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Do you agree that the designers of Java class java.io.IOException should have made it an unchecked run-time exception derived from java.lang.RuntimeException instead of a checked exception derived only from java.lang.Exception?

I think that class IOException should have been an unchecked exception because there is little that an application can do to resolve problems like file system errors. However, in When You Can't Throw An Exception, Elliotte Rusty Harold claims that most I/O errors are transient and so you can retry an I/O operation several times before giving up:

For instance, an IOComparator might not take an I/O error lying down, but — because many I/O problems are transient — you can retry a few times, as shown in Listing 7:

Is this generally the case? Can a Java application correct I/O errors or wait for the system to recover? If so, then it is reasonable for IOException to be checked, but if it is not the case, then IOException should be unchecked so that business logic can delegate handling of this exception to a separate system error handler.

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12  
Many people think that EVERY exception should have been unchecked... – leonbloy Apr 12 '10 at 18:06
4  
Many people need to consider which exceptions they WANT to know might happen. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Apr 12 '10 at 18:44
3  
@Thorbjørn: I doubt it's a coincidence that no other language has copied the chekced exception model. It was an interesting experiment, sounds good in theory, but does far more harm than good in practice. – Michael Borgwardt Apr 12 '10 at 19:21
2  
@Michael, I do not agree, but I also think it is a matter of taste. Based on my personal experiences I have reached the conclusion that checked exceptions simply make more robust code, as the error handling gets baked in by the original developer while writing the code, instead of being deferred to later usually ending up being a global catch-all loop. If you don't like the checked exceptions then wrap them in a RuntimeException (and use the message to tell the person reading the log why you chose to do so). – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Apr 12 '10 at 19:26
1  
@Michael, additionally I believe that very few languages get designed by as competent and experienced persons as Gosling and Steele, AND that they came from the LISP'y side. Most other, especially Hejlsberg, came from the C/Pascal side. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Apr 12 '10 at 19:33
up vote 14 down vote accepted

I completely disagree. To me the model is correct. A RuntimeException is one which most typically denotes a serious error in the logic of the programming (such as ArrayIndexOutOfBounds, NullPointer, or IllegalArgument) or something that the runtime has otherwise determined really shouldn't be happening (such as SecurityException).

Conversely IOException and its derivatives are exceptions that could reasonably occur during normal execution of a program, and common logic would dictate that either those problems should be dealt with, or at least the programmer should be aware that they can occur. For example with Files if you're application logger can't write its data would you rather be forced to catch a potential IOException and recover, or have something that may not be critical to your app bring down the whole JVM because no one thought to catch the unchecked Exception (as you may have guessed, I'll choose the former).

I think that there are many situations in which an IOException is either recoverable, or at the least the programmer should be explicitly aware of the potential so that if it is not recoverable the system might be able to crash more "gently".

As far your thought of if the system can not recover there are always alternatives with a checked exception. You can always have your methods declare it in their throws, throw a runtime excpetion of their own or crash the JVM violently:

public void doit() throws IOException {
  try{
  }catch(IOException e){
    //try to recover
    ...

    //can't recover
    throw e;
  }
}

public void doit() {
  try{
  }catch(IOException e){
    //try to recover
    ...

    //can't recover
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  }
}



public void doit() {
  try{
  }catch(IOException e){
    //try to recover
    ...

    //OH NO!!!!
    System.exit(Constant.UNRECOVERABLE_IO_ERROR);
  }
}
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6  
In oracle.com/technology/pub/articles/dev2arch/2006/11/…, Barry Ruzek disagrees: "An I/O failure is a serious but extremely rare event. On top of that, there is usually nothing your code can do to recover from one." According to Ruzek, many Java libraries throw this exception, which suggests that they follow your first approach to recovering from an IOException. However, if some method fails to recover from an IOException, what's the point of throwing it higher when it's unlikely that the client could recover anyway? – Derek Mahar Apr 12 '10 at 18:23
4  
I disagree with "extremely rare" events. Consider a network socket. It is completely reasonable for a client Socket to become disconnected and if you are trying to write or read data this will cause an IOException. For recovery I think you need to be careful about your definition of "recovery". In the socket example you may lose the client connection, but recovery may be a process such as freeing resources that were used by the severed connection. Similarly for rethrowing you may want to log the event close to the originator, but allow something higher up the stack to deal with it. – M. Jessup Apr 12 '10 at 18:36
    
So in what case would you advise re-throwing a RuntimeException after recovery fails? Isn't this little different than (and just as bad as) an unchecked IOException? – Derek Mahar Apr 12 '10 at 19:03
    
