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There doesn't appear to be a generic implementation of OrderedDictionary (which is in the System.Collections.Specialized namespace) in .NET 3.5. Is there one that I'm missing?

I've found implementations out there to provide the functionality, but wondered if/why there isn't a generic implementation out-of-the-box and if anyone knows whether it's something in .NET 4.0?

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1  
Here is an implementation of a OrderedDictionary<T>: codeproject.com/Articles/18615/… –  Tim Schmelter Feb 1 '12 at 21:54
1  
possible duplicate of Generic Key/Value pair collection in that preserves insertion order? –  nawfal Oct 31 '13 at 7:07
    
My implementation of OrderedDictionary<T> has O(1) insert/delete because it uses a LinkedList instead of ArrayList to maintain insertion order: clintonbrennan.com/2013/12/… –  Clinton Dec 20 '13 at 21:23
1  
If you just need to be able to iterate over the entries in the order they were added then List<KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue>> may be good enough. (Granted, not a general solution, but good enough for some purposes.) –  yoyo Jul 15 at 6:04
    
It's an unfortunate omission. There are other good data types Systems.Collections.Generic. Let's request OrderedDictionary<TKey,TValue> for .NET 5. As others have pointed out, the case the key is an int is degenerate, and will need special care. –  Colonel Panic Sep 30 at 11:02

11 Answers 11

up vote 24 down vote accepted

You're right. There's no generic equivalent of OrderedDictionary in the framework itself.

(That's still the case for .NET4 too, as far as I'm aware.)

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Thanks. Confirmed it quickest! –  AdaTheDev Apr 13 '10 at 13:16

Implementing a generic OrderedDictionary isn't terribly difficult, but it's unnecessarily time consuming and frankly this class is a huge oversight on Microsoft's part. There are multiple ways of doing this, but I chose to use a KeyedCollection for my internal storage. I also chose to implement various methods for sorting the way that List<T> does since this is essentially a hybrid IList and IDictionary. I've included my implementation here for posterity.

Here's the interface. Notice that it includes System.Collections.Specialized.IOrderedDictionary, which is the non-generic version of this interface that was provided by Microsoft.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

namespace mattmc3.Common.Collections.Generic {

    public interface IOrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, IOrderedDictionary {
        new TValue this[int index] { get; set; }
        new TValue this[TKey key] { get; set; }
        new int Count { get; }
        new ICollection<TKey> Keys { get; }
        new ICollection<TValue> Values { get; }
        new void Add(TKey key, TValue value);
        new void Clear();
        void Insert(int index, TKey key, TValue value);
        int IndexOf(TKey key);
        bool ContainsValue(TValue value);
        bool ContainsValue(TValue value, IEqualityComparer<TValue> comparer);
        new bool ContainsKey(TKey key);
        new IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator();
        new bool Remove(TKey key);
        new void RemoveAt(int index);
        new bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value);
        TValue GetValue(TKey key);
        void SetValue(TKey key, TValue value);
        KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> GetItem(int index);
        void SetItem(int index, TValue value);
    }

}

Here's the implementation along with helper classes:

using System;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Specialized;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace mattmc3.Common.Collections.Generic {

    /// <summary>
    /// A dictionary object that allows rapid hash lookups using keys, but also
    /// maintains the key insertion order so that values can be retrieved by
    /// key index.
    /// </summary>
    public class OrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IOrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> {

        #region Fields/Properties

        private KeyedCollection2<TKey, KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> _keyedCollection;

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the value associated with the specified key.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="key">The key associated with the value to get or set.</param>
        public TValue this[TKey key] {
            get {
                return GetValue(key);
            }
            set {
                SetValue(key, value);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the value at the specified index.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="index">The index of the value to get or set.</param>
        public TValue this[int index] {
            get {
                return GetItem(index).Value;
            }
            set {
                SetItem(index, value);
            }
        }

        public int Count {
            get { return _keyedCollection.Count; }
        }

        public ICollection<TKey> Keys {
            get {
                return _keyedCollection.Select(x => x.Key).ToList();
            }
        }

        public ICollection<TValue> Values {
            get {
                return _keyedCollection.Select(x => x.Value).ToList();
            }
        }

        public IEqualityComparer<TKey> Comparer {
            get;
            private set;
        }

