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I have this set of routes:

        routes.MapRoute(
            "IssueType",
            "issue/{type}",
            new { controller = "Issue", action = "Index" }
        );

        routes.MapRoute(
            "Default", // Route name
            "{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parameters
            new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional } // Parameter defaults
        );

Here is the controller class:

public class IssueController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        // todo: redirect to concrete type
        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult Index(string type)
    {
        return View();
    }
}

why, when i request http://host/issue i get The current request for action 'Index' on controller type 'IssueController' is ambiguous between the following action methods:
I expect that first one method should act when there is no parameters, and second one when some parameter specified.

where did i made mistake?

UPD: possible duplicate: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/436866/can-you-overload-controller-methods-in-asp-net-mvc

UPD 2: due to the link above - there is no any legal way to make action overloading, is it?

UPD 3: Action methods cannot be overloaded based on parameters (c) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.mvc.controller%28VS.100%29.aspx

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would have one Index method that looks for a valid type variable

    public class IssueController : Controller  
{  
    public ActionResult Index(string type)  
    {  
        if(string.isNullOrEmpty(type)){
            return View("viewWithOutType");}
        else{
            return View("viewWithType");} 
    }
}

EDIT:

How about creating a custom attribute that looks for a specific request value as in this post StackOverflow

[RequireRequestValue("someInt")] 
public ActionResult MyMethod(int someInt) { /* ... */ } 

[RequireRequestValue("someString")] 
public ActionResult MyMethod(string someString) { /* ... */ } 

public class RequireRequestValueAttribute : ActionMethodSelectorAttribute { 
    public RequireRequestValueAttribute(string valueName) { 
        ValueName = valueName; 
    } 
    public override bool IsValidForRequest(ControllerContext controllerContext, MethodInfo methodInfo) { 
        return (controllerContext.HttpContext.Request[ValueName] != null); 
    } 
    public string ValueName { get; private set; } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
yep, it's obvious but not actually solution for the issue – zerkms Apr 13 '10 at 3:14
1  
yep, this bring some kind of overloading but too dirty, so i choose to simply rename second method. thanks – zerkms Apr 13 '10 at 5:17

I ran into a similar situation where I wanted my "Index" action to handle the rendering if I had an ID specified or not. The solution I came upon was to make the ID parameter to the Index method optional. For example, I originally tried having both:

public ViewResult Index()
{
    //...
}
// AND
public ViewResult Index(int entryId)
{
    //...
}

and I just combined them and changed it to:

public ViewResult Index(int entryId = 0)
{
    //...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This could be a solution for .NET 4.0, but I was using 3.5 those days ;-) – zerkms Sep 2 '11 at 22:29

All you have to do is mark your second Action with [HttpPost]. For instance:

public class IssueController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        // todo: redirect to concrete type
        return View();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(string type)
    {
        return View();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Who told you that second one is POSTed? – zerkms Aug 27 '11 at 23:31
    
Seems very odd to me... – YoupTube Mar 16 '15 at 16:09

You can do it using an ActionFilterAttribute that checks the parameters using reflection (I tried it) but it's a bad idea. Each distinct action should have its own name.

Why not just call your two methods "Index" and "Single", say, and live with the limitation on naming?

Unlike methods that are bound at compile time based on matching signatures, a missing route value at the end is treated like a null.

If you want the [hack] ActionFilterAttribute that matches parameters let me know and I'll post a link to it, but like I said, it's a bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
I already rename second so i have 2 methods. And i get a lot of links to ActionFilterAttribute, indeed - it's a worse solution. thank you anyway. – zerkms Apr 13 '10 at 5:16

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