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The first print shows the member value to be false, and the other two prints show it as true. Why does the first output differ from the last two?

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class MyClass
{
public:
  bool value;
  bool stuff;
};

class Container
{
public:
  vector<MyClass> my_classes;
  Container()
  {
    MyClass c;
    cout << c.value << endl;
    my_classes.push_back(c);
  }
};

int main (int argc , char* argv[] )
{
  MyClass mc;
  cout << mc.value << endl;
  Container con;
  cout << con.my_classes[0].value << endl;
  return 0;
}
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1  
There seems to be a parser error, everything in <…> is missing, including everything after cout. –  Philipp Apr 11 '10 at 21:01
1  
Please do not attempt to format your code using HTML tags - use the 1010 button above the text entry area. –  anon Apr 11 '10 at 21:03
    
@ Philipp First time code formatting posting pains, sorry. –  anachoret Apr 11 '10 at 21:04
    
Are you missing a constructor for MyClass that initializes its fields? –  reuben Apr 11 '10 at 21:04
    
MyClass is using the default, compiler provided constructor, which I thought initialized primitive values consistently (usually to 0?). Maybe I'm thinking of Java. –  anachoret Apr 11 '10 at 21:12
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The two members are primitive (non-class) objects and thus uninitialized. That means that their values will be arbitrary at runtime. You must initialize them in the constructor:

class MyClass {
public:
  bool value;
  bool stuff;
  MyClass(): value(false), stuff(false) { }
};
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1  
Usually when the OS allocates a page for the first time it filled with zeros. So at first you see false. But once your code keeps on running the memory area of your stack no longer has those zeros and you see different results. Anyhow, it's all a matter of luck mostly. NEVER LEAVE ANY VARIABLE INITIALIZED (* Unless you know what you're doing) (** You probably don't :) –  Shiroko Apr 11 '10 at 21:24
1  
This MyClass(): value(), stuff() { } would have worked, too. (The default is to initialize bool to false.) –  sbi Apr 11 '10 at 21:33
2  
@Shiroko: Did you mean _un_initialized? –  sbi Apr 11 '10 at 21:34
1  
@anachoret: The compiler synthesizes the copy constructor and assignment operator if they aren't explicitly defined. In your example, the synthesized members are just fine. For more complex classes, you often have to declare or defined these members explicitly; sometimes the “Law of the Big Three” is helpful in that case. –  Philipp Apr 11 '10 at 21:49
1  
@sbi: Oops, forgot two letters. so what? :) –  Shiroko Apr 12 '10 at 15:03
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You are not initializing members to any value. They will just have any value that was in that place of memory before.

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Why does the first construction of MyClass and subsequent print inside of Container always initialize bools to false? –  anachoret Apr 11 '10 at 21:10
2  
it doesn't. it just happens that the piece of memory it's using happens to always contain that value. If you rearrange your program or add to it its likely that it will change –  jcoder Apr 11 '10 at 21:13
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The objects you are declaring in main(..) are automatic hence allocated on the stack of the running thread. Since you don't initialize the objects, they are simply filled with the data that was previously in this very part of the stack.

If you processor is of intel x86 architecture, the assembly language code for a typical function would look something like this (AT&T syntax)

pushl   %ebp 
movl    %esp, %ebp
subl    $LOCAL_VARIABLES_NUM * WORD_SIZE, %esp

...
<function code goes here>
<that is how we read variable values>
movl -4(%ebp), %ebx        
...

addl $LOCAL_VARIABLES_NUM * WORD_SIZE, %esp
popl %ebp

As you see, we simply add and substract the necessary number of bytes from the stack pointer, leaving the old data where it was.

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