        #endregion

        #region Constructors

        public OrderedDictionary() {
            Initialize();
        }

        public OrderedDictionary(IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer) {
            Initialize(comparer);
        }

        public OrderedDictionary(IOrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary) {
            Initialize();
            foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> pair in dictionary) {
                _keyedCollection.Add(pair);
            }
        }

        public OrderedDictionary(IOrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer) {
            Initialize(comparer);
            foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> pair in dictionary) {
                _keyedCollection.Add(pair);
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region Methods

        private void Initialize(IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer = null) {
            this.Comparer = comparer;
            if (comparer != null) {
                _keyedCollection = new KeyedCollection2<TKey, KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>(x => x.Key, comparer);
            }
            else {
                _keyedCollection = new KeyedCollection2<TKey, KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>(x => x.Key);
            }
        }

        public void Add(TKey key, TValue value) {
            _keyedCollection.Add(new KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>(key, value));
        }

        public void Clear() {
            _keyedCollection.Clear();
        }

        public void Insert(int index, TKey key, TValue value) {
            _keyedCollection.Insert(index, new KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>(key, value));
        }

        public int IndexOf(TKey key) {
            if (_keyedCollection.Contains(key)) {
                return _keyedCollection.IndexOf(_keyedCollection[key]);
            }
            else {
                return -1;
            }
        }

        public bool ContainsValue(TValue value) {
            return this.Values.Contains(value);
        }

        public bool ContainsValue(TValue value, IEqualityComparer<TValue> comparer) {
            return this.Values.Contains(value, comparer);
        }

        public bool ContainsKey(TKey key) {
            return _keyedCollection.Contains(key);
        }

        public KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> GetItem(int index) {
            if (index < 0 || index >= _keyedCollection.Count) {
                throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("The index was outside the bounds of the dictionary: {0}", index));
            }
            return _keyedCollection[index];
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sets the value at the index specified.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="index">The index of the value desired</param>
        /// <param name="value">The value to set</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentOutOfRangeException">
        /// Thrown when the index specified does not refer to a KeyValuePair in this object
        /// </exception>
        public void SetItem(int index, TValue value) {
            if (index < 0 || index >= _keyedCollection.Count) {
                throw new ArgumentException("The index is outside the bounds of the dictionary: {0}".FormatWith(index));
            }
            var kvp = new KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>(_keyedCollection[index].Key, value);
            _keyedCollection[index] = kvp;
        }

        public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator() {
            return _keyedCollection.GetEnumerator();
        }

        public bool Remove(TKey key) {
            return _keyedCollection.Remove(key);
        }

        public void RemoveAt(int index) {
            if (index < 0 || index >= _keyedCollection.Count) {
                throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("The index was outside the bounds of the dictionary: {0}", index));
            }
            _keyedCollection.RemoveAt(index);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the value associated with the specified key.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="key">The key associated with the value to get.</param>
        public TValue GetValue(TKey key) {
            if (_keyedCollection.Contains(key) == false) {
                throw new ArgumentException("The given key is not present in the dictionary: {0}".FormatWith(key));
            }
            var kvp = _keyedCollection[key];
            return kvp.Value;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sets the value associated with the specified key.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="key">The key associated with the value to set.</param>
        /// <param name="value">The the value to set.</param>
        public void SetValue(TKey key, TValue value) {
            var kvp = new KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>(key, value);
            var idx = IndexOf(key);
            if (idx > -1) {
                _keyedCollection[idx] = kvp;
            }
            else {
                _keyedCollection.Add(kvp);
            }
        }

        public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value) {
            if (_keyedCollection.Contains(key)) {
                value = _keyedCollection[key].Value;
                return true;
            }
            else {
                value = default(TValue);
                return false;
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region sorting
        public void SortKeys() {
            _keyedCollection.SortByKeys();
        }

        public void SortKeys(IComparer<TKey> comparer) {
            _keyedCollection.SortByKeys(comparer);
        }

        public void SortKeys(Comparison<TKey> comparison) {
            _keyedCollection.SortByKeys(comparison);
        }

        public void SortValues() {
            var comparer = Comparer<TValue>.Default;
            SortValues(comparer);
        }

        public void SortValues(IComparer<TValue> comparer) {
            _keyedCollection.Sort((x, y) => comparer.Compare(x.Value, y.Value));
        }

        public void SortValues(Comparison<TValue> comparison) {
            _keyedCollection.Sort((x, y) => comparison(x.Value, y.Value));
        }
        #endregion

