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I want to create an object, let's say a Pie.

class Pie 
  def initialize(name, flavor) 
    @name = name 
    @flavor = flavor 
  end 
end

But a Pie can be divided in 8 pieces, a half or just a whole Pie. For the sake of argument, I would like to know how I could give each Pie object a price per 1/8, 1/4 or per whole. I could do this by doing:

class Pie 
  def initialize(name, flavor, price_all, price_half, price_piece) 
    @name = name 
    @flavor = flavor 
    @price_all = price_all
    @price_half = price_half
    @price_piece = price_piece
  end 
end 

But now, if I would create fifteen Pie objects, and I would take out randomly some pieces somewhere by using a method such as

getPieceOfPie(pie_name)

How would I be able to generate the value of all the available pies that are whole and the remaining pieces? Eventually using a method such as:

   myCurrentInventoryHas(pie_name)
   # output: 2 whole strawberry pies and 7 pieces.

I know, I am a Ruby nuby. Thank you for your answers, comments and help!

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+1 for that term - Ruby Nuby :) –  Anurag Apr 12 '10 at 20:43
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll definitely want separate Pie and PiePiece classes

class Pie
  attr_accessor :pieces
  def initialize
    self.pieces = []
  end

  def add_piece(flavor)
    raise "Pie cannot have more than 8 pieces!" if pieces.count == 8
    self.pieces << PiePiece.new(flavor)
  end

  # a ruby genius could probably write this better... chime in if you can help
  def inventory
    Hash[pieces.group_by(&:flavor).map{|f,p| [f, p.size]}]
  end

end

class PiePiece
  attr_accessor :flavor
  def initialize(flavor)
    self.flavor = flavor
  end
end

sample code

p = Pie.new
p.add_piece(:strawberry)
p.add_piece(:strawberry)
p.add_piece(:apple)
p.add_piece(:cherry)
p.add_piece(:cherry)
p.add_piece(:cherry)

p.inventory.each_pair do |flavor, count|
  puts "Pieces of #{flavor}: #{count}"
end

# output
# Pieces of strawberry: 2
# Pieces of apple: 1
# Pieces of cherry: 3
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1  
Sweet, I like this answer. Indeed it's the inventory counting I'm struggling with. Thank you so much for helping out! –  Shyam Apr 12 '10 at 21:21
    
@Shyam, I updated the post to show a possible way to do the inventory counting. Someone who has a better mastery of Array and Hash methods would probably be able to write it better though :) –  maček Apr 12 '10 at 21:28
    
Excellent. No need for a genius, you already did a great job. Thanks! –  Shyam Apr 12 '10 at 22:14
    
@Shyam, @mckeed helped out. I updated the Pie#inventory method to showcase his genius. –  maček Apr 13 '10 at 2:34
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Could you create a PieSlice object, and each Pie would have an array of PieSlices?

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Thats a great idea!!! Thanks a bunch!! –  Shyam Apr 12 '10 at 21:12
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The Pie class could have a counter to indicate what fraction of it remains. The getPieceOfPie method would modify this counter. The myCurrentInventoryHas method could then look at each Pie and see how much of that Pie there is be examining the counter.

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A piece of pie is not a pie.

(talking in oo terms, an object should have a clear responsibility, making an object a pie AND a slice may not be a clear responsibility assignment).

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I do agree with you. And one of the reasons of asking this question is to figure out the solution using OO and elegancy. –  Shyam Apr 12 '10 at 21:15
1  
I think that if you have a Pie with an array of slices, there is no "violation" of the OO principles. –  Shyam Apr 12 '10 at 21:18
    
It all depends on what you want to do with your pie and pieces. If you can assume that each piece is independent (you don't need to know if a pie is cut or not) you probably need only a PieInventory and a PiePiece. The inventory can grow and shrink as you call push_pieces(n) and pull_pieces(n). –  baol Apr 12 '10 at 21:54
    
But what if I would want to know when a pie is cut? It is the whole idea of the question! I know, its an awkward one, but thats why its bugging me :) –  Shyam Apr 12 '10 at 22:12
    
I would just suppose that you have n/8 pies and n%8 cut pieces. Why would you cut more than one pie at a time? –  baol Apr 13 '10 at 11:59
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