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In classes that implement INotifyPropertyChanged I often see this pattern :

    public string FirstName
    {
        get { return _customer.FirstName; }
        set
        {
            if (value == _customer.FirstName)
                return;

            _customer.FirstName = value;

            base.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
        }
    }

Precisely the lines

            if (value == _customer.FirstName)
                return;

are bothering me. I've often did this but I am not that sure it's needed nor good. After all if a caller assigns the very same value I don't want to reassign the field and, especially, notify my subscribers that the property has changed when, semantically it didn't.

Except saving some CPU/RAM/etc by freeing the UI from updating something that will probably look the same on the screen/whatever_medium what do we obtain?

Could some people force a refresh by reassigning the same value on a property (NOT THAT THIS WOULD BE A GOOD PRACTICE HOWEVER)?

1. Should we do it or shouldn't we?

2. Why?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, you should return immediately when the consumer is setting a property value that is equal to the value which is already being persisted.

First of all, there is no reason to waste any time or resources in the setter of the property - the value is already set so no further action is needed. Also you should never call OnPropertyChanged if the value stored in the property's backing field hasn't changed - the method is intended to be raised when the value has changed not when the property's setter has been called.

All that being said, however - if the setter didn't have a call to OnPropertyChanged I wouldn't have bothered to check the value first. In the case of a simple setter that only sets the backing field's value and nothing else it is actually going to be faster to always the set the value rather than checking first then setting the value. Only use this pattern when the property's setter has additional logic that either shouldn't fire or may incur an unnecessary performance penalty.

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2  
I think I would disagree that your #2 is true. Depending on what is being done. Comparing two strings is much more expensive than settings the reference to a string. Also you have added processing always, even if they are different. –  galford13x Apr 12 '10 at 16:51
    
To add to my previous statement, calling OnPropertyChanged may still be desired depending on the intent. There may be times that even if the value did not change, you may want to enter the OnPropertyChanged event just because the value had been entered. –  galford13x Apr 12 '10 at 16:54

Or you could do this:

   set
    {
        if (value != _customer.FirstName)
       {

           _customer.FirstName = value;

          base.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
       }
    }

No need for multiple return paths.

To further answer your question, I wouldn't force an update to property if it's being overwritten by the same value. There's really no point, because you're probably not going to get any benefit from it. (I could see an instance where you would want to track each time someone tries to update a value.)

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Anyway I think that what he is asking is not about the exact code path, but rather if it's valid to avoid executing the setter code on duplicate settings. (Work like PUT and not like POST for you web dev guys.) –  voyager Apr 12 '10 at 16:56
2  
No need to increase nesting either. :) –  ANeves Apr 12 '10 at 17:14
    
Actually, a lot of people think that you shouldn't ommit the {} on an if statement so: if(..){return;}. Still nesting, and you have multiple return paths. –  Kevin Apr 12 '10 at 17:31
    
As a personal preference, I don't like adding curly brackets for one-statement blocks... –  Andrei Rînea Apr 12 '10 at 22:35
    
@Andrei: the reasoning behind always using the braces is to minimize the possibility of error. I don't like them either, so I moved on to Python :) –  voyager Apr 13 '10 at 1:00

The only argument against that pattern (where you return if the value hasn't changed) I can think of is the purist's view that every function should have only one exit. Not being a purist, I don't agree. I see nothing wrong with breaking out if the value hasn't changed, avoiding the notification update.

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2  
I've never been convinced by the one exit path to every function/method point. –  voyager Apr 12 '10 at 16:47

The only situation when you shouldn't use it is when you know that you can have dirty data on your class, for example on a ORM layer object that might have outdated values compared to the underlying database because of modification by another user.

If that situation doesn't affect you, then cache away!


Edit

I misunderstood your question, as you are talking about setters, not getters.

Similar points apply. If the set operation is a costly one, and is not supposed to have any kind of side effect (it should't! Side effects on setters are <blink>evil</blink>!!1), then it's a valid optimization.

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One reason to not return early, I would imagine, is for subscribers that joined the party late. They might not be aware of the object's current state, and will miss out on the setter notification if you return early.

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1  
Either the late joiners fed on the current value when they joined, or it wasn't relevant: if they did, they don't need to be updated; if they didn't, they opted to ignore it and don't need to be notified of a change that didn't happen. Either way raising the event is irrelevant. –  ANeves Apr 12 '10 at 17:18
    
@sr, you are laying emphasis on the value. I am giving more importance to the event that triggered the value (not that the value is unimportant, but it's secondary to the event itself). there are perfectly valid use cases where some other object only needs to know the value as it happened, and is not necessarily interested in knowing what happened before it subscribed. if you cannot think of such a use-case, let me know, and i'll give you several examples. –  Anurag Apr 12 '10 at 19:16
    
I appreciate that you made the point, which is very relevant to certain applications. I recently had to revamp an aspect oriented solution for applying property change notifications because the aspect was always immediately returning if the value was equal. That's what I want most of the time, but I ran into a use case for being interested in the event itself, not the actual value. Now I have aspects which can do either. I can see an argument for having a separate event to observe rather that an "on change" event, though. –  DannyMeister Mar 22 '13 at 16:50

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