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... the question says it all I believe!

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32  
When I'm the thread.start() method? :) –  Bill the Lizard Nov 4 '08 at 18:31
    
@blank, The answer is simply: t.run() when you want to run t's task on the current thread, and t.start() when you want to run t's task on thread t itself. Or are you asking for actual use cases? –  Pacerier Sep 26 at 2:24

13 Answers 13

up vote 79 down vote accepted

You might want to call run() in a particular unit test that is concerned strictly with functionality and not with concurrency.

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Just a note to the above great comments: sometimes your write a multi-thread code which uses "start" method to run different threads. You will find it much easier if you use "run" (instead of "start) for debugging since it makes the code to run synchronously and debugging it much easier.

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The separate start() and run() methods in the Thread class provide two ways to create threaded programs. The start() method starts the execution of the new thread and calls the run() method. The start() method returns immediately and the new thread normally continues until the run() method returns.

The Thread class’ run() method does nothing, so sub-classes should override the method with code to execute in the second thread. If a Thread is instantiated with a Runnable argument, the thread’s run() method executes the run() method of the Runnable object in the new thread instead.

Depending on the nature of your threaded program, calling the Thread run() method directly can give the same output as calling via the start() method, but in the latter case the code is actually executed in a new thread.

reference

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Same as Tomalak answer!!If you have referenced from some place please mention that !! –  Barry Oct 31 '11 at 19:19
    
The start() method returns immediately and the new thread normally continues until the run() method returns. If start() returns immediately how come the run() continues to run given that it was called itself from start() –  KNU Jul 30 at 12:55

Call thread.start(), it will in turn call thread.run(). Can't think of a case when you would want to bypass thread.start() and go directly to thread.run()

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3  
During testing is the only legitimate case I can think of. Otherwise, the contents of run() should be in a separate method that gets called by run, or by other means. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 4 '08 at 18:33

Executing thread.run() doesn't create a new Thread in which your code gets executed... It just executes the code in the currentThread from which the thread.run() code is invoked.

Executing thread.start() creates a new OS level thread wherein the run() method gets called.

In essense:

Single Threaded programming ==> Directly calling the `run()` method
Multi Threaded programming ==> Calling the `start()` method

Moreover, as other's have mentioned, 'testing' seems to be the only advisable case wherein you may invoke run() directly from your code.

Hope that helps!

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If the Question was - "why the thread start method is called instead of run method directly" then i have answered with an example code below. Hope that clarifies. In the Example below:

/*
By calling t1.start(), 
we are getting the main calling thread returned immediately 
after the t1.start() called and is ready to proceed for other 
operations.And the thread t1 starts executing the run method of the object r. 
Hence the the output will be:

      I am the main thread , i created thread t1 and had it execute run method, which is currently looping from 0 to 1000000

      I am done executing run method of testThread

*/


/* If we call t1.run() instead of t1.start(), (just replace t1.start() with t1.run() in the code for testing)
 its like a regular method call and the main thread will not return until the run method completes, 
 hence the output will be:

         I am done executing run method of testThread

         I am the main thread , i created thread t1 and had it execute run method, which is currently looping for i to 1000000

*/


class testThread implements Runnable{

 public void run()
 {
     for(int i=0;i<1000000;i++){} //a simple delay block to clarify.

     System.out.println("I am done executing run method of testThread");

 }  
}

public class mainClass{

   public static void main(String [] args)
    {
          testThread r = new testThread();
          Thread t1 = new Thread(r);
          t1.start();  /* Question is: can we call instead t1.run() */  
          System.out.println("I am the main thread , i created thread t1 and had it execute run method, which is currently looping for i to 1000000");

    }
}
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This has already been alluded to, but just to be clear: creating a new Thread object only to call it's run() method is needlessly expensive and should be a major red flag. It would be a much better, more decoupled design to create a Runnable impl and either (a) call it's run() method directly if that's the desired behavior, or (b) construct a new Thread with that Runnable and start the Thread.

Better yet, for even more decoupling, check out the Executor interface and framework in JDK 5 and newer. This allows you, in a nutshell, to decouple task execution (the Runnable instance) from how it is executed (the Executor implementation, which might execute the Runnable in the current Thread, in a new Thread, using an existing Thread from a pool, and whatnot).

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At least in the JVM 1.6., there's a bit of checking and run is called natively:

 public synchronized void start() {
        /**
     * This method is not invoked for the main method thread or "system"
     * group threads created/set up by the VM. Any new functionality added 
     * to this method in the future may have to also be added to the VM.
     *
     * A zero status value corresponds to state "NEW".
         */
        if (threadStatus != 0)
            throw new IllegalThreadStateException();
        group.add(this);
        start0();
        if (stopBeforeStart) {
        stop0(throwableFromStop);
    }
    }

    private native void start0();
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Assuming that you know the start and run method usage i.e. synchronous vs. asynchronous; run method can be used just to test the functionality.

Plus in some circumstances, the same thread class can be used in two different places with synch and asynch functionality requirements by having two different objects with one's run method and other's start method being invoked.

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If you want to execute the contents of run() like you would of any other method. Not to start a thread, of course.

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Taken form the Code Style Java threads FAQ:

Q: What's the difference between a thread's start() and run() methods?

A: The separate start() and run() methods in the Thread class provide two ways to create threaded programs. The start() method starts the execution of the new thread and calls the run() method. The start() method returns immediately and the new thread normally continues until the run() method returns.

The Thread class' run() method does nothing, so sub-classes should override the method with code to execute in the second thread. If a Thread is instantiated with a Runnable argument, the thread's run() method executes the run() method of the Runnable object in the new thread instead.

Depending on the nature of your threaded program, calling the Thread run() method directly can give the same output as calling via the start() method, but in the latter case the code is actually executed in a new thread.

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thread's run() method executes the run() method of the Runnable object in the new thread instead. That isn't true (or at least my Java 8 source code tells otherwise), but unfortunately the link seems broken so i report the mistake here instead. –  kajacx Jul 28 at 11:46
    
@Tomalak, This doesn't answer the question asked. The question is not asking for the difference, but asking about use cases whereby we will call thread.run() instead of thread.start(). –  Pacerier Sep 26 at 2:19

When you want it to run synchronously. Calling the run method won't actually give you multi-threading. The start method creates a new thread which calls the run method.

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Never. Calling run() directly just executes the code synchronously (in the same thread), just like a normal method call.

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11  
"Never" is a bit too absolute. Maybe don't always want a new thread, and still execute the code? –  Tomalak Nov 4 '08 at 18:51
4  
Maybe, but in that case it would be needlessly wasteful to create a new Thread only to call run() method. Better to create a Runnable impl and either run that in-thread or construct and start a new Thread with it. –  Scott Bale Nov 4 '08 at 19:20
1  
Just revisiting ... if never, why is the method public? –  blank Feb 27 '11 at 8:29
2  
It's public because Thread implements Runnable. You can subclass Thread and override run(), which has the same effect as putting your code in a Runnable and passing that into the Thread constructor. It's better practice to use a separate Runnable object, though, since that leaves you more flexibility (such as passing it to an Executor, etc.). –  Adam Crume Feb 27 '11 at 17:27
1  
Let me give a concrete example I'm currently working with: I have a program that can either be run as a GUI or from the command line. In the GUI case, I want the object that does the heavy lifting to run on a separate thread and send updates to the gui. In the command line mode, I don't need that separate thread. –  Edward Falk May 11 '11 at 1:05

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