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When using log4j, the Logger.log(Priority p, Object message) method is available and can be used to log a message at a log level determined at runtime. We're using this fact and this tip to redirect stderr to a logger at a specific log level.

slf4j doesn't have a generic log() method that I can find. Does that mean there's no way to implement the above?

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4  
It looks like there's some discussion of adding this to slf4j 2.0 on the dev mailing list: qos.ch/pipermail/slf4j-dev/2010-March/002865.html –  scompt.com Apr 12 '10 at 12:42
    
Posted an issue: bugzilla.slf4j.org/show_bug.cgi?id=206 –  ripper234 Nov 30 '10 at 6:44
    
take a look at Marker, this is custom data you can pass to log chain. –  tuxSlayer Jul 15 '13 at 11:43
    
@tuxSlayer can you please elaborate how to use Marker in this case? –  Miserable Variable Sep 5 '13 at 2:16
    
Probably its not the best idea for "logging" but you can use several markers for log entry "priority" (high|low|normal, info|warn|fatal) and use filtering in logback or custom appender to consume markers and drive log entries into separate channels (log info, email fatal etc). However, the more straight way is to have a facade for this as was pointed in answers below. –  tuxSlayer Sep 9 '13 at 10:06
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8 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There is no way to do this with slf4j.

I imagine that the reason that this functionality is missing is that it is next to impossible to construct a Level type for slf4j that can be efficiently mapped to the Level (or equivalent) type used in all of the possible logging implementations behind the facade. Alternatively, the designers decided that your use-case is too unusual to justify the overheads of supporting it.

UPDATE

Concerning @ripper234's use-case (unit testing), I think the pragmatic solution is modify the unit test(s) to hard-wire knowledge of what logging system is behind the slf4j facade ... when running the unt tests.

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There's no mapping necessary really. There are five levels already implicitly defined by the methods in org.slf4j.Logger: debug, error, info, trace, warn. –  scompt.com Apr 12 '10 at 12:45
11  
WTF? SLF4J is heralded as the future of java's logging, and this simply use case is not supported? (First thing I tried to do after integrating SLF4J... to help reduce the clutter in unit tests). –  ripper234 Nov 30 '10 at 6:34
3  
Posted this as an issue: bugzilla.slf4j.org/show_bug.cgi?id=206 –  ripper234 Nov 30 '10 at 6:43
1  
And the issues got closed as Invalid. As far as I understand this, it is a deliberate design choice. –  ripper234 Nov 30 '10 at 13:28
5  
@ripper234 - I don't think your bug addressed the same issue as scompt.com's original question. You asked about configuring the level of the underlying logging system via the SLF4J API. What scompt.com was after was a generic 'log' method in the SLF4J API, that takes the logging level of the message as a parameter. –  Richard Fearn May 25 '11 at 21:24
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I have just encountered a similar need. In my case, slf4j is configured with the java logging adapter (the jdk14 one). Using the following code snippet I have managed to change the debug level at runtime:

Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger("testing");
java.util.logging.Logger julLogger = java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger("testing");
julLogger.setLevel(java.util.logging.Level.FINE);
logger.debug("hello world");
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Anyone wanting a drop-in fully SLF4J compatible solution to this problem might want to check out Lidalia SLF4J Extensions - it's on Maven Central.

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Try switching to Logback and use

ch.qos.logback.classic.Logger rootLogger = (ch.qos.logback.classic.Logger)LoggerFactory.getLogger(ch.qos.logback.classic.Logger.ROOT_LOGGER_NAME);
rootLogger.setLevel(Level.toLevel("info")));

I believe this will be the only call to Logback and the rest of your code will remain unchanged. Logback uses SLF4J and the migration will be painless, just the xml config files will have to be changed.

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I was already using Logback-backed slf4j, and this instantly allowed me to clean up my unit tests. Thanks! –  Lambart Mar 18 at 23:51
    
-1 This is not what this question is about. –  jan Mar 28 at 10:54
    
This was my first -1, thanks. I believe you are wrong. Logback uses SLF4J, so the answer IS relevant. –  Alexandros Gelbessis Apr 2 at 8:18
1  
@AlexandrosGelbessis You should reread the question. It was asked for a method that could log programmatically one log message at any level. You are changing the level of the root logger for all messages, not only for one. –  jan Apr 3 at 7:16
    
+1 for jan, my apologies. –  Alexandros Gelbessis Apr 15 at 9:17
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using java introspection you can do it, for example:

private void changeRootLoggerLevel(int level) {

    if (logger instanceof org.slf4j.impl.Log4jLoggerAdapter) {
        try {
            Class loggerIntrospected = logger.getClass();
            Field fields[] = loggerIntrospected.getDeclaredFields();
            for (int i = 0; i < fields.length; i++) {
                String fieldName = fields[i].getName();
                if (fieldName.equals("logger")) {
                    fields[i].setAccessible(true);
                    org.apache.log4j.Logger loggerImpl = (org.apache.log4j.Logger) fields[i]
                            .get(logger);

                    if (level == DIAGNOSTIC_LEVEL) {
                        loggerImpl.setLevel(Level.DEBUG);
                    } else {
                        loggerImpl.setLevel(org.apache.log4j.Logger.getRootLogger().getLevel());
                    }

                    // fields[i].setAccessible(false);
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            org.apache.log4j.Logger.getLogger(LoggerSLF4JImpl.class).error("An error was thrown while changing the Logger level", e);
        }
    }