        #region IDictionary<TKey, TValue>

        void IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.Add(TKey key, TValue value) {
            Add(key, value);
        }

        bool IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.ContainsKey(TKey key) {
            return ContainsKey(key);
        }

        ICollection<TKey> IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.Keys {
            get { return Keys; }
        }

        bool IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.Remove(TKey key) {
            return Remove(key);
        }

        bool IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value) {
            return TryGetValue(key, out value);
        }

        ICollection<TValue> IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.Values {
            get { return Values; }
        }

        TValue IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.this[TKey key] {
            get {
                return this[key];
            }
            set {
                this[key] = value;
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>

        void ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Add(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item) {
            _keyedCollection.Add(item);
        }

        void ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Clear() {
            _keyedCollection.Clear();
        }

        bool ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Contains(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item) {
            return _keyedCollection.Contains(item);
        }

        void ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int arrayIndex) {
            _keyedCollection.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
        }

        int ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Count {
            get { return _keyedCollection.Count; }
        }

        bool ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.IsReadOnly {
            get { return false; }
        }

        bool ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Remove(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item) {
            return _keyedCollection.Remove(item);
        }

        #endregion

        #region IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>

        IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.GetEnumerator() {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        #endregion

        #region IEnumerable

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        #endregion

        #region IOrderedDictionary

        IDictionaryEnumerator IOrderedDictionary.GetEnumerator() {
            return new DictionaryEnumerator<TKey, TValue>(this);
        }

        void IOrderedDictionary.Insert(int index, object key, object value) {
            Insert(index, (TKey)key, (TValue)value);
        }

        void IOrderedDictionary.RemoveAt(int index) {
            RemoveAt(index);
        }

        object IOrderedDictionary.this[int index] {
            get {
                return this[index];
            }
            set {
                this[index] = (TValue)value;
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region IDictionary

        void IDictionary.Add(object key, object value) {
            Add((TKey)key, (TValue)value);
        }

        void IDictionary.Clear() {
            Clear();
        }

        bool IDictionary.Contains(object key) {
            return _keyedCollection.Contains((TKey)key);
        }

        IDictionaryEnumerator IDictionary.GetEnumerator() {
            return new DictionaryEnumerator<TKey, TValue>(this);
        }

        bool IDictionary.IsFixedSize {
            get { return false; }
        }

        bool IDictionary.IsReadOnly {
            get { return false; }
        }

        ICollection IDictionary.Keys {
            get { return (ICollection)this.Keys; }
        }

        void IDictionary.Remove(object key) {
            Remove((TKey)key);
        }

        ICollection IDictionary.Values {
            get { return (ICollection)this.Values; }
        }

        object IDictionary.this[object key] {
            get {
                return this[(TKey)key];
            }
            set {
                this[(TKey)key] = (TValue)value;
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region ICollection

        void ICollection.CopyTo(Array array, int index) {
            ((ICollection)_keyedCollection).CopyTo(array, index);
        }

        int ICollection.Count {
            get { return ((ICollection)_keyedCollection).Count; }
        }

        bool ICollection.IsSynchronized {
            get { return ((ICollection)_keyedCollection).IsSynchronized; }
        }

        object ICollection.SyncRoot {
            get { return ((ICollection)_keyedCollection).SyncRoot; }
        }

