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Using the variables extension, I want to change the background color of a cell in a table. So far I've done this:

{{#vardefine:green|<span style="background:Green; color:White">text</span>}}

The problem is that, when I add {{#var:green}} to the cell, only the text itself has a green background. Ideally, I want the whole cell to have a background color, like it does if I use this:

| bgcolor="#ff00ff" | test

or this

| style="background:silver" |silver

in the cell.

Does anyone know how to solve this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The answer was provided on the mwusers forum.

Essentially I need to:

  1. Create Template:! - which contains only | (see it on Wikipedia)

  2. Define the variables, e.g.:

    {{#vardefine: sample1 | bgcolor=green{{!}}Test}}

  3. Enter this in a cell:

    {{#var:sample1}}

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Please see also this wiki Q&A forum in start up phase: area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/13716/wiki-edit –  Wikis Jul 18 '10 at 17:32

That's simply not going to work. I presume your table row looks like this:

 | Not in span {{#var:green|Text}}

That means you're defining a span within the cell, not defining the color of the cell itself.

 | Not in span <span style="background:Green; color:White">Text</span>

Cell styles have to go before the content:

 | bgcolor="green" | Now it's all green

Instead, why not tag the row with a CSS class called 'green' and then define that in your Wiki CSS? See Help:Table#Style classes.

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I assume you mean in "MediaWiki:Common.css" I'd rather not because that is a global page that affects every user. My assumption is that it will (if I add enough of these things) slow down wiki response. Is that correct? –  Wikis Apr 21 '10 at 13:04
    
Quite the contrary, CSS styling is probably much faster than custom variable processing and the overhead of an additional span in every cell. –  jpatokal Apr 21 '10 at 23:06
    
Thanks for that, jpatokal! –  Wikis Apr 23 '10 at 8:36

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