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$s = explode (" ", microtime());
$s = $s[0]+$s[1];
$con = mysqli_connect ('localhost', 'test', 'pass', 'db') or die('Err');

for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {

  $stmt = $con -> prepare( " SELECT MAX(id) AS max_id , MIN(id) AS min_id FROM tb ");
  $stmt -> execute();
  $stmt->bind_result($M,$m);
  $stmt->free_result();
  $rand = mt_rand( $m , $M ).'<br/>';

  $res = $con -> prepare( " SELECT * FROM tb WHERE id >= ? LIMIT 0,1 ");
  $res -> bind_param("s", $rand);
  $res -> execute();
  $res->free_result();
}

$e = explode (" ", microtime());
$e = $e[0]+$e[1];
echo  number_format($e-$s, 4, '.', '');

// and:

$link = mysql_connect ("localhost", "test", "pass") or die ();
mysql_select_db ("db") or die ("Unable to select database".mysql_error());

for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {
  $range_result = mysql_query( " SELECT MAX(`id`) AS max_id , MIN(`id`) AS min_id FROM tb ");
  $range_row = mysql_fetch_object( $range_result ); 
  $random = mt_rand( $range_row->min_id , $range_row->max_id );
  $result = mysql_query( " SELECT * FROM tb WHERE id >= $random LIMIT 0,1 ");
}

defenitly prepared statements are much more safer but also every where it says that they are much faster BUT in my test on the above code I have: - 2.45 sec for prepared statements - 5.05 sec for the secon example

What do you think I'm doing wrong? Should I use the second solution or I should try to optimize the prep stmt?

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6  
2.45 is faster than 5.05? –  Dean Harding Apr 13 '10 at 0:17
2  
please format the code so that it is readable. –  Ken Liu Apr 13 '10 at 0:17
    
OMG.. people can understand nothing if you write like this.. format it properly. –  Broken Link Apr 13 '10 at 0:17
6  
I just noticed after the edit that you're also preparing the statements each time through the loop. The whole point is that you only need to prepare them once. –  Dean Harding Apr 13 '10 at 0:20
1  
sorry for the mistake in fact it was 2.45 for sol2 and 5 sec for prep statm –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 0:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

What you are doing wrong is that you are preparing the statement a thousand times and only run each prepared statement once. You should prepare it once, and run it a thousand times.

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1  
To be more clear, you should prepare it once, and then bind and execute it a thousand times. –  MJB Apr 13 '10 at 0:21
1  
That's what happens when people fail to understand the concept of invariants in loops :-/ –  luis.espinal Apr 13 '10 at 0:26
    
I put both prepared statements ouside the loop and now I have aprox 2.39 sec and in sol.2 I had 2.45. Is it normal? It is just a 3% improvement. –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 0:28
1  
You should run the tests some times so that the database is "warmed up". The database caches the result, so the second test will use the cached data from the first test, giving it an unfair advantage. Also, you are only measuring the execution time, which doesn't show the load on the database during the execution. –  Guffa Apr 13 '10 at 0:59
    
I see, so it's not the best test to measure the diff between prep statm and regular query. thank you very much –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 1:27

There's no benefit to preparing a statement inside a loop for a single execution. You're just adding overhead. Use prepared statements for queries you execute repeatedly usually with different parameters.

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yes indeed it was a huge mistake to put prepared stmt inside the loop but after I put both prepare otside the loop the result is 2.39sec wich is only 3% speed increase Shouldn't be more? –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 0:34
1  
not necessarily. The main saving is from composing a query plan for the query. If it's a trivial SQL statement, there's not much to save. Nothing really gets compiled so there really aren't any cpu cycles to speak of, and if your query is hitting the disk at all (i.e. the data isn't cached) that will quickly swamp any cycle savings - disk accesses are so much slower than cpu cycles. –  dkretz Apr 13 '10 at 0:38
    
the db is not that big it's only 42.000, but I was hoping for much more savings. But probably you have wright. –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 0:48
    
@le dorfier, thank you very much –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 1:28

In addition to the answers above...

I see you are using MySQL and below is the link from there as to prepared statements: http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/4.1/prepared-statements.html

An excerpt from there:

The increase in performance in prepared statements can come from a few different features. First is the need to only parse the query a single time. When you initially prepare the statement, MySQL will parse the statement to check the syntax and set up the query to be run. Then if you execute the query many times, it will no longer have that overhead. This pre-parsing can lead to a speed increase if you need to run the same query many times

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1  
Like I said, I know it was a big mistake to put them inside the loop, but after I put $con -> prepare() outside I get only 3-5% speed increase. i was expected much more, at least 20-30% speed increese. –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 0:41
    
Why would you expect such an arbitrary % in speed increase? Performance gains and their measurements do not work that way. That is completely dependent on the data size you are fetching and on the throughput (see my response for a better explanation.) –  luis.espinal Apr 13 '10 at 0:51
    
To add to that, I think you should expect gains on using prepared statements on the long run and health of your application in the form of less temporary objects created during parsing. Not on raw execution numbers. And since it is seldom known when and a how a query (or any piece of code) will be used over time, it is best practice to make them all prepared statements. –  luis.espinal Apr 13 '10 at 0:55
    
For sigure i'll use prep stmt, but I was thinking that maybe I was doing something wrong (beside puting prepre inside the loop which definitly was a huge mistake). And yes, my % for speed increase was based on what I readed on other tutorials and not on actual tests. Now I understant that I was expecting too much for this kind of tests. –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 1:20
    
@Romain Hippeau, thank you very much –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 1:29

@silversy -

Loop basics 101 (or plain coding 101): Move loop-invariant code out of the loops. Why would you prepare the statement in the loop when it takes no parameters that are dependent on the loop itself?

Of course it's going to suck gonads if you use prepared statements if you prepare them with each loop iteration. The overhead you observe is in the statement being initially prepared rather than in its execution.

Re-do your code as follows, and re-try again:

$stmt = $con -> prepare( " SELECT MAX(id) AS max_id , MIN(id) AS min_id FROM tb ");
$res = $con -> prepare( " SELECT * FROM tb WHERE id >= ? LIMIT 0,1 ");

for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {

  $stmt -> execute();
  $stmt->bind_result($M,$m);
  $stmt->free_result();
  $rand = mt_rand( $m , $M ).'<br/>';

  $res -> bind_param("s", $rand);
  $res -> execute();
  $res->free_result();
}


The caveat here, though, is that the difference between a prepared statement and a non-prepared one becomes negligible as the computation time to execute the query and fetch the data becomes large.

Just to pull some fictional numbers out of my @@@ for the sake of illustration:

Say that the query itself and the fetching of the data takes 0.01sec (call this A). Also, imagine that the construction and execution of the code behind a prepared statement takes 0.01sec (X) and for the unprepared query 0.05sec or 5 * 0.01 sec (Y = 5 * X). The ration between the prepared and unprepared code would be :

(A + Y)/(A + X) = 0.06sec/0.02sec = 3 -> unprepared execution is three times slower

And let's assume that for another query, the fetching time (due to data volume or network throughput) is 10secs (1000 * 0.01sec). Then the ratio changes

(A + Y)/(A + X) = 10.05sec/10.01sec ~=~ 1.004 

They are pretty much indistinguishable. What I'm trying to say is that yes, prepared statements are faster (and that you should use them), BUT the test you are implementing is not necessarily a good way to find that out or to gauge their value. You have to take other factors into account to really measure the performance you are squeezing out of them.

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@uis.espinal, thank you very much –  silversky Apr 13 '10 at 1:28

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