        #endregion
    }

    public class KeyedCollection2<TKey, TItem> : KeyedCollection<TKey, TItem> {
        private const string DelegateNullExceptionMessage = "Delegate passed cannot be null";
        private Func<TItem, TKey> _getKeyForItemDelegate;

        public KeyedCollection2(Func<TItem, TKey> getKeyForItemDelegate)
            : base() {
            if (getKeyForItemDelegate == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(DelegateNullExceptionMessage);
            _getKeyForItemDelegate = getKeyForItemDelegate;
        }

        public KeyedCollection2(Func<TItem, TKey> getKeyForItemDelegate, IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer)
            : base(comparer) {
            if (getKeyForItemDelegate == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(DelegateNullExceptionMessage);
            _getKeyForItemDelegate = getKeyForItemDelegate;
        }

        protected override TKey GetKeyForItem(TItem item) {
            return _getKeyForItemDelegate(item);
        }

        public void SortByKeys() {
            var comparer = Comparer<TKey>.Default;
            SortByKeys(comparer);
        }

        public void SortByKeys(IComparer<TKey> keyComparer) {
            var comparer = new Comparer2<TItem>((x, y) => keyComparer.Compare(GetKeyForItem(x), GetKeyForItem(y)));
            Sort(comparer);
        }

        public void SortByKeys(Comparison<TKey> keyComparison) {
            var comparer = new Comparer2<TItem>((x, y) => keyComparison(GetKeyForItem(x), GetKeyForItem(y)));
            Sort(comparer);
        }

        public void Sort() {
            var comparer = Comparer<TItem>.Default;
            Sort(comparer);
        }

        public void Sort(Comparison<TItem> comparison) {
            var newComparer = new Comparer2<TItem>((x, y) => comparison(x, y));
            Sort(newComparer);
        }

        public void Sort(IComparer<TItem> comparer) {
            List<TItem> list = base.Items as List<TItem>;
            if (list != null) {
                list.Sort(comparer);
            }
        }
    }

    public class Comparer2<T> : Comparer<T> {
        //private readonly Func<T, T, int> _compareFunction;
        private readonly Comparison<T> _compareFunction;

        #region Constructors

        public Comparer2(Comparison<T> comparison) {
            if (comparison == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("comparison");
            _compareFunction = comparison;
        }

        #endregion

        public override int Compare(T arg1, T arg2) {
            return _compareFunction(arg1, arg2);
        }
    }

    public class DictionaryEnumerator<TKey, TValue> : IDictionaryEnumerator, IDisposable {
        readonly IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> impl;
        public void Dispose() { impl.Dispose(); }
        public DictionaryEnumerator(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> value) {
            this.impl = value.GetEnumerator();
        }
        public void Reset() { impl.Reset(); }
        public bool MoveNext() { return impl.MoveNext(); }
        public DictionaryEntry Entry {
            get {
                var pair = impl.Current;
                return new DictionaryEntry(pair.Key, pair.Value);
            }
        }
        public object Key { get { return impl.Current.Key; } }
        public object Value { get { return impl.Current.Value; } }
        public object Current { get { return Entry; } }
    }
}

And no implementation would be complete without a few tests (but tragically, SO won't let me post that much code in one post), so I'll have to leave you to write your tests. But, I left a few of them in so that you could get an idea of how it works:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using mattmc3.Common.Collections.Generic;

namespace mattmc3.Tests.Common.Collections.Generic {
    [TestClass]
    public class OrderedDictionaryTests {

        private OrderedDictionary<string, string> GetAlphabetDictionary(IEqualityComparer<string> comparer = null) {
            OrderedDictionary<string, string> alphabet = (comparer == null ? new OrderedDictionary<string, string>() : new OrderedDictionary<string, string>(comparer));
            for (var a = Convert.ToInt32('a'); a <= Convert.ToInt32('z'); a++) {
                var c = Convert.ToChar(a);
                alphabet.Add(c.ToString(), c.ToString().ToUpper());
            }
            Assert.AreEqual(26, alphabet.Count);
            return alphabet;
        }

