Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

With all the SDKs floating around, it's handy to be able to build for multiple SDKs and platforms. However, bouncing from 3.2 to 3.0 and even occasionally 2.x, I frequently get deprecated warnings involving methods that have changed or been superseded:

warning: 'UIKeyboardBoundsUserInfoKey' is deprecated.

Since I still want to maintain compatibility with older OSes, and I'm also striving to remove 'noise' when building, is there a way to turn off or disable these warnings?

share|improve this question
    
While Paul R's answer works, consider that manicaesar is a bit more surgical, in that it allows you to suppress exactly the warning you want, without losing other additional warnings which might be important. It seems to me that, in terms of best-practices, manicaesar has The Correct Answer™ –  Olie Jan 18 '13 at 4:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Try -Wno-deprecated-declarations, or its corresponding setting in Xcode, GCC_WARN_ABOUT_DEPRECATED_FUNCTIONS:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
11  
Turns out it's even easier than that; there's a checkbox in the Xcode target settings; your answer prompted me to search there. Thanks! –  Ben Gottlieb Apr 12 '10 at 14:20
1  
You can also do this on a per-file basis. See this answer for adding per-file flags: stackoverflow.com/a/6658549/272473 –  mrwalker Sep 7 '12 at 20:08
1  
answers like this are frustrating for newbs. Try it where? How do I find target settings? A little more explanation would increase the value of this answer. –  noogrub Oct 14 '12 at 11:36
1  
Thanks, Paul. I was using an older iMac that won't upgrade past 10.5.8, so the older details still apply. I found some more detail elsewhere, appreciate your reply. –  noogrub Oct 15 '12 at 14:12
5  
An answer this poorly explained shouldn't be marked as correct. –  Augmental Mar 29 '13 at 19:47

Since I yet can not add a comment to the @samiq post, I think I will expand it. Input mentioned directive before a function / method in which you use deprecated stuff. Then you can restore the previous setting after the definition of the function end:

#pragma GCC diagnostic push 
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wdeprecated-declarations"
- (void) methodUsingDeprecatedStuff {
    //use deprecated stuff
}
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! This is what I was looking for +1 :) –  Zoran Simic Jan 2 '11 at 4:16
1  
Awesome tip! Too bad it can't be declared inside a method. –  Dustin May 24 '11 at 16:16
8  
Actually it can be declared inside a method. I just had to do it today due a bug in the docs/sdk –  jer Jul 22 '12 at 20:49
    
+1 A slightly better way is to use the syntax with #pragma GCC diagnostics push #pragma GCC diagnostics ignored "-Wdeprecated-declarations" .. .. Code here .. .. #pragma GCC diagnostic pop as this method takes you back to whatever setting was set before.. [gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Diagnostic-Pragmas.html] –  Niclas Jan 27 at 14:10
    
Changed acording to suggestions :) –  manicaesar Jan 27 at 14:16

Clang provides a nice feature that makes the "restore" step in the @manicaesar post independent of the initial warning state:

#pragma clang diagnostic push
#pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Wdeprecated-declarations"
- (void) methodUsingDeprecatedStuff {
    //use deprecated stuff
}
#pragma clang diagnostic pop

To quote the Clang manual:

In addition to all of the functionality provided by GCC's pragma, Clang also allows you to push and pop the current warning state. This is particularly useful when writing a header file that will be compiled by other people, because you don't know what warning flags they build with.

share|improve this answer
1  
More recent versions of GCC use the same syntax (substitute clang for GCC). –  Niclas Jan 27 at 14:04

You can also suppress warnings per file by using

#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wdeprecated-declarations"

which in turn makes it a little bit better practice than just suppressing all warning once and together... after all you got to know what you are doing it for.

share|improve this answer

To disable warning from third-party header file, add following line at the top of file

#pragma clang system_header
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.