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I need to delete duplicated rows for specified sid on a mysql table.

How can I do this with an SQL query?

DELETE (DUPLICATED TITLES) FROM table WHERE SID = "1"

Something like this, but I don't know how to do it.

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Do you only need to do it once or do you need to do it all the time? –  Billy ONeal Apr 13 '10 at 14:44
    
Do the records with the duplicate records all have the same data, or are the rest of the fields different from each other? If you have the first option you can simply delete all the records but one, if you have the second option, how are you determining which record you want to keep? –  Lex Apr 13 '10 at 14:46
    
@Lex First option. @Billy I need to do it all the time. –  Ali Demirci Apr 13 '10 at 14:55
    
I found that this answer worked better: stackoverflow.com/questions/4685173/… –  Talifhani Luvhengo Feb 14 '13 at 10:20
    
possible duplicate of Remove duplicate rows in MySQL –  Basilevs Sep 16 at 16:16

6 Answers 6

this removes duplicates in place, without making a new table

ALTER IGNORE TABLE foobar ADD UNIQUE (title, SID)

note: only works well if index fits in memory

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2  
Worked great for me! –  Michael Ozeryansky Jun 28 '12 at 3:57
1  
For me too. Quite easy! –  robsch Sep 19 '12 at 12:14
7  
Notice: this would keep the oldest duplicate record and would erase the newer ones. If you want to keep the newest you cannot do this with ALTER IGNORE. –  Haralan Dobrev Oct 1 '12 at 10:26
2  
Doesn't seem to work with InnoDB. I ran ALTER TABLE foo ENGINE MyISAM to work around it, changed the engine back after. –  Martin Jul 17 '13 at 23:06
3  
this might fail on MySQL > 5.5, if so use "set session old_alter_table=1;" and "set session old_alter_table=0;" before and after the statement –  chillitom Sep 26 '13 at 10:52

Following remove duplicates for all SID-s, not only single one.

With temp table

CREATE TABLE table_temp AS
SELECT * FROM table GROUP BY title, SID;

DROP TABLE table;
RENAME TABLE table_temp TO table;

Without temp table:

DELETE FROM `table` WHERE id IN (
  SELECT all_duplicates.id FROM (
    SELECT id FROM `table` WHERE (`title`, `SID`) IN (
      SELECT `title`, `SID` FROM `table` GROUP BY `title`, `SID` having count(*) > 1
    )
  ) AS all_duplicates 
  LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT id FROM `table` GROUP BY `title`, `SID` having count(*) > 1
  ) AS grouped_duplicates 
  ON all_duplicates.id = grouped_duplicates.id 
  WHERE grouped_duplicates.id IS NULL
)
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Hmm.. you've grouped things but you haven't removed duplicates... –  Billy ONeal Apr 13 '10 at 14:51
2  
GROUP-ing produces only one result row for each combination of values of fields that you group by. So duplicates will be removed. –  Kamil Szot Apr 13 '10 at 14:54
    
i like the first way, too much elegant here! :B –  iim.hlk Jan 30 '12 at 13:46

Suppose u have a table employee with the following columns:

employee (first_name, last_name, start_date)

In order to delete the duplicate rows say for now first_name:

delete
from employee using employee,
    employee e1
where employee.id > e1.id
    and employee.first_name = e1.first_name  
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DELETE FROM table WHERE Field IN
(SELECT Field FROM table GROUP BY Field HAVING COUNT(Field) > 1)
WHERE SID = "1"

EDIT:

The query above would delete all duplicate records, to keep one of each:

DELETE FROM table WHERE id NOT IN

 (SELECT id FROM
     (SELECT id, field 
     FROM table WHERE SID = "1" 
     GROUP BY field 
     HAVING COUNT(field) > 1) 
 as tmp)    

AND field in

 (SELECT DISTINCT field 
 FROM table 
 WHERE SID = "1" 
 GROUP BY field 
 HAVING COUNT(field) > 1)

I couldn't fully test it but I think this works.

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Won't this delete both copies of duplicated item? –  Kamil Szot Apr 13 '10 at 14:47
    
The Field would be the name of field that defines that a row is duplicated. –  David Espart Apr 13 '10 at 14:48
    
yep, you are right Kamil... –  David Espart Apr 13 '10 at 14:49
    
i have to keep one of data –  Ali Demirci Apr 13 '10 at 14:56

This procedure will remove all duplicates (incl multiples) in a table, keeping the last duplicate. This is an extension of Retrieving last record in each group

Hope this is useful to someone.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS UniqueIDs;
CREATE Temporary table UniqueIDs (id Int(11));

INSERT INTO UniqueIDs
    (SELECT T1.ID FROM Table T1 LEFT JOIN Table T2 ON
    (T1.Field1 = T2.Field1 AND T1.Field2 = T2.Field2 #Comparison Fields 
    AND T1.ID < T2.ID)
    WHERE T2.ID IS NULL);

DELETE FROM Table WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM UniqueIDs);
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Deleting duplicate rows in MySQL, walkthrough

Create the table and insert some rows:

dev-db> create table penguins(foo int, bar varchar(15), baz datetime);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.07 sec)
dev-db> insert into penguins values(1, 'skipper', now());
dev-db> insert into penguins values(1, 'skipper', now());
dev-db> insert into penguins values(3, 'kowalski', now());
dev-db> insert into penguins values(3, 'kowalski', now());
dev-db> insert into penguins values(3, 'kowalski', now());
dev-db> insert into penguins values(4, 'rico', now());
Query OK, 6 rows affected (0.07 sec)
dev-db> select * from penguins;
+------+----------+---------------------+
| foo  | bar      | baz                 |
+------+----------+---------------------+
|    1 | skipper  | 2014-08-25 14:21:54 |
|    1 | skipper  | 2014-08-25 14:21:59 |
|    3 | kowalski | 2014-08-25 14:22:09 |
|    3 | kowalski | 2014-08-25 14:22:13 |
|    3 | kowalski | 2014-08-25 14:22:15 |
|    4 | rico     | 2014-08-25 14:22:22 |
+------+----------+---------------------+
6 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Then remove the duplicates:

dev-db> delete a
    -> from penguins a
    -> left join(
    -> select max(baz) maxtimestamp, foo, bar
    -> from penguins
    -> group by foo, bar) b
    -> on a.baz = maxtimestamp and
    -> a.foo = b.foo and
    -> a.bar = b.bar
    -> where b.maxtimestamp IS NULL;
Query OK, 3 rows affected (0.01 sec)

Result:

dev-db> select * from penguins;
+------+----------+---------------------+
| foo  | bar      | baz                 |
+------+----------+---------------------+
|    1 | skipper  | 2014-08-25 14:21:59 |
|    3 | kowalski | 2014-08-25 14:22:15 |
|    4 | rico     | 2014-08-25 14:22:22 |
+------+----------+---------------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

How you should read that sql delete statement:

Table penguins with alias 'a' is left joined on a subset of table penguins called alias 'b'. The right hand table 'b' which is a subset finds the max timestamp grouped by foo and bar. This is matched to left hand table 'a'. (foo,bar,baz) on left has every row in the table. The right hand subset 'b' has a (maxtimestamp,foo,bar) which is matched to left only on the one that IS the max.

Every row that is not that max has value maxtimestamp of NULL. Filter down on those NULL rows and you have a set of all rows grouped by foo and bar that isn't the latest timestamp baz. Delete those ones.

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