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If i have the following markup;

<div id="container">
  <div id="box">
    <div id='sameHeight'>One<br>two<br>three</div>
    <div id='sameHeight'>four</div>
    <div id='sameHeight'>five</div>        
  <div>
  <div id="box">
    <div id='sameHeight'>four</div>
    <div id='sameHeight'>six</div>
    <div id='sameHeight'>seven<br>eight</div>
  <div>
</div>

How can I ensure that all divs marked as "sameHeight" are the same height as their counterparts in the other div?

I had a look at the equalHeights plugin but that assumes all divs side by side are in the same parent. I need one that can either traverse parents or allow me to specify parents.

Is there such a thing or do I need to write it?

EDIT

I seem to have caused some confusion in my explanation so I hope this clears things up a little.

Looking at the new markup, the container is a simple box.

The "box" divs sit side by side.

Each sameheight div then sits one under the other within its parent.

The thing i'm trying to solve is to have each of the sameHeights that match to it's opposite side the same height.

it should look like a grid i guess w/out using a grid.

I hope this helps.

EDIT 2

This is so far what I have come up with but is there a better way?

function SetHeights() {
    var numLines = $('#container>div:eq(0) .sameHeight').length;

    for (var t = 0; t < numLines; t++) {
        var leftHeight = $('#container>div:eq(0) .sameHeight:eq(' + t + ')').outerHeight();
        var rightHeight = $('#container>div:eq(1) .sameHeight:eq(' + t + ')').outerHeight();

        if (leftHeight > rightHeight) {
            $('#container>div:eq(1) .sameHeight:eq(' + t + ')').css({ height: leftHeight });
        }
        else {
            $('#container>div:eq(0) .sameHeight:eq(' + t + ')').css({ height: rightHeight });
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
So, you want all #box to be the same height? –  alex Apr 12 '10 at 4:57
    
on a per row basis yeah –  griegs Apr 12 '10 at 4:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Firstly, you are probably aware only one element should have any one id attribute. So I have changed the selectors as if they were classes to classes below. Even though you may not give a care about W3C standards, browsers or JavaScript API, etc may rely on this behaviour and not work now or in the future.

   $(document).ready(function () {    
        $('div.parentDiv > div').each(function() {

        var $sameHeightChildren = $(this).find('.sameHeight');
        var maxHeight = 0;

        $sameHeightChildren.each(function() {
            maxHeight = Math.max(maxHeight, $(this).outerHeight());
        });

        $sameHeightChildren.css({ height: maxHeight + 'px' });


    });
});

Note: If you want them all to be the same height despite their parent div, this is what you want.

$(document).ready(function () {    
        var $sameHeightDivs = $('.sameHeight');
        var maxHeight = 0;
        $sameHeightDivs.each(function() {

            maxHeight = Math.max(maxHeight, $(this).outerHeight());

        });

        $sameHeightDivs.css({ height: maxHeight + 'px' });
});

This will set them to all be the height of the tallest, per parent div element.

Also, this answer may show you some other options.

Note too that if the content inside changes again (perhaps via JavaScript), you will need to call this again, or put it in a setInterval() which I do not recommend.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, this is the way to do it in JQuery but you could do it simply in CSS by setting the height of the child divs to 100% –  AjayP Apr 12 '10 at 4:16
    
@AjayP You can not actually. This is the whole equal heights problem in CSS, and where the table people have it easy :P –  alex Apr 12 '10 at 4:21
    
... I mean without a fixed height of course. The comment to the answer by Sumit Sharma says "I can't assume a height". –  alex Apr 12 '10 at 4:22
    
Really I always thought 100% would work I've never had to do this though. –  AjayP Apr 12 '10 at 4:24
    
Well maybe I'm wrong. Show it to me working on www.jsbin.com and I'll eat my words :) –  alex Apr 12 '10 at 4:25
<div id='parentDiv'>
  <div>
      <div id='sameHeight'>One<br>two<br>three</div>
      <div id='sameHeight'>four</div>
      <div id='sameHeight'>five</div>        
  <div>
  <div>
      <div id='sameHeight'>four</div>
      <div id='sameHeight'>six</div>
      <div id='sameHeight'>seven<br>eight</div>
  <div>
</div>

and in JavaScript using jQuery write :

$(document).ready(function () {    
    $("div.parentDiv div div.sameHeight").css({ height: "100px" });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thanks but I sould mention that I can't assume a height. Each 'sameHeight' may be different and so i need to set the height of each to that of the highest one in that line. –  griegs Apr 12 '10 at 4:11

Why not just use a table?

Imho, doing layout in javascript like this is far more evil than doing the layout via tables. What happens if the user resizes their browser? You have to capture the resize event, but then you get a certain laggyness when resizing that makes your website look unpolished.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree somewhat with this. However, I wouldn't use a table, just cheat with the margin-bottom: -1000px; padding-bottom: 1000px; overflow: hidden; trick. –  alex Apr 12 '10 at 6:13
2  
Because you can't develop a responsive site with tables. alex's trick is also somewhat limited because any border or shadow will be at 1000px and not on the screen where you want it. –  cdonner Dec 26 '13 at 19:16

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