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Is there a canonical way to set up a JS onHover event with the existing onmouseover, onmouseout and some kind of timers? Or just any method to fire an arbitrary function if and only if user has hovered over element for certain amount of time.

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4 Answers 4

How about something like this?

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">

var HoverListener = {
  addElem: function( elem, callback, delay )
  {
    if ( delay === undefined )
    {
      delay = 1000;
    }

    var hoverTimer;

    addEvent( elem, 'mouseover', function()
    {
      hoverTimer = setTimeout( callback, delay );
    } );

    addEvent( elem, 'mouseout', function()
    {
      clearTimeout( hoverTimer );
    } );
  }
}

function tester()
{
  alert( 'hi' );
}

//  Generic event abstractor
function addEvent( obj, evt, fn )
{
  if ( 'undefined' != typeof obj.addEventListener )
  {
    obj.addEventListener( evt, fn, false );
  }
  else if ( 'undefined' != typeof obj.attachEvent )
  {
    obj.attachEvent( "on" + evt, fn );
  }
}

addEvent( window, 'load', function()
{
  HoverListener.addElem(
      document.getElementById( 'test' )
    , tester 
  );
  HoverListener.addElem(
      document.getElementById( 'test2' )
    , function()
      {
        alert( 'Hello World!' );
      }
    , 2300
  );
} );

</script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="test">Will alert "hi" on hover after one second</div>
<div id="test2">Will alert "Hello World!" on hover 2.3 seconds</div>
</body>
</html>
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2  
Does that actually work? typeof always returns a string. Even if it's the "undefined" string, it is a well-defined value, so comparation against undefined will never be equal. On FF (standard-compliance mode) at least, you need to compare against "undefined" when doing this kind of checks. Other than that, great answer that deserves a +1 even some years later ;) –  herenvardo Sep 9 '11 at 8:30

If you use the JQuery library you can use the .hover() event which merges the mouseover and mouseout event and helps you with the timing and child elements:

$(this).hover(function(){},function(){});

The first function is the start of the hover and the next is the end. Read more at: http://docs.jquery.com/Events/hover

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Great advice! I think it actually merges jQuery's mouseenter and mouseleave events (which are slightly different), by the way. –  Jo Liss Apr 21 '11 at 11:00

Can you clarify your question? What is "ohHover" in this case and how does it correspond to a delay in hover time?

That said, I think what you probably want is...

var timeout;
element.onmouseover = function(e) {
    timeout = setTimeout(function() {
        // ...
    }, delayTimeMs)
};
element.onmouseout = function(e) {
    if(timeout) {
        clearTimeout(timeout);
    }
};

Or addEventListener/attachEvent or your favorite library's event abstraction method.

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I don't think you need/want the timeout.

onhover (hover) would be defined as the time period while "over" something. IMHO

onmouseover = start...

onmouseout = ...end

For the record I've done some stuff with this to "fake" the hover event in IE6. It was rather expensive and in the end I ditched it in favor of performance.

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I expect the timeout is wanted to prevent events from occurring when the user simply passes the mouse over the element (such as by accident, or when moving to some other part of the interface. Imagine if click-to-open menus were also hover-to-open, but had no delay; then the user might be confronted with menus instantly opening on top of other things while the user is just trying to move the mouse across the page. –  IIsi 50MHz Dec 5 '10 at 21:42
    
@IIsi 50MHz - that's quite possible, especially if the onmouseout clears the timer similar to @Peter Bailey's answer above. At the time I answered, I was thinking that the OP was possibly confused as to how the mouse over/out/enter/leave events worked and was trying to make The Complicator's Gloves: thedailywtf.com/Articles/The_Complicator_0x27_s_Gloves.aspx –  scunliffe Dec 6 '10 at 11:46

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