Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

What is the difference between dependencyManagement and dependencies? I have seen the docs at Apache Maven web site. It seems that a dependency defined under the dependencyManagement can be used in it's child modules without specifying the version.

For example:

A parent project (Pro-par) defines a dependency under the dependencyManagement:

<dependencyManagement>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
      <version>3.8</version>
    </dependency>
 </dependencies>
</dependencyManagement>

Then in the child of Pro-par, I can use the junit :

  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
    </dependency>
 </dependencies>

However I wonder if it is necessary to define junit in the parent pom? Why not define it directly in the needed module?

share|improve this question
up vote 202 down vote accepted

Dependency Management allows to consolidate and centralize the management of dependency versions without adding dependencies which are inherited by all children. This is especially useful when you have a set of projects (i.e. more than one) that inherits a common parent.

Another extremely important use case of dependencyManagement is the control of versions of artifacts used in transitive dependencies. This is hard to explain without an example. Luckily, this is illustrated in the documentation.

share|improve this answer
8  
So, its need to declare dependencies in child project pom's anyway even if they declared in parent project's pom at <dependencyManagement> section? Is it possible to make some kind of inheritance of dependencies? – psed Aug 23 '12 at 9:38
15  
Yes, you still need to define them in the child POM to show that you are using them. They are not actually included in the child projects just because they are in <dependencyManagement> in the parent POM. Enclosing dependencies in <dependencyManagement> centralizes management of the version, scope, and exclusions for each dependency, if and when you decide to use it. Maven's guide to dependency management gets into all the details. – hotshot309 Sep 13 '12 at 16:27
    
The second paragraph (dependencyManagement also controls transitive dependencies) is only true when the dependencies are explicitly set: stackoverflow.com/questions/28312975/… – rmetzger Nov 24 '15 at 10:30

It's like you said; dependencyManagementis used to pull all the dependency information into a common POM file, simplifying the references in the child POM file.

It becomes useful when you have multiple attributes that you don't want to retype in under multiple children projects.

Finally, dependencyManagement can be used to define a standard version of an artifact to use across multiple projects.

share|improve this answer
2  
So, dependencies does not inherited? Its need to be declared in child project's pom anyway? – psed Aug 23 '12 at 9:39
    
Yes, you need to declare them anyway in children projects, but without specifying a version. – Pavel Vlasov Jan 13 at 9:05

If the dependency was defined in the top-level pom's dependencyManagement element, the child project did not have to explicitly list the version of the dependency. if the child project did define a version, it would override the version listed in the top-level POM’s dependencyManagement section. That is, the dependencyManagement version is only used when the child does not declare a version directly.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe this statement may not be correct. In Maven's Dependency Management examples (#2), they say that dependencies defined in a parent pom with a version, will override the version specified in the child pom: "When maven is run on project B version 1.0 of artifacts a, b, c, and d will be used regardless of the version specified in their pom." – devdanke Feb 25 '15 at 19:10
    
@devdanke At least, Eclipse m2e issues a warning: Overriding managed version ... for .... – Gerold Broser Apr 21 at 11:04

The documentation on the Maven site is horrible. What dependencyManagement does is simply move your dependency definitions (version, exclusions, etc) up to the parent pom, then in the child poms you just have to put the groupId and artifactId. That's it (except for parent pom chaining and the like, but that's not really complicated either - dependencyManagement wins out over dependencies at the parent level - but if have a question about that or imports, the Maven documentation is a little better).

After reading all of the 'a', 'b', 'c' garbage on the Maven site and getting confused, I re-wrote their example. So if you had 2 projects (proj1 and proj2) which share a common dependency (betaShared) you could move that dependency up to the parent pom. While you are at it, you can also move up any other dependencies (alpha and charlie) but only if it makes sense for your project. So for the situation outlined in the prior sentences, here is the solution with dependencyManagement in the parent pom:

----- ParentProj pom -----
<project>
  <dependencyManagement>
    <dependencies>
      <dependency> <!-- not much benefit defining alpha here, as we only use in 1 child, so optional -->
        <groupId>alpha</groupId>
        <artifactId>alpha</artifactId>
        <version>1.0</version>
        <exclusions>
          <exclusion>
            <groupId>zebra</groupId>
            <artifactId>zebra</artifactId>
          </exclusion>
        </exclusions>
      </dependency>
      <dependency>
        <groupId>charlie</groupId> <!-- not much benefit defining charlie here, so optional -->
        <artifactId>charlie</artifactId>
        <version>1.0</version>
        <type>war</type>
        <scope>runtime</scope>
      </dependency>
      <dependency> <!-- defining betaShared here makes a lot of sense -->
        <groupId>betaShared</groupId>
        <artifactId>betaShared</artifactId>
        <version>1.0</version>
        <type>bar</type>
        <scope>runtime</scope>
      </dependency>
    </dependencies>
  </dependencyManagement>
</project>

----- Child Proj1 pom -----
<project>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>alpha</groupId>
      <artifactId>alpha</artifactId>  <!-- jar type IS DEFAULT, so no need to specify in child projects -->
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>betaShared</groupId>
      <artifactId>betaShared</artifactId>
      <type>bar</type> <!-- This is not a jar dependency, so we must specify type. -->
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>
</project>

----- Child Proj2  -----
<project>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>charlie</groupId>
      <artifactId>charlie</artifactId>
      <type>war</type> <!-- This is not a jar dependency, so we must specify type. -->
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>betaShared</groupId> 
      <artifactId>betaShared</artifactId> 
      <type>bar</type> <!-- This is not a jar dependency, so we must specify type. -->
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>
</project>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for an alternate example :-) – devdanke Apr 25 at 20:14
    
Somewhat off-topic question: what does dependency type "bar" mean? I saw in an example pom on the Maven documentation but couldn't find a definition. I assumed it was a typo of "war" or "jar", but I see it in other examples such as yours. – NobodyMan May 12 at 4:16
    
NobodyMan - So it is just a placeholder for another archive type. Like using 'foo'. Or it could be used if someone made a custom type with the extension 'bar'. And there are plenty of obscure archive types out there. Like sar, which is jboss service archive. – MattC May 13 at 18:47

I'm fashionably late to this question, but I think it's worth a clearer response than the accepted one (which is correct, but doesn't emphasize the actual important part, which you need to deduce yourself).

In the parent POM, the main difference between the <dependencies> and <dependencyManagement> is this:

Artifacts specified in the <dependencies> section will ALWAYS be included as a dependency of the child module(s).

Artifacts specified in the <dependencyManagement> section, will only be included in the child module if they were also specified in the <dependencies> section of the child module itself. Why is it good you ask? because you specify the version and/or scope in the parent, and you can leave them out when specifying the dependencies in the child POM. This can help you use unified versions for dependencies for child modules, without specifying the version in each child module.

share|improve this answer

In Eclipse there is one more feature in the dependencyManagement. When "dependencies"is used without it, the unfound dependencies are noticed in the pom file. If dependencyManagement is used, the unsolved dependencies remains unnoticed in pom and errors appears only in the java files. (imports and such...)

share|improve this answer

If you have JUnit test cases defined in all child modules and you are using STS or eclipse then with just defining eclipse will give errors for test cases.

You need to add dependencies for junit outside tag in parent module, so that you don't get any errors for test cases in eclipse. Although maven will still compile without having this sort of tag

share|improve this answer
    
what kind of reply is this, makes me to just laugh! – CuriousMind Jul 6 at 7:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.