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I want a really fast algorithm or code in C to do the following task: sum all numbers from 1 to N for any given integer N, without assuming N is positive. I made a loop summing from 1 to N, but it is too slow.

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7  
Homework, ey...? –  0xA3 Apr 12 '10 at 18:33
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Sophomore? My 8yr old knows this formula. –  NVRAM Apr 12 '10 at 20:06
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wasn't there a recent thread (or maybe even a codinghorror blog post) about how programmers don't actually need to know math? I think this question is a perfect illustration of why they do need to know math! (and I use "math" in the sense most lay-people generally mean it, not in the sense that encompasses computer science, logic, etc) –  rmeador Apr 12 '10 at 20:25
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Who has upvoted this question? –  qrdl Apr 12 '10 at 20:28
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@qrdl: Somebody going for the Electorate badge? –  David Thornley Apr 12 '10 at 22:00
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9 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

If N is positive: int sum = N*(N+1)/2;

If N is negative: int tempN = -N; int sum = 1 + tempN*(tempN+1)/2 * (-1);.

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"If N is negative" needs a + 1 on the end. 1 + 0 + -1 + -2 = -2, not -3. –  tloflin Apr 12 '10 at 18:37
    
Oops! Thanks, missed it. –  IVlad Apr 12 '10 at 18:40
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@Dave: Yes, you should always perform premature optimization because it really makes a difference, and the compiler would never be smart enough to figure that out by itself. Also note that it might be faster because it does not do the same thing (you'd want >> 1). –  erikkallen Apr 12 '10 at 19:52
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No explanation on how this works? I'll give it a shot: N/2 finds the average value of all numbers between 0 and N. We're starting at 1, so change that to (N+1)/2. Now that we have the average value, we just need to multiply that by the number of values in the sequence (N) (actually N-1(starting value)+1(1 to 2 contains 2 values, not 2-1=1), but N-1+1=N). So N*((N+1)/2), reduced = N*(N+1)/2. –  Wallacoloo Apr 12 '10 at 22:20
    
@erikkallen: (upvote for my smile). Plus I believe the right shift is implementation-defined for signed data? –  Dan Apr 12 '10 at 22:39
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sum = N * (N + 1) / 2
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But that's only O(1)! –  dancavallaro Apr 12 '10 at 18:31
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you could always hard code the summation values of −32,768 to +32,767. Even fewer cycles :D –  YAZ Apr 12 '10 at 18:33
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I do not think it works with negative number. If N is -3, this formula give 3 but -3+-2+-1+0+1 = -5 –  Patrick Desjardins Apr 12 '10 at 18:36
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@gmatt is correct, this is actually O(log N), unless you limit the value of N, in which case the naïve loop is O(1) as well. –  avakar Apr 12 '10 at 18:36
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If my understanding of wikipedia is correct, the Schönhage-Strassen algorithm (which appears to be the fastest discovered, practically usable algorithm) would geve a time complexity for this problem of O(log N log log N log log log N) –  erikkallen Apr 12 '10 at 20:30
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The formula you're looking for is a more general form of the one posted in multiple answers to your question, which is an Arithmetic Series/Progression with a difference factor of 1. From Wikipedia, it is the following:

alt text

The above formula will handle negative numbers as long as m is always less than n. For example to get the sum from 1 to -2, set m to -2 and n to 1, i.e. the sum from -2 to 1. Doing so results in:

(1 - -2 + 1) * (1 + -2) / 2 = 4 * -1 / 2 = -4 / 2 = -2.

which is the expected result.

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+1 for giving the general formula. –  Matthieu M. Apr 13 '10 at 7:27
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Just to complete the above answers, this is how you prove the formula (sample for positive integer but principle is the same for negatives or any arithmetic suite as Void pointed out).

Just write the suite two times as below and add numbers:

  1+   2+   3+ ... n-2+ n-1+   n   = sum(1..n)     : n terms from 1 to n
+ n+ n-1+ n-2+ ...   3+   2+   1   = sum(n..1)     : the same n terms in reverse order
--------------------------------
n+1+ n+1+ n+1+ ... n+1+ n+1+ n+1   = 2 * sum(1..n) : n times n+1

n * (n+1) / 2 = sum(1..n)
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third term of sum(n..1) should be n-2. –  Wallacoloo Apr 12 '10 at 22:22
    
+1 for explaining it intuitively –  Anurag Apr 12 '10 at 22:28
    
+1 Nicely, done. –  Void Apr 12 '10 at 22:36
    
@wallacoloo: thanks. I corrected the answer (and also another typo). –  kriss Apr 12 '10 at 22:36
    
@Void: thanks but I've no merit, it's Gauss's classical proof. –  kriss Apr 12 '10 at 22:39
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To deal with integer overflow I'd use the following function:

sum = (N%2) ? ( ((N+1)/2)*N ) : ( (N/2)*(N+1) );
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clever... But this is still vulnerable to integer overflow. You aren't "dealing" with it, merely delaying it. –  Wallacoloo Apr 12 '10 at 22:05
    
It will "delay" it as long as possible. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Apr 13 '10 at 3:46
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Try this...

Where n is the maximum integer you need to sum to.

The sum is (n*(N+1))/2

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int sum(int n) { return (n < 0 ? n *(-n + 1) / 2 + 1 : n * ( n + 1) / 2); }

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have you heard about sequence & series ? The 'fast' code that you want is that of sum of arithmetic series from 1 to N .. google it .. infact open your mathematics book..

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if |n| is small enough, a lookup table will be the fastest one.

or using a cache, first search the cache, if can't find the record then caculate the sum by using n * (n + 1) / 2(if n is positive), and record the result into the cache.

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