        private List<KeyValuePair<string, string>> GetAlphabetList() {
            var alphabet = new List<KeyValuePair<string, string>>();
            for (var a = Convert.ToInt32('a'); a <= Convert.ToInt32('z'); a++) {
                var c = Convert.ToChar(a);
                alphabet.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, string>(c.ToString(), c.ToString().ToUpper()));
            }
            Assert.AreEqual(26, alphabet.Count);
            return alphabet;
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestAdd() {
            var od = new OrderedDictionary<string, string>();
            Assert.AreEqual(0, od.Count);
            Assert.AreEqual(-1, od.IndexOf("foo"));

            od.Add("foo", "bar");
            Assert.AreEqual(1, od.Count);
            Assert.AreEqual(0, od.IndexOf("foo"));
            Assert.AreEqual(od[0], "bar");
            Assert.AreEqual(od["foo"], "bar");
            Assert.AreEqual(od.GetItem(0).Key, "foo");
            Assert.AreEqual(od.GetItem(0).Value, "bar");
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestRemove() {
            var od = new OrderedDictionary<string, string>();

            od.Add("foo", "bar");
            Assert.AreEqual(1, od.Count);

            od.Remove("foo");
            Assert.AreEqual(0, od.Count);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestRemoveAt() {
            var od = new OrderedDictionary<string, string>();

            od.Add("foo", "bar");
            Assert.AreEqual(1, od.Count);

            od.RemoveAt(0);
            Assert.AreEqual(0, od.Count);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestClear() {
            var od = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            Assert.AreEqual(26, od.Count);
            od.Clear();
            Assert.AreEqual(0, od.Count);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestOrderIsPreserved() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            var alphabetList = GetAlphabetList();
            Assert.AreEqual(26, alphabetDict.Count);
            Assert.AreEqual(26, alphabetList.Count);

            var keys = alphabetDict.Keys.ToList();
            var values = alphabetDict.Values.ToList();

            for (var i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
                var dictItem = alphabetDict.GetItem(i);
                var listItem = alphabetList[i];
                var key = keys[i];
                var value = values[i];

                Assert.AreEqual(dictItem, listItem);
                Assert.AreEqual(key, listItem.Key);
                Assert.AreEqual(value, listItem.Value);
            }
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestTryGetValue() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            string result = null;
            Assert.IsFalse(alphabetDict.TryGetValue("abc", out result));
            Assert.IsNull(result);
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.TryGetValue("z", out result));
            Assert.AreEqual("Z", result);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestEnumerator() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();

            var keys = alphabetDict.Keys.ToList();
            Assert.AreEqual(26, keys.Count);

            var i = 0;
            foreach (var kvp in alphabetDict) {
                var value = alphabetDict[kvp.Key];
                Assert.AreEqual(kvp.Value, value);
                i++;
            }
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestInvalidIndex() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            try {
                var notGonnaWork = alphabetDict[100];
                Assert.IsTrue(false, "Exception should have thrown");
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                Assert.IsTrue(ex.Message.Contains("index is outside the bounds"));
            }
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMissingKey() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            try {
                var notGonnaWork = alphabetDict["abc"];
                Assert.IsTrue(false, "Exception should have thrown");
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                Assert.IsTrue(ex.Message.Contains("key is not present"));
            }
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestUpdateExistingValue() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.ContainsKey("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(2, alphabetDict.IndexOf("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(alphabetDict[2], "C");
            alphabetDict[2] = "CCC";
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.ContainsKey("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(2, alphabetDict.IndexOf("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(alphabetDict[2], "CCC");
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestInsertValue() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.ContainsKey("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(2, alphabetDict.IndexOf("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(alphabetDict[2], "C");
            Assert.AreEqual(26, alphabetDict.Count);
            Assert.IsFalse(alphabetDict.ContainsValue("ABC"));

