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How can I use CRTP in C++ to avoid the overhead of virtual member functions?

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3  
Hi, thanks for all your answers. I understand the mechanics of CRTP. However, the problem is that it is not really polymorphism, i.e. if I have X : base<X>{} and Y : base<Y>{}, X & Y are unrelated types. i.e. I can't hold them in the same container, or even use them without knowing the derived type. –  Eggs McLaren Nov 5 '08 at 15:11
9  
This is polymorphism, beit static - When you're going CRTP, you will create templatized client code, which is also (statically) polymorpous: you don't have to change a byte of code for it to work with another type. –  xtofl Dec 4 '08 at 14:17

4 Answers 4

There are two ways.

The first one is by specifying the interface statically for the structure of types:

template <class Derived>
struct base {
  void foo() {
    static_cast<Derived *>(this)->foo();
  };
};

struct my_type : base<my_type> {
  void foo(); // required to compile.
};

struct your_type : base<your_type> {
  void foo(); // required to compile.
};

The second one is by avoiding the use of the reference-to-base or pointer-to-base idiom and do the wiring at compile-time. Using the above definition, you can have template functions that look like these:

template <class T> // T is deduced at compile-time
void bar(base<T> & obj) {
  obj.foo(); // will do static dispatch
}

struct not_derived_from_base { }; // notice, not derived from base

// ...
my_type my_instance;
your_type your_instance;
not_derived_from_base invalid_instance;
bar(my_instance); // will call my_instance.foo()
bar(your_instance); // will call your_instance.foo()
bar(invalid_instance); // compile error, cannot deduce correct overload

So combining the structure/interface definition and the compile-time type deduction in your functions allows you to do static dispatch instead of dynamic dispatch. This is the essence of static polymorphism.

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1  
good example, thanks. –  ttvd Nov 13 '09 at 10:28
11  
Excellent answer –  Eli Bendersky May 4 '11 at 12:51
    
Thanks, got your code to use –  Yola Jan 12 '12 at 16:54
2  
Actually, the declaration of foo() inside my_type/your_type is not required. codepad.org/ylpEm1up (Causes stack overflow) -- Is there a way to enforce a definition of foo at compile time? -- Ok, found a solution: ideone.com/C6Oz9 -- Maybe you want to correct that in your answer. –  cooky451 Mar 3 '12 at 18:35
1  
@Dean Michael Indeed the code in the example compiles even if foo is not defined in the my_type and your_type. Without those overrides the base::foo is recursively called (and stackoverflows). So maybe you want to correct you answer as cooky451 showed? –  mezhaka Apr 16 '13 at 17:37

I've been looking for decent discussions of CRTP myself. Todd Veldhuizen's Techniques for Scientific C++ is a great resource for this (1.3) and many other advanced techniques like expression templates.

Also, I found that you could read most of Coplien's original C++ Gems article at Google books. Maybe that's still the case.

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The link is dead –  Eli Bendersky May 4 '11 at 12:48
    
Fixed, thank you. –  fizzer May 7 '11 at 17:06
    
@fizzer I have read the part you suggest, but still do not understand what does the template<class T_leaftype> double sum(Matrix<T_leaftype>& A); buys you in comparison to template<class Whatever> double sum(Whatever& A); –  mezhaka Apr 16 '13 at 17:45

I had to look up CRTP. Having done that, however, I found some stuff about Static Polymorphism. I suspect that this is the answer to your question.

It turns out that ATL uses this pattern quite extensively.

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This Wikipedia answer has all you need. Namely:

template <class Derived> struct Base
{
    void interface()
    {
        // ...
        static_cast<Derived*>(this)->implementation();
        // ...
    }

    static void static_func()
    {
        // ...
        Derived::static_sub_func();
        // ...
    }
};

struct Derived : Base<Derived>
{
    void implementation();
    static void static_sub_func();
};

Although I don't know how much this actually buys you. The overhead of a virtual function call is (compiler dependent, of course):

  • Memory: One function pointer per virtual function
  • Runtime: One function pointer call

While the overhead of CRTP static polymorphism is:

  • Memory: Duplication of Base per template instantiation
  • Runtime: One function pointer call + whatever static_cast is doing
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1  
Actually, the duplication of Base per template instantiation is an illusion because (unless you still have a vtable) the compiler will merge the storage of the base and the derived into a single struct for you. The function pointer call is also optimized out by the compiler (the static_cast part). –  Dean Michael Nov 4 '08 at 18:52
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@Johann -- no, because it will only compile if Derived inherited from Base<Derived>. Remember that template instantiation can take in an invomplete type as a parameter. Try it for yourself and it will work. –  Dean Michael Nov 5 '08 at 7:48
7  
By the way, your analysis of CRTP is incorrect. It should be: Memory: Nothing, as Dean Michael said. Runtime: One (faster) static function call, not virtual, which is the whole point of the exercise. static_cast doesn't do anything, it just allows the code to compile. –  Frederik Slijkerman Nov 5 '08 at 8:26
    
@Dean Michael -- I stand corrected! Just tried on W4 in VS. Should have done it before opening my big mouth in the first place... –  Johann Gerell Nov 5 '08 at 8:40
1  
My point is that the base code will be duplicated in all template instances (the very merging you talk of). Akin to having a template with only one method that relies on the template parameter; everything else is better in a base class otherwise it is pulled in ('merged') multiple times. –  user23167 Nov 5 '08 at 16:37

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