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I know I've done this before years ago, but I can't remember the syntax, and I can't find it anywhere due to pulling up tons of help docs and articles about "bulk imports".

Here's what I want to do, but the syntax is not exactly right... please, someone who has done this before, help me out :)

INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name)
VALUES (123, 'Timmy'),
    (124, 'Jonny'),
    (125, 'Sally')

I know that this is close to the right syntax. I might need the word "BULK" in there, or something, I can't remember. Any idea?

EDIT: Particularly, I need this for a SQL Server 2005 database. I've tried this code, to no avail:

DECLARE @blah TABLE
(
    ID INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    Name VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO @blah (ID, Name)
    VALUES (123, 'Timmy')
    VALUES (124, 'Jonny')
    VALUES (125, 'Sally')

SELECT * FROM @blah

I'm getting Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'VALUES'.

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12 Answers 12

up vote 116 down vote accepted
INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name)
SELECT 123, 'Timmy'
UNION ALL
SELECT 124, 'Jonny'
UNION ALL
SELECT 125, 'Sally'

For SQL Server 2008, can do it in one VALUES clause exactly as per the statement in your question...

share|improve this answer
    
I think that it's better to write more ugly rather than less effective. I mean unnecessary load of database engine –  abatishchev Apr 13 '10 at 17:36
3  
@abatishchev: And which one do you mean is more effective –  erikkallen Apr 13 '10 at 18:48
1  
@erikkallen: Which is - how do you guess? –  abatishchev Apr 13 '10 at 19:11
1  
@Code Commander: no, in that it is longer to compile. Yes, in that you have one insert only. But it answers the question: no repeat of the INSERT table (columnlist) –  gbn Oct 25 '11 at 4:23
1  
@VoidKing I know this comes half a year later and you might have figured this out yet long ago, but it's really quite simple. By using select you create a set with columns and rows, and by design these rows can be inserted into another table with an equal amount of columns. You can even use a mixture of literals and values. For example, using insert with select 'A', ID from ATable would insert 'A' in the first column every time and the ID column value of the corresponding row of ATable in the second column. –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 30 at 9:06

Your syntax works in SQL Server 2008 (but not in SQL Server 20051):

CREATE TABLE MyTable (id int, name char(10));

INSERT INTO MyTable (id, name) VALUES (1, 'Bob'), (2, 'Peter'), (3, 'Joe');

SELECT * FROM MyTable;

id |  name
---+---------
1  |  Bob       
2  |  Peter     
3  |  Joe       

1 When the question was answered, it was not made evident that the question was referring to SQL Server 2005. I am leaving this answer here, since I believe it is still relevant.

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1  
But don't in SQL Server 2005. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174335.aspx: SQL Server 2008 introduces the Transact-SQL row constructor (also called a table value constructor) to specify multiple rows in a single INSERT statement. –  abatishchev Apr 13 '10 at 17:29
3  
@abatishchev: Yes, but when answer the question (4 minutes after it was posted), the question was not tagged 'sql-server-2005'. In fact the OP later edited the post to specify this, and it is clear from the 'EDIT' label. The original question was simply tagged 'tsql'. –  Daniel Vassallo Apr 13 '10 at 17:32
1  
I see. Nothing against your post :) Just info, for OP first of all –  abatishchev Apr 13 '10 at 17:35
1  
Thanks for this answer/info... it is very helpful. I guess I was using a SQL 2008 beta box or something, because it was years ago. –  Timothy Khouri Apr 13 '10 at 21:47
3  
Server 2008 doesn't allow more than 1000 rows inserted this way. –  Michael Sep 9 '13 at 21:38

If your data is already in your database you can do:

INSERT INTO MyTable(ID, Name)
SELECT ID, NAME FROM OtherTable

If you need to hard code the data then SQL 2008 and later versions let you do the following...

INSERT INTO MyTable (Name, ID)
VALUES ('First',1),
('Second',2),
('Third',3),
('Fourth',4),
('Fifth',5)
share|improve this answer

You could do this (ugly but it works):

INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name) 
select * from
(
 select 123, 'Timmy'
  union all
 select 124, 'Jonny' 
  union all
 select 125, 'Sally'
 ...
) x
share|improve this answer

You can insert multiple rows using a single SQL INSERT statement. Bellow Code works fine in in SQL Server 2008.

