try with \input, \include is old and very limited..

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2  
\include is not older or worse than \input, it just serves a different purpose. –  Philipp Apr 11 '10 at 20:42
    
\input is a Tex primitive. \include is a Latex macro defined in terms of \input, and so is not as old. –  Charles Stewart Apr 12 '10 at 7:59

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