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Is there a simpler way to rewrite the following condition in JavaScript?

if ((x == 1) || (x == 3) || (x == 4) || (x == 17) || (x == 80)) {...}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You could use an array of valid values and test it with indexOf:

if ([1, 3, 4, 17, 80].indexOf(x) != -1)

Edit    Note that indexOf was just added in ECMAScript 5 and thus is not implemented in every browser. But you can use the following code to add it if missing:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf)
{
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(elt /*, from*/)
  {
    var len = this.length >>> 0;

    var from = Number(arguments[1]) || 0;
    from = (from < 0)
         ? Math.ceil(from)
         : Math.floor(from);
    if (from < 0)
      from += len;

    for (; from < len; from++)
    {
      if (from in this &&
          this[from] === elt)
        return from;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}

Or, if you’re already using a JavaScript framework, you can also use its implementation of that method.

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Great, this is what I was looking for ! Thanks ! –  Misha Moroshko Apr 13 '10 at 14:44
    
+1... This is the neatest. The in operator does not work correctly for arrays, as you suggested: developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/… –  Daniel Vassallo Apr 13 '10 at 14:45
    
+1 innovative! ugly but interesting –  BritishDeveloper Apr 13 '10 at 14:45
    
@sterofrog: You can add indexOf to older browsers: developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/… –  Daniel Vassallo Apr 13 '10 at 14:49
    
@Daniel: yes, this should be added to the answer, for gooogler's benefit –  user187291 Apr 13 '10 at 15:07
switch (x) {
    case 1:
    case 3:
    case 4:
    case 17:
    case 80:
        //code
        break;
    default:
        //code
}
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2  
not exactly simpler, but a nice alternative, and good use of not using a break, which btw you forgot to put after the code in case 80: –  thecoshman Apr 13 '10 at 14:37
    
and you need the break in the default case –  BritishDeveloper Apr 13 '10 at 14:42
    
I've made the edits you suggested. Thanks! –  Yongho Apr 13 '10 at 14:44
    
@BritishDeveloper the default clause doesn't require a break, as there cannot be any cases after the default. For example, see w3schools.com/js/js_switch.asp –  cmptrgeekken Apr 13 '10 at 15:04
    
@cmptrgeekken true - i had my c# eyes in –  BritishDeveloper Apr 13 '10 at 16:13

This is a little function I found somewhere on the web:

function oc(a) {
    var o = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        o[a[i]] = '';
    }
    return o;
}

Used like this:

if (x in oc(1, 3, 4, 17, 80)) {...}

I'm using it for strings myself; haven't tried with numbers, but I guess it would work.

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Updated my answer. –  Edgar Apr 15 '10 at 7:42

a regular expression test uses the string value of x:

if(/^[134]|17|80$/.test(x)){/*...*/}
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You can optimize your own example and get rid of a few characters, making it easier on the eyes..:

if (x == 1 || x == 3 || x == 4 || x == 17 || x == 80) { ... }
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many options

if ([0, 1, 3, 4, 17, 80].indexOf(x) > 0)

if(/^(1|3|4|17|80)$/.test(x))

if($.inArray(x, [1, 3, 4, 17, 80]) 

another one, based on Ed's answer

function list() {
    for (var i = 0, o = {}; i < arguments.length; i++)
        o[arguments[i]] = '';
    return o;
}


if(x in list(1, 3, 4, 17, 80))...
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1  
JavaScript’s array index starts with 0. –  Gumbo Apr 13 '10 at 14:44
    
@Gumbo: really? ;/ –  user187291 Apr 13 '10 at 14:47
    
@stereofrog: Yes: [0, 1, 3, 4, 17, 80].indexOf(0) === 0. –  Gumbo Apr 13 '10 at 14:50
    
@Gumbo: and...? –  user187291 Apr 13 '10 at 15:04
    
@stereofrog: so, I think if ([0, 1, 3, 4, 17, 80].indexOf(x) > 0) needs to be if ([0, 1, 3, 4, 17, 80].indexOf(x) >= 0) –  Daniel Vassallo Apr 13 '10 at 15:34

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