DECLARE @blah TABLE
(
    ID INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    Name VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO @blah (ID, Name)
    VALUES(123, 'Timmy'),
    (124, 'Jonny'),
    (125, 'Sally');

SELECT * FROM @blah
share|improve this answer

This will work:

INSERT INTO MyTable
   (Field1,   Field2)
VALUES ('Value1','Value2'),
   ('ValueA', 'ValueB');

User parentheses and a comma at the end of each set of values

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1  
Correct, this works for SQL 2008 and above - my original question back then was for SQL Server 2005. –  Timothy Khouri May 18 '12 at 3:02

You can use a union:

INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name) 
SELECT ID, Name FROM (
    SELECT 123, 'Timmy'
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 124, 'Jonny'
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 125, 'Sally'
) AS X (ID, Name)
share|improve this answer

This looks OK for SQL Server 2008. For SS2005 & earlier, you need to repeat the VALUES statement.

INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name)  
VALUES (123, 'Timmy')  
VALUES (124, 'Jonny')   
VALUES (125, 'Sally')  

EDIT:: My bad. You have to repeat the 'INSERT INTO' for each row in SS2005.

INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name)  
VALUES (123, 'Timmy')  
INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name)  
VALUES (124, 'Jonny')   
INSERT INTO dbo.MyTable (ID, Name)  
VALUES (125, 'Sally')  
share|improve this answer
2  
This isn't working for me... "Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'VALUES'." –  Timothy Khouri Apr 12 '10 at 19:38
USE YourDB
GO
INSERT INTO MyTable (FirstCol, SecondCol)
SELECT 'First' ,1
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Second' ,2
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Third' ,3
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Fourth' ,4
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Fifth' ,5
GO

OR YOU CAN USE ANOTHER WAY

INSERT INTO MyTable (FirstCol, SecondCol)
VALUES 
('First',1),
('Second',2),
('Third',3),
('Fourth',4),
('Fifth',5)
share|improve this answer

Corresponding to INSERT (Transact-SQL) (SQL Server 2005) you can't omit INSERT INTO dbo.Blah and have to specify it every time or use another syntax/approach,

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It would be easier to use XML in SQL Server to insert multiple rows otherwise it becomes very tedious.

View full article with code explanations here http://www.cyberminds.co.uk/blog/articles/how-to-insert-multiple-rows-in-sql-server.aspx

Copy the following code into sql server to view a sample.

declare @test nvarchar(max)

set @test = '<topic><dialog id="1" answerId="41">
        <comment>comment 1</comment>
        </dialog>
    <dialog id="2" answerId="42" >
    <comment>comment 2</comment>
        </dialog>
    <dialog id="3" answerId="43" >
    <comment>comment 3</comment>
        </dialog>
    </topic>'

declare @testxml xml
set @testxml = cast(@test as xml)
declare @answerTemp Table(dialogid int, answerid int, comment varchar(1000))

insert @answerTemp
SELECT  ParamValues.ID.value('@id','int') ,
ParamValues.ID.value('@answerId','int') ,
ParamValues.ID.value('(comment)[1]','VARCHAR(1000)')
FROM @testxml.nodes('topic/dialog') as ParamValues(ID)
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This is working very fast,and efficient in SQL. Suppose you have Table Sample with 4 column a,b,c,d where a,b,d are int and c column is Varchar(50).

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Sample](
[a] [int] NULL,
[b] [int] NULL,
[c] [varchar](50) COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS NULL,
[D] [int] NULL

)

So you cant inset multiple records in this table using following query without repeating insert statement,

DECLARE @LIST VARCHAR(MAX)
SET @LIST='SELECT 1, 1, ''Charan Ghate'',11
     SELECT 2,2, ''Mahesh More'',12
     SELECT 3,3,''Mahesh Nikam'',13
     SELECT 4,4, ''Jay Kadam'',14'
INSERT SAMPLE (a, b, c,d) EXEC(@LIST)

Also With C# using SqlBulkCopy bulkcopy = new SqlBulkCopy(con)

You can insert 10 rows at a time

   DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        dt.Columns.Add("a");
        dt.Columns.Add("b");
        dt.Columns.Add("c");
        dt.Columns.Add("d");
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
            dr["a"] = 1;
            dr["b"] = 2;
            dr["c"] = "Charan";
            dr["d"] = 4;
            dt.Rows.Add(dr);
        }
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("Connection String");
        using (SqlBulkCopy bulkcopy = new SqlBulkCopy(con))
        {
            con.Open();
            bulkcopy.DestinationTableName = "Sample";
            bulkcopy.WriteToServer(dt);
            con.Close();
        }
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protected by Martin Smith Oct 16 '12 at 12:15

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