            alphabetDict.Insert(2, "abc", "ABC");
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.ContainsKey("c"));
            Assert.AreEqual(2, alphabetDict.IndexOf("abc"));
            Assert.AreEqual(alphabetDict[2], "ABC");
            Assert.AreEqual(27, alphabetDict.Count);
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.ContainsValue("ABC"));
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestValueComparer() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            Assert.IsFalse(alphabetDict.ContainsValue("a"));
            Assert.IsTrue(alphabetDict.ContainsValue("a", StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase));
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestSortByKeys() {
            var alphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            var reverseAlphabetDict = GetAlphabetDictionary();
            Comparison<string> stringReverse = ((x, y) => (String.Equals(x, y) ? 0 : String.Compare(x, y) >= 1 ? -1 : 1));
            reverseAlphabetDict.SortKeys(stringReverse);
            for (int j = 0, k = 25; j < alphabetDict.Count; j++, k--) {
                var ascValue = alphabetDict.GetItem(j);
                var dscValue = reverseAlphabetDict.GetItem(k);
                Assert.AreEqual(ascValue.Key, dscValue.Key);
                Assert.AreEqual(ascValue.Value, dscValue.Value);
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
5  
+1 for including tests :) –  dahvyd Sep 27 '12 at 20:50
5  
By public domain, are you asking if you can use it, modify it, and treat it like it's yours worry free - yes. Feel free. If you mean license it and host it somewhere - no... it lives here on SO only for now. –  mattmc3 Mar 5 '13 at 3:43
2  
@mattmc3 Thank you for your code sir, but your comment on public domain issues concerns me, when you said in the comment: "If you mean license it and host it somewhere - no... it lives here on SO only for now." With all respect (truly meant) to the author, do you really have a right to make that restriction, once you've posted the code on SO??? E.g. do any of us really have the right to restrict our code on SO from being posted, for instance, as a git gist? Anyone? –  Nicholas Petersen Sep 8 '13 at 16:30
1  
What if TKey is int? How this[] will work in such a case? –  V.B. Nov 20 '13 at 6:36
1  
As @supercat says below, this is probably one of the reasons OD is not generic. In OD a call to this[obj] is clearly differentiated from this[int] –  V.B. Nov 21 '13 at 4:34

For the record, there is a generic KeyedCollection that allows objects to be indexed by an int and a key. The key must be embeded in the value.

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1  
This does not maintain the order of initialization like OrderedDictionary! Check out my answer. –  JoelFan Dec 21 '11 at 17:30
5  
It does maintain the order of add/insertion. –  Guillaume Dec 22 '11 at 8:55
    
yes it does.. where do you guys got this notion that the keyedcollection sorts items... i am stumbled upon this second time –  Boppity Bop Jan 20 '13 at 20:12

For what it's worth, here is how I solved it (edited to improve my first attempt):

public class PairList<TKey, TValue> : List<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>
{
    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        Add(new KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>(key, value));
    }
}

It can be initialized like this:

var pairList = new PairList<string, string>
    {
        { "pitcher", "Ken" },
        { "catcher", "Brad"},
        { "left fielder", "Stan"},
    };

and accessed like this:

foreach (var pair in pairList)
{
    Console.WriteLine("position: {0}, player: {1}",
        pair.Key, pair.Value);            
}

// guaranteed to print in the order of initialization
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1  
Thanks! I hadn't realised that collection initialisers were just special syntax for Add methods. –  Sam Oct 19 '12 at 2:56
3  
This isn't a dictionary. Dictionary stands for keyed indexing and no duplicate keys. –  nawfal Oct 31 '13 at 7:10
    
yet if you happen to not need indexing by key (which isn't too hard to add) and dupliacte keys this comes in handy –  stijn May 16 at 16:06

Here's a bizarre find: the System.Web.Util namespace in System.Web.Extensions.dll contains a generic OrderedDictionary

// Type: System.Web.Util.OrderedDictionary`2
// Assembly: System.Web.Extensions, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35
// Assembly location: C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\System.Web.Extensions.dll

namespace System.Web.Util
{
    internal class OrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IEnumerable

Not sure why MS placed it there instead of the System.Collections.Generic package, but I assume you can simply copy paste the code and use it (it's internal, so can't use it directly). Looks like the implementation uses a standard dictionary and separate Key/Value lists. Pretty straightforward...

