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Quick add on requirement in our project. A field in our DB to hold a phone number is set to only allow 10 characters. So, if I get passed "(913)-444-5555" or anything else, is there a quick way to run a string through some kind of special replace function that I can pass it a set of characters to allow?

Regex?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 102 down vote accepted

Definitely regex:

string CleanPhone(string phone)
{
    Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");   
    return digitsOnly.Replace(phone, "");
}

or within a class to avoid re-creating the regex all the time:

private static Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");   

public static string CleanPhone(string phone)
{
    return digitsOnly.Replace(phone, "");
}

Depending on your real-world inputs, you may want some additional logic there to do things like strip out leading 1's (for long distance) or anything trailing an x or X (for extensions).

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That's perfect. This is only used a couple of times, so we don't need to create a class, and as far as the leading 1, not a bad idea. But I think I'd rather handle that on a case by case basis, at least in this project. Thanks again -- if I could upvote again, I would. –  Matt Dawdy Nov 4 '08 at 17:01
1  
I'm waiting for someone to post an extension method version of this for the string class :) –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 4 '08 at 17:33
    
@Joel I added the extension method version below. Guess the comments don't support markdown. –  Aaron Oct 21 '11 at 18:07
    
Note [^\d] can be simplified to \D –  p.s.w.g Jul 15 at 18:24

You can do it easily with regex:

string subject = "(913)-444-5555";
string result = Regex.Replace(subject, "[^0-9]", ""); // result = "9134445555"
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1  
Upvoted for being a great answer, but Joel beat you out. Thanks for the answer though -- I really like to see confirmation from multiple sources. –  Matt Dawdy Nov 4 '08 at 17:04

Here's the extension method way of doing it.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string ToDigitsOnly(this string input)
    {
        Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");
        return digitsOnly.Replace(input, "");
    }
}
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Using the Regex methods in .NET you should be able to match any non-numeric digit using \D, like so:

phoneNumber  = Regex.Replace(phoneNumber, "\D", "");
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2  
This isn't quite right. You need a @ or "\\D" to escape the \ in the regex. Also, you should use String.Empty instead of "" –  Bryan Aug 20 '12 at 19:34

You don't need to use Regex.

phone = new String(phone.Where(c => char.IsDigit(c)).ToArray())
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1  
Nice Answer, why add more reference to RegularExpressions namespace –  Eyakem Mar 17 at 12:46

I'm sure there's a more efficient way to do it, but I would probably do this:

string getTenDigitNumber(string input)
{    
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i - 0; i < input.Length; i++)
    {
        int junk;
        if(int.TryParse(input[i], ref junk))
            sb.Append(input[i]);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}
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That was my first instinct, and was also why I asked here. RegEx seems like a much better solution to me. But thanks for the answer! –  Matt Dawdy Nov 4 '08 at 17:03

How about an extension method that doesn't use regex.

If you do stick to one of the Regex options at least use RegexOptions.Compiled in the static variable.

public static string ToDigitsOnly(this string input)
{
    return new String(input.Where(char.IsDigit).ToArray());
}

This builds on Usman Zafar's answer converted to a method group.

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try this

public static string cleanPhone(string inVal)
        {
            char[] newPhon = new char[inVal.Length];
            int i = 0;
            foreach (char c in inVal)
                if (c.CompareTo('0') > 0 && c.CompareTo('9') < 0)
                    newPhon[i++] = c;
            return newPhon.ToString();
        }
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