}
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This explicitly refers to log4j and not slf4j generically –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 13 '12 at 1:53
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Richard Fearn has the right idea, so I wrote up the full class based on his skeleton code. It's hopefully short enough to post here. Copy & paste for enjoyment. I should probably add some magic incantation, too: "This code is released to the public domain"

import org.slf4j.Logger;

public class LogLevel {

    /**
     * Allowed levels, as an enum. Import using "import [package].LogLevel.Level"
     * Every logging implementation has something like this except SLF4J.
     */

    public static enum Level {
        TRACE, DEBUG, INFO, WARN, ERROR
    }

    /**
     * This class cannot be instantiated, why would you want to?
     */

    private LogLevel() {
        // Unreachable
    }

    /**
     * Log at the specified level. If the "logger" is null, nothing is logged.
     * If the "level" is null, nothing is logged. If the "txt" is null,
     * behaviour depends on the SLF4J implementation.
     */

    public static void log(Logger logger, Level level, String txt) {
        if (logger != null && level != null) {
            switch (level) {
            case TRACE:
                logger.trace(txt);
                break;
            case DEBUG:
                logger.debug(txt);
                break;
            case INFO:
                logger.info(txt);
                break;
            case WARN:
                logger.warn(txt);
                break;
            case ERROR:
                logger.error(txt);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Log at the specified level. If the "logger" is null, nothing is logged.
     * If the "level" is null, nothing is logged. If the "format" or the "argArray"
     * are null, behaviour depends on the SLF4J-backing implementation.
     */

    public static void log(Logger logger, Level level, String format, Object[] argArray) {
        if (logger != null && level != null) {
            switch (level) {
            case TRACE:
                logger.trace(format, argArray);
                break;
            case DEBUG:
                logger.debug(format, argArray);
                break;
            case INFO:
                logger.info(format, argArray);
                break;
            case WARN:
                logger.warn(format, argArray);
                break;
            case ERROR:
                logger.error(format, argArray);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Log at the specified level, with a Throwable on top. If the "logger" is null,
     * nothing is logged. If the "level" is null, nothing is logged. If the "format" or
     * the "argArray" or the "throwable" are null, behaviour depends on the SLF4J-backing
     * implementation.
     */

    public static void log(Logger logger, Level level, String txt, Throwable throwable) {
        if (logger != null && level != null) {
            switch (level) {
            case TRACE:
                logger.trace(txt, throwable);
                break;
            case DEBUG:
                logger.debug(txt, throwable);
                break;
            case INFO:
                logger.info(txt, throwable);
                break;
            case WARN:
                logger.warn(txt, throwable);
                break;
            case ERROR:
                logger.error(txt, throwable);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Check whether a SLF4J logger is enabled for a certain loglevel. 
     * If the "logger" or the "level" is null, false is returned.
     */

    public static boolean isEnabledFor(Logger logger, Level level) {
        boolean res = false;
        if (logger != null && level != null) {
            switch (level) {
            case TRACE:
                res = logger.isTraceEnabled();
                break;
            case DEBUG:
                res = logger.isDebugEnabled();
                break;
            case INFO:
                res = logger.isInfoEnabled();
                break;
            case WARN:
                res = logger.isWarnEnabled();
                break;
            case ERROR:
                res = logger.isErrorEnabled();
                break;
            }
        }
        return res;
    }
}
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This would be easier to use with a variadic (Object...) args parameter. –  Anonymoose Jun 27 '12 at 21:54
    
Hmmm... yes. But on the other hand, you still would have to branch inside the method to call the correct "org.slf4j.Logger" method, trading runtime decisions for compile-time decisions. Worse, the program would have to construct the array to be passed to the variadic method "under the hood" (so to say), burning cycles and stressing the garbage collector out. That would not be nice as most calls would probably not result in actual logging anyway. –  David Tonhofer Dec 20 '13 at 17:16
    
"org.slf4j.Logger" has quite a few logging method signatures that are not handled in the above class, so an extension is probably warranted: slf4j.org/api/org/slf4j/Logger.html –  David Tonhofer Dec 20 '13 at 17:17
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This can be done with an enum and a helper method:

enum LogLevel {
    TRACE,
    DEBUG,
    INFO,
    WARN,
    ERROR,
}

public static void log(Logger logger, LogLevel level, String format, Object[] argArray) {
    switch (level) {
        case TRACE:
            logger.trace(format, argArray);
            break;
        case DEBUG:
            logger.debug(format, argArray);
            break;
        case INFO:
            logger.info(format, argArray);
            break;
        case WARN:
            logger.warn(format, argArray);
            break;
        case ERROR:
            logger.error(format, argArray);
            break;
    }
}

// example usage:
private static final Logger logger = ...
final LogLevel level = ...
log(logger, level, "Something bad happened", ...);

You could add other variants of log, say if you wanted generic equivalents of SLF4J's 1-parameter or 2-parameter warn/error/etc. methods.

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True, but slf4j purpose is not to have to write log wrappers. –  djjeck Jun 20 at 0:35
    
The purpose of SLF4J is to provide an abstraction for different logging frameworks. If that abstraction doesn't provide exactly what you need, you have no choice but to write a helper method. The only other alternative is to contribute a method like the one in my answer to the SLF4J project. –  Richard Fearn Jun 20 at 8:49
    
I agree, but in this case there are caveats, like that you wouldn't be able to provide file and line number anymore, unless you implemented yet another workaround for that. In this case I would have stuck with log4j, until the framework supported the feature - which eventually happened through an extension, see Robert Elliot's more recent answer. –  djjeck Jun 20 at 18:46
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no, it has a number of methods, info(), debug(), warn(), etc (this replaces the priority field)

have a look at http://www.slf4j.org/api/org/slf4j/Logger.html for the full Logger api.

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sorry, i see what you're asking now. no, there's no generic way to change log level at runtime, but you could easily implement a helper method with a switch statment. –  oedo Apr 12 '10 at 11:47
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