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What is the difference between dependencyManagement and dependencies? I have seen the docs at Apache Maven web site. It seems that a dependency defined under the dependencyManagement can be used in it's child modules without specifying the version.

For example:

A parent project (Pro-par) defines a dependency under the dependencyManagement:

<dependencyManagement>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
      <version>3.8</version>
    </dependency>
 </dependencies>
</dependencyManagement>

Then in the child of Pro-par, I can use the junit :

  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
    </dependency>
 </dependencies>

However I wonder if it is necessary to define junit in the parent pom? Why not define it directly in the needed module?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 99 down vote accepted

Dependency Management allows to consolidate and centralize the management of dependency versions without adding dependencies which are inherited by all children. This is especially useful when you have a set of projects (i.e. more than one) that inherits a common parent.

Another extremely important use case of dependencyManagement is the control of versions of artifacts used in transitive dependencies. This is hard to explain without an example. Luckily, this is illustrated in the documentation.

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5  
So, its need to declare dependencies in child project pom's anyway even if they declared in parent project's pom at <dependencyManagement> section? Is it possible to make some kind of inheritance of dependencies? –  psed Aug 23 '12 at 9:38
6  
Yes, you still need to define them in the child POM to show that you are using them. They are not actually included in the child projects just because they are in <dependencyManagement> in the parent POM. Enclosing dependencies in <dependencyManagement> centralizes management of the version, scope, and exclusions for each dependency, if and when you decide to use it. Maven's guide to dependency management gets into all the details. –  hotshot309 Sep 13 '12 at 16:27
    
@chAmi Actually the answer by Pascal was posted two years earlier than the one you are referencing to, see the date of that post mestachs.wordpress.com/?s=Maven+Best+Practices) –  informatik01 Jun 13 at 10:49
1  
seems i got it wrong @informatik01 thanks for pointing it out. deleted my comment. –  chAmi Jun 15 at 13:56
    
@chAmi It's ok, you're welcome. –  informatik01 Jun 15 at 16:00

It's like you said; dependencyManagementis used to pull all the dependency information into a common POM file, simplifying the references in the child POM file.

It becomes useful when you have multiple attributes that you don't want to retype in under multiple children projects.

Finally, dependencyManagement can be used to define a standard version of an artifact to use across multiple projects.

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So, dependencies does not inherited? Its need to be declared in child project's pom anyway? –  psed Aug 23 '12 at 9:39

In Eclipse there is one more feature in the dependencyManagement. When "dependencies"is used without it, the unfound dependencies are noticed in the pom file. If dependencyManagement is used, the unsolved dependencies remains unnoticed in pom and errors appears only in the java files. (imports and such...)

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If you have JUnit test cases defined in all child modules and you are using STS or eclipse then with just defining eclipse will give errors for test cases.

You need to add dependencies for junit outside tag in parent module, so that you don't get any errors for test cases in eclipse. Although maven will still compile without having this sort of tag

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If the dependency was defined in the top-level pom's dependencyManagement element, the child project did not have to explicitly list the version of the dependency. if the child project did define a version, it would override the version listed in the top-level POM’s dependencyManagement section. That is, the dependencyManagement version is only used when the child does not declare a version directly.

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