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1  
System.Runtime.Collections also contains an internal OrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> which just wraps around the non-generic version –  V.B. Nov 21 '13 at 4:38

A major conceptual problem with a generic version of OrderedDictionary is that users of a OrderedDictionary<TKey,TValue> would expect expect to be able to index it either numerically using an int, or by lookup using a TKey. When the only type of key was Object, as was the case with non-generic OrderedDictionary, the type of argument passed to the indexer would be sufficient to distinguish whether what type of indexing operation should be performed. As it is, though, it's unclear how the indexer of an OrderedDictionary<int, TValue> should behave.

If classes like Drawing.Point had recommended and followed a rule that piecewise-mutable structures should expose their mutable elements as fields rather than properties, and refrain from using property setters that modify this, then an OrderedDictionary<TKey,TValue> could efficiently expose a ByIndex property that returned an Indexer struct which held a reference to the dictionary, and had an indexed property whose getter and setter would call GetByIndex and SetByIndex upon it. Thus, one could say something like MyDict.ByIndex[5] += 3; to add 3 to the 6th element of the dictionary. Unfortunately, for the compiler to accept such a thing, it would be necessary to make the ByIndex property return a new class instance rather than a struct every time it's invoked, eliminating the advantages one would get by avoiding boxing. In vb.net, one could get around that issue by using a named indexed property (so MyDict.ByIndex[int] would be a member of MyDict, rather than requiring MyDict.ByIndex to be a member of MyDict which includes an indexer), but C# doesn't allow such things.

It might still have been worthwhile to offer an OrderedDictionary<TKey,TValue> where TKey:class, but much of the reason for providing generics in the first place was to allow their use with value types.

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For a lot of purposes I've found one can get by with a List<KeyValuePair<K, V>>. (Not if you need it to extend Dictionary, obviously, and not if you need better than O(n) key-value lookup.)

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Just came to the same conclusion myself! –  Peter Mar 31 '11 at 8:31
    
But that has an awkward initialization syntax... check out my answer –  JoelFan Dec 21 '11 at 17:25
    
And you don't get the convenient .Values and .Keys properties. –  Pat Jul 30 '12 at 19:52
1  
As I said, "for a lot of purposes." –  David Moles Jul 30 '12 at 23:01
2  
You could also use a Tuple<T1, T2> if they don't have a key-value relationship. –  cdmckay May 8 '13 at 15:00

Right, I miss Python's OrderedDict

A dictionary that remembers the order that keys were first inserted. If a new entry overwrites an existing entry, the original insertion position is left unchanged. Deleting an entry and reinserting it will move it to the end.

So I wrote my own OrderedDictionary<K,V> class in C#. How does it work? It maintains two collections - a vanilla unordered dictionary and an ordered list of keys. With this solution, the standard dictionary operations keep their fast complexities, and look up by index is fast too.

https://gist.github.com/matt-hickford/5137384

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There is SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>. Although semantically close, I am not claiming it's the same as OrderedDictionary simply because they are not. Even from performance characteristics. However the very interesting and quite important difference between Dictionary<TKey, TValue> (and to that extent OrderedDictionary and implementations provided in answers) and SortedDictionary is that the latter is using binary tree underneath. This is critical distinction because it makes the class immune to memory constraints applied to generic class. See this thread about OutOfMemoryExceptions thrown when generic class is used for handling large set of key-value pairs.

What is a limit for capacity passed to Dictionary constructor?

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I implemented generic OrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> by wraping around SortedList<TKey, TValue> and adding private Dictionary<TKey, int> _order. Then I created internal implementation of Comparer<TKey> passing reference to the _order dictionary. Then I use this comparer for internal SortedList. This class keeps order of elements passed to constructor and order of additions.

This implementation has almost the same BigO characteristics as SortedList<TKey, TValue> since Adding and Removing to _order is O(1). Each element will take (according to the book 'C# 4 in a Nutshell', p. 292, table 7-1) additional memory space of 22 (overhead) + 4 (int order) + TKey size (let assume 8) = 34. Together with SortedList<TKey, TValue> overhead of 2 bytes the total overhead is 36 bytes, while the same book says that non-generic OrderedDictionary has overhead of 59 bytes.

If I pass sorted=true to constructor, then _order is not used at all, the OrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue> is exactly SortedList<TKey, TValue> with minor overhead for wrapping, if at all meaningful.

