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I have the following code:

l = ['-1.2', '0.0', '1']

x = 100.0
for i in l:
    if i < x:
        x = i
print x

The code should find the lowest value in my list (-1.2) but instead when i print 'x' it finds the value is still 100.0 Where is my code going wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
It looks like you want "list = [1.2, 0.0, 1]" instead of quoted values. (Also lower case L is a bad variable name... it looks too much like a one). – Stephen Apr 12 '10 at 15:02
1  
An integer is a whole number like 4, 20, 0, and -2. Numbers like -1.2 are not integers. Do you understand that? How does this relate to what you want to do here? – Mike Graham Apr 12 '10 at 15:20

10 Answers 10

To find the minimum value of a list, you might just as well use min:

x = min(float(s) for s in l) # min of a generator
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4  
min has a key argument for cases similar to this, with usage like x = min(l, key=float). It is slightly different than the code posted in that it returns an item from the original iterable (i.e., the string '-1.2') rather than the resultant thing (i.e. the float -1.2). – Mike Graham Apr 12 '10 at 15:15
    
Good point, Mike. – Olivier Verdier Apr 12 '10 at 15:33
    
@OlivierVerdier Is there a particular reason that you do the float(s) for s in l part? Why can't you just do min(l)? I just tried that out and it works. What would be the difference? – ocean800 Feb 28 at 4:28

You aren't comparing integers, you're comparing strings. Strings compare lexicographically -- meaning character by character -- instead of (as you seem to want) by converting the value to a float. Make your list hold numbers (floats or integers, depending on what you want), or convert the strings to floats or integers in your loop, before you compare them.

You may also be interested in the min builtin function, which already does what your current loop does (without the converting, that is.)

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It looks like you want to convert the list to a list of numbers

>>> foo = ['-1.2', '0.0', '1']
>>> bar = map(float, foo)
>>> bar
[-1.2, 0.0, 1.0]
>>> min(bar)
-1.2

or if it really is strings you want, that you want to use min's key argument

>>> foo = ['-1.2', '0.0', '1']
>>> min(foo, key=float)
'-1.2'
share|improve this answer

Python has a built in min function to help you with finding the smallest.

However, you need to convert your list items to numbers before you can find the lowest integer( what, isn't that float? )

min(float(i) for i in l)
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l is a list of strings. When you put numbers between single quotes like that, you are creating strings, which are just a sequence of characters. To make your code work properly, you would have to do this:

l = [-1.2, 0.0, 1]  # no quotation marks

x = 100.0
for i in l:
    if i < x:
        x = i
print x

If you must use a list of strings, you can try to let Python try to make a number out of each string. This is similar to Justin's answer, except it understands floating-point (decimal) numbers correctly.

l = ['-1.2', '0.0', '1']

x = 100.0
for i in l:
    inum = float(i)
    if inum < x:
        x = inum
print x

I hope that this is code that you are writing to learn either Python or programming in general. If this is the case, great. However, if this is production code, consider using Python's built-in functions.

l = ['-1.2', '0.0', '1']
lnums = map(float, l)  # turn strings to numbers
x = min(lnums)  # find minimum value
print x
share|improve this answer

Cast the variable to a float before doing the comparison:

if float(i) < float(x):

The problem is that you are comparing strings to floats, which will not work.

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1  
Note that int('1.2') and int('0.0') will both be an error. – Thomas Wouters Apr 12 '10 at 15:00
    
why not float ? – LB40 Apr 12 '10 at 15:00
    
Thanks, serves me right for trying to answer a question early on a Monday :) – Justin Ethier Apr 12 '10 at 15:03
l = [-1.2, 0.0, 1]

x = 100.0
for i in l:
    if i < x:
        x = i
print (x)

This is the answer, i needed this for my sh!tty little homework, took your code, and i deleted the " " around the numbers, it then worked, i hope this helped

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You have strings in the list and you are comparing them with the number 100.0.

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Or no float conversion at all by just specifying floats in the list.

l = [-1.2, 0.0, 1]
x = min(l)

or

l = min([-1.2, 0.0, 1])
share|improve this answer
number_list = [99.5,1.2,-0.3]

number_list.sort()

print number_list[0]
share|improve this answer
4  
Please add some explanation to complete the answer. With no explanation and just code, this answer is not helpful as a solution (not to mention if it even solves the problem). – Unihedron May 18 '15 at 5:46

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