EOFException is not 'extremely rare'. It is expected once per connection. And exceptions aren't part of a recovery model anyway - see the extensive discussion in Stroustrup's writings. I completely agree with M. Jessup on this. Fortunately the question is moot as Java is a done deal. – EJP Apr 13 '10 at 7:43
3  
@Derek I am not advocating the rethrow of a RuntimeException. I merely provided that as an example of how one could "simulate" an IOException as being unchecked if for some reason that is desired behavior (which I can't think of a reasonable example where it would be). Similarly for using System.exit as an alternative for failed recovery (perhaps I should have also included the sarcastic "//OH NO!!!!!" for the RuntimeException example). In any case I believe the proper strategy is to catch, attempt to recover if possible, and then rethrow, or return an appropriate value from the method. – M. Jessup Apr 13 '10 at 11:45

I think it is clever to leave it a checked exception. I regard runtime exceptions as bugs, and this is clearly not the case. Recovery by retry is sometimes possible, and also some IOException messages can be informative to the end user (e.g. no permissions to write, not enough disk space, etc).

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1  
I regard checked exceptions as a bug in the language design. You say it yourself: an IOExcpetion message can be informative to the user - but what good is that to the low-level IO method that has no business with the UI and yet is forced to catch the exception or pollute its signature with it? – Michael Borgwardt Apr 12 '10 at 19:13
    
Michael, do you mean the low-level I/O method is forced to catch the exception and pollute its signature, or the UI level code? – Derek Mahar Apr 12 '10 at 19:19
2  
@Michael: IMO the signature is not polluted at all. Just as you specify the returned value type, you should also specify other kind of legitimate outcomes of the action. It has both a practical and a declarative importance. – Eyal Schneider Apr 12 '10 at 21:06
2  
@Derek: I meant the low-level IO code. @Eyal: that's the theory. In practice, it results in horribly leaky abstractions and massively polluted APIs - because we're not talking about just that one method, but everything between it and the point where the exception is finally caught, for every method from which it is called. And the same for every other method that throws checked exceptions. – Michael Borgwardt Apr 12 '10 at 21:32
1  
@MichaelBorgwardt: Within the existing framework, something almost as good could be achieved if there were a concise syntax for marking a method or block with doesntExpect(IOException) {...code...} which would translate almost as try {...code...} catch(IOException ex) {throw new UnexpectedException(ex);};, but which would not catch exceptions thrown by throw statements within the block [as distinct from those thrown by nested method calls or implicitly by operations]. The Runtime would have no trouble handling such try/catch constructs if the compiler could generate them. – supercat Aug 23 '14 at 16:36

Probably the vast majority of IO exceptions are recoverable - permissions errors, lack of space on the drive, connection closed, etc, etc. I believe unchecked exceptions are supposed to be used for "there's no reasonable way to recover from this" sorts of situations.

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No because you can recover from some IOExceptions. Most notable ones are low level indexed reads and writes. If it fails, sometimes you can just retry without harm.

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In a well-designed exception framework, a distinction should be made between exceptions which are to some extent "expected" and those which are not. Java attempts to use checked versus unchecked exceptions for this. By that standard, IOException should be a checked exception.

A fundamental problem, though, is that oftentimes code will be written with a (perhaps reasonable) expectation that a certain exception will not occur, and nothing can usefully be done to handle it if it does. If a method is declared as throwing a particular checked exception, Java allows its caller to ignore the exception if it declares itself as throwing that exception, but there's no means by which a method or code block can specify that certain exceptions from called methods are not expected to occur. A common anti-pattern is:

try
{
  methodThatsDeclaredAsThrowingFooExceptionButWont()
}
catch FooException Ex
{
  // Never going to happen
}

The apparent assumption is that since the method won't throw FooException and the only reason the catch is there is to make the compiler happy, there's no reason for the catch to do anything. Insidious, because if a FooException does get thrown, for whatever reason, it will go undetected.

An alternative is for a method which calls methodThatsDeclaredAsThrowingFooExceptionButWont to declare itself as throws FooException or throws Exception, but that isn't really appropriate either. If a method which is not expected to throw a FooException does, the system state is apt to be different from what it would be expected when a FooException is thrown.

For example, suppose one attempts to load a document, but the document-load routine needs to read some non-document-specific translation tables which are supposed to be stored at a fixed location; if that attempt fails, having the IOException percolate up to the caller would imply that there was a problem loading the document being loaded. If the load-document routine isn't prepared to sensibly handle the possibility that the load-translation-tables routine might fail, such failure shouldn't percolate up the same way as would an IOException that occurred while actually loading the document.

The proper remedy would not be for IOException to be an unchecked exception, but rather for there to be a declarative means by which code could indicate that one or more kinds of checked exceptions should not be allowed to percolate out of a certain block from methods called thereby, but should instead be wrapped in some other exception type (e.g. RuntimeException).

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I know it has been 4 years since this question was asked but an UncheckedIOException was added in Java 8.

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The Java 8 API designers must have read my question! In hindsight, I should have invented UncheckIOException myself and copyrighted the API so that Oracle would have had to pay me license fees. :) – Derek Mahar Nov 14 '14 at 23:14

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