I am going to store not-so-many large reference objects in the OrderedDictionary<TKey, TValue>, so for me this c.36 bytes overhead is tolerable.

The main code is below. The complete updated code is on this gist.

public class OrderedList<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, IDictionary
{
    private readonly Dictionary<TKey, int> _order;
    private readonly SortedList<TKey, TValue> _internalList;

    private readonly bool _sorted;
    private readonly OrderComparer _comparer;

    public OrderedList(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, bool sorted = false)
    {
        _sorted = sorted;

        if (dictionary == null) dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();

        if (_sorted)
        {
            _internalList = new SortedList<TKey, TValue>(dictionary);
        }
        else
        {
            _order = new Dictionary<TKey, int>();
            _comparer = new OrderComparer(ref _order);
            _internalList = new SortedList<TKey, TValue>(_comparer);
            // keep prder of the IDictionary
            foreach (var kvp in dictionary)
            {
                Add(kvp);
            }
        }
    }

    public OrderedList(bool sorted = false)
        : this(null, sorted)
    {
    }

    private class OrderComparer : Comparer<TKey>
    {
        public Dictionary<TKey, int> Order { get; set; }

        public OrderComparer(ref Dictionary<TKey, int> order)
        {
            Order = order;
        }

        public override int Compare(TKey x, TKey y)
        {
            var xo = Order[x];
            var yo = Order[y];
            return xo.CompareTo(yo);
        }
    }

    private void ReOrder()
    {
        var i = 0;
        _order = _order.OrderBy(kvp => kvp.Value).ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => i++);
        _comparer.Order = _order;
        _lastOrder = _order.Values.Max() + 1;
    }

    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        if (!_sorted)
        {
            _order.Add(key, _lastOrder);
            _lastOrder++;
            //very rare event
            if (_lastOrder == int.MaxValue) ReOrder();
        }

        _internalList.Add(key, value);
    }

    public bool Remove(TKey key)
    {
        var result = _internalList.Remove(key);
        if (!_sorted) _order.Remove(key);
        return result;
    }

    // Other IDictionary<> + IDictionary members implementation wrapping around _internalList
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
There are at least four different usage cases I can see for something like OrderedDictionary, with regard to insertions or deletions: (1) There will never be any deletions; (2) there will be deletions, but what is important is that items enumerate in the order added; there is no need for access by index; (3) the numerical index of an item should (or at least may) remain constant, and no more than 2 billion items will be added during the lifetime of the collection, so if item #7 is removed, there will never again be an item #7; (4) an item's index should be its rank with respect to survivors. –  supercat Jun 22 '13 at 18:17
    
Scenarios #1 could be handled by using an array in parallel with the Dictionary. Scenarios #2 and #3 could be handled by having each item maintain an index saying when it was added and links to items added before or after it. Scenario #4 is the only one which would seem like it shouldn't be able to achieve O(1) performance for operations in arbitrary sequence. Depending upon usage patterns, #4 may be helped by using various lazy update strategies (keep counts in a tree, and have changes to a node invalidate rather than update the node and its parents). –  supercat Jun 22 '13 at 18:26
1  
Internal SortedList has elements in insertion order due to use of custom comparer. It may be slow but your comment about enumeration is wrong. Show the tests about enumeration... –  V.B. May 1 at 14:02
1  
What line with ToDictionary you are talking about? It doesn't affect internal list, but only order dictionary. –  V.B. May 1 at 14:10
1  
@V.B. Apologies, I missed both. As such haven't tested it. Then the only problem would be with addition. Two dictionary lookups, as well as two insertions. I will cancel the downvote. –  nawfal May 1 at 14:14

I'm not sure if I misunderstood your question, but there is a .NET implementation of OrderedDictionary in System.Collections.Generic.OrderedDictionary apparently available since .NET 2.0, the reference is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f7fta44c%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

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1  
Your link points to System.Collections.Generic. SortedDictionary, a dictionary that sorts the elements according to their key; which is not the same as an OrderedDictionary that preserves the order in which the elements were added –  HugoRune Sep 24 '13 at 15:34

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