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I stumbled upon this while doing a review and the author is not available:

int n = Convert.ToInt32(text);
if (((n > 0) || (n < 0)) || (n == 0))
{
  return 1;
}

The code in general looks solid and it's hard for me to believe that the only purpose of this snippet is to confuse reviewers, but I don't see a way for this condition to fail. Am I missing something?

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The code after the if() statement would be interesting. Does it call Environment.FailFast()? –  Hans Passant Apr 12 '10 at 22:14
    
What if text is null or something that isn't convertable to a 32-bit integer? –  JB King Apr 12 '10 at 22:15
    
@JB King: You'll get an exception: ArgumentNullException, FormatException or OverflowException, I think. –  Samir Talwar Apr 12 '10 at 22:25
2  
Note that it is not the case that this is always true for doubles and floats; NaNs are not equal to anything, not even themselves. –  Eric Lippert Apr 12 '10 at 23:39
1  
Do you have change logs available? Perhaps investigating what else changed in that change set will illuminate what they were thinking. –  Eric Lippert Apr 12 '10 at 23:39
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11 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This may be a remnant of a nullable type. See here at msdn for an explanation, but basically if your code was originally this:

int? n = StringToInt(text);    // People roll their own functions to do this, though
                               // they really shouldn't
if (((n > 0) || (n < 0)) || (n == 0))
{
  return 1;
}

Then this could possibly fall through. Each of the statements above would be false, as n could be null from the function, assuming it returned null on a bad input, and the code supported nullable types.

Unlikely, but when looking at "maintained code" anything is possible. But as written, it MUST return 1 (or throw an exception, as mentioned by others in this thread).

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1  
+1 for detective work. –  GManNickG Apr 12 '10 at 22:21
    
This might be it. There are some unused string-manipulation methods in the project. –  BojanG Apr 12 '10 at 23:04
1  
Why didn't they just do if(n.HasValue) ? –  Earlz Apr 12 '10 at 23:28
1  
Nullables are relatively new (.NET 3.0 and up) and still no one would check it that way instead of simply checking (n != null). –  Danny Varod Apr 13 '10 at 8:09
2  
@Danny - nullable types were available in 2.0 –  ScottE Apr 13 '10 at 20:10
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It will always return true, assuming it gets there.

Consider:

bool x = (n > 0) || (n < 0);
bool y = (n == 0);

if (x || y)
{
    return 1;
}

If n is not zero then either n > 0 or n < 0 is true, so x is true and y is false.

If n is zero, n == 0 is true, so x is false and y is true.

Either way, one side of the OR is true.

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1  
So you are saying that really he should just do a return 1; without all the n< n> n== nonsense? –  Earlz Apr 12 '10 at 22:05
    
@Earlz: Right. If ToInt32 doesn't throw, the function ends with a return 1;. Might as will ditch the tautology. –  GManNickG Apr 12 '10 at 22:07
    
ToInt32 can throw, though. –  cpalmer Apr 12 '10 at 22:11
1  
@cpalmer yea it can throw? But without the if statement it'd behave the exact same way. It'd just get thrown outside the function.. why is everyone making such a big deal about the can-throw bit. –  Earlz Apr 12 '10 at 22:14
    
@cpalmer: And...? @Earlz: I agree. The question is about the purpose of the logic in the if-statement, obviously we're assuming we got there... –  GManNickG Apr 12 '10 at 22:17
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That sure looks like a 100% true statement to me. All those parentheses shouldn't matter in the least, since || is associative, i.e.,

(a || b) || c == a || (b || c) == a || b || c
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1  
Nitpickerme: its associativity not transitivity you are describing... –  Dirk Apr 12 '10 at 22:08
    
@Dirk DANG. I was afraid I'd screwed that up. Fixed. Thanks! –  abeger Apr 13 '10 at 20:07
    
... now I can rest. :-) –  Dirk Apr 13 '10 at 20:41
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If you overload the relational operators for your class, it might be the case that the condition evaluates to false, but since n is an int, it always evaluates to true

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+1 for an entirely irrelevant but still interesting mention to operator overloading ;) . I hope to remember that on my next obfuscation project. –  herenvardo Apr 18 '10 at 21:29
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It's possible that int n = Convert.ToInt32(text); could throw an exception, in which case the if statement never even gets evaluated.

See Convert.ToInt32() on MSDN.

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1  
You beat me to it... –  Xander Apr 12 '10 at 22:04
3  
Which says nothing about the question the OP asked. –  GManNickG Apr 12 '10 at 22:17
    
Ahm, I posted that answer first. –  Danny Varod Apr 13 '10 at 8:10
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As above, it will always be true because, by definition, any real number is either zero, less than zero or greater than zero, and you have covered all cases in your code.

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Always will be 1, unless Convert.ToInt32(text) throws an exception.

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I don't see how it can evaluate to false.

If, however, n was declared at a different scope where more than a single thread had access to it and one of these threads changes its value, theres quite a high chance the condition would fail.

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it will always be true as you write all the states it might be (e.g < > ==)

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Yes, it could also throw an exception if the conversion fails :-)

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1  
In that case, the if-statement will never be evaluated. –  Mike Daniels Apr 12 '10 at 22:20
    
True, but the code included more than just one line. –  Danny Varod Apr 13 '10 at 8:07
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Apparently it does evaluate to true, but 10 answers meaning the same thing doesn't evaluate to enough.

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