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When I get a reference to a System.Diagnostics.Process, how can I know if a process is currently running?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 73 down vote accepted

This is a way to do it with the name:

Process[] pname = Process.GetProcessesByName("notepad");
if (pname.Length == 0)
  MessageBox.Show("nothing");
else
  MessageBox.Show("run");

You can loop all process to get the ID for later manipulation:

Process[] processlist = Process.GetProcesses();
foreach(Process theprocess in processlist){
   Console.WriteLine("Process: {0} ID: {1}", theprocess.ProcessName, theprocess.Id);
}
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This is the simplest way I found after using reflector. I created an extension method for that:

public static class ProcessExtensions
{
    public static bool IsRunning(this Process process)
    {
        if (process == null) 
            throw new ArgumentNullException("process");

        try
        {
            Process.GetProcessById(process.Id);
        }
        catch (ArgumentException)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}

The Process.GetProcessById(processId) method calls the ProcessManager.IsProcessRunning(processId) method and throws ArgumentException in case the process does not exist. For some reason the ProcessManager class is internal...

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This was a really good answer; however, you shouldn't have through the argument null exception (Because a null reference exception would have been thrown anyway and you didn't do anything with the exception. Also, you will get an InvalidOperationException if you did not invoke the Start() method or you invoked the close() method. I posted another Answer to account for these two situations. –  Aelphaeis Jan 31 at 14:52

Synchronous solution :

void DisplayProcessStatus(Process process)
{
    process.Refresh();  // Important


    if(process.HasExited)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Exited.");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Running.");
    } 
}

Asynchronous solution:

void RegisterProcessExit(Process process)
{
    // NOTE there will be a race condition with the caller here
    //   how to fix it is left as an exercise
    process.Exited += process_Exited;
}

static void process_Exited(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Process has exited.");
}
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1  
For the first option: how can I know whether the process was started in the first place? –  reshefm Nov 6 '08 at 11:39

Process.GetProcesses() is the way to go. But you may need to use one or more different criteria to find your process, depending on how it is running (i.e. as a service or a normal app, whether or not it has a titlebar).

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It depends on how reliable you want this function to be. If you want to know if the particular Process instance you have is still running and available with 100% accuracy then you are out of luck. The reason being that from the managed process object there are only 2 ways to identify the process

The first is the Process Id. Unforunately process id's are not unique and can be recycled. Searching the process list for a matching Id will only tell you that there is a process with the same id running, but it's not necessarily your process.

The second item is the Process Handle. It has the same problem though as the Id and it's more awkaard to work with.

If you're looking for medium level reliability then checking the current process list for a process of the same ID is sufficient.

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Maybe (probably) I am reading the question wrongly, but are you looking for the HasExited property that will tell you that the process represented by your Process object has exited (either normally or not).

If the process you have a reference to has a UI you can use the Responding property to determine if the UI is currently responding to user input or not.

You can also set EnableRaisingEvents and handle the Exited event (which is sent asychronously) or call WaitForExit() if you want to block.

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You can instantiate a Process instance once for the process you want and keep on tracking the process using that .NET Process object (it will keep on tracking till you call Close on that .NET object explicitly, even if the process it was tracking has died [this is to be able to give you time of process close, aka ExitTime etc.])

Quoting http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fb4aw7b8.aspx:

When an associated process exits (that is, when it is shut down by the operation system through a normal or abnormal termination), the system stores administrative information about the process and returns to the component that had called WaitForExit. The Process component can then access the information, which includes the ExitTime, by using the Handle to the exited process.

Because the associated process has exited, the Handle property of the component no longer points to an existing process resource. Instead, the handle can be used only to access the operating system’s information about the process resource. The system is aware of handles to exited processes that have not been released by Process components, so it keeps the ExitTime and Handle information in memory until the Process component specifically frees the resources. For this reason, any time you call Start for a Process instance, call Close when the associated process has terminated and you no longer need any administrative information about it. Close frees the memory allocated to the exited process.

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I tried Coincoin's solution :
Before processing some file, I copy it as a temporary file and open it.
When I'm done, I close the application if it is still open and delete the temporary file :
I just use a Process variable and check it afterwards :

private Process openApplication;  
private void btnOpenFile_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {  
    ...
    // copy current file to fileCache  
    ...  
    // open fileCache with proper application
    openApplication = System.Diagnostics.Process.Start( fileCache );  
}

Later I close the application :

 ...   
openApplication.Refresh(); 

// close application if it is still open       
if ( !openApplication.HasExited() ) {
    openApplication.Kill();  
}

// delete temporary file  
System.IO.File.Delete( fileCache );

It works ( so far )

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At openApplication.HasExited(), HasExited is not a function. The correct way would be openApplication.HasExited. –  caiosm1005 Dec 30 '13 at 4:24
    string process="notepad";
    if (Process.GetProcessesByName(process).Length == 0)
    {
    MessageBox.Show("Working");
    }
    else
    {
    MessageBox.Show("Not Working");
    }

also you can use a timer for checking the process everytime

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reshefm had a pretty nice answer; however, it does not account for a situation in which the process was never started to begin with.

Here is a a modified version of what he posted.

    public static bool IsRunning(this Process process)
    {
        try  {Process.GetProcessById(process.Id);}
        catch (InvalidOperationException) { return false; }
        catch (ArgumentException){return false;}
        return true;
    }

I removed his ArgumentNullException because its actually suppose to be a null reference exception and it gets thrown by the system anyway and I also accounted for the situation in which the process was never started to begin with or the close() method was used to close the process.

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I believe simplest and most standard way to figure out whether a specific process is running or not is using ProcessIOManager class.

Process process = new Process();
process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
process.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
process.StartInfo.FileName = "process.exe";
process.StartInfo.Arguments = .....;
process.Start();

ProcessIOManager processIOManger = new ProcessIOManager(Process);
  1. if process is running, then processIOManger.RunningProcess.HasExited = false.
  2. if process finished, then processIOManger.RunningProcess.HasExited = true.
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what is it ProcessIOManager class ?? –  Kiquenet Jun 17 '13 at 11:32

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