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I want to be able to play sound files in my program. Where should I look?

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1  
Take a look at this class: github.com/dberm22/DBoard/blob/master/src/com/dberm22/utils/… You can call it with (new Thread(new MediaPlayer(PATHTOFILE)).start(); –  dberm22 Jan 20 at 14:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 75 down vote accepted

I personally made this code that works fine. I think it only works with .wav format.

public static synchronized void playSound(final String url) {
  new Thread(new Runnable() {
  // The wrapper thread is unnecessary, unless it blocks on the
  // Clip finishing; see comments.
    public void run() {
      try {
        Clip clip = AudioSystem.getClip();
        AudioInputStream inputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(
          Main.class.getResourceAsStream("/path/to/sounds/" + url));
        clip.open(inputStream);
        clip.start(); 
      } catch (Exception e) {
        System.err.println(e.getMessage());
      }
    }
  }).start();
}
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4  
To avoid Clip being shut down at random time, a LineListener is required. Have a look: stackoverflow.com/questions/577724/trouble-playing-wav-in-java/… –  yanchenko Feb 23 '09 at 15:40
2  
+1 for a solution that uses the public API. Isn't creating a new thread unnecessary(redundant) though? –  Jataro Jul 29 '09 at 9:09
2  
Thanx.. Is it redundant? I made it into a new thread so I can play the sound again before the first clip ends. –  pek Jul 29 '09 at 19:04
3  
I know clip.start() spawns a new thread, so I'm pretty sure it is unnecessary. –  Jataro Jul 29 '09 at 20:20
16  
1) The Thread is unnecessary. 2) For a good example of using Clip, see the JavaSound info. page. 3) If a method requires an URL (or File) give it a dang URL (or File) rather than accept a String that represents one. (Just a personal 'bee in my bonnet'.) 4) e.printStackTrace(); provides more information with less typing than System.err.println(e.getMessage());. –  Andrew Thompson Aug 18 '11 at 19:01

A bad example:

import  sun.audio.*;    //import the sun.audio package
import  java.io.*;

//** add this into your application code as appropriate
// Open an input stream  to the audio file.
InputStream in = new FileInputStream(Filename);

// Create an AudioStream object from the input stream.
AudioStream as = new AudioStream(in);         

// Use the static class member "player" from class AudioPlayer to play
// clip.
AudioPlayer.player.start(as);            

// Similarly, to stop the audio.
AudioPlayer.player.stop(as); 
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9  
java.sun.com/products/jdk/faq/faq-sun-packages.html There are public API alternatives to using sun.audio. –  McDowell Apr 23 '09 at 13:44
2  
@GregHurlman Isn't sun.* package made to be not used by us developers? –  Tom Brito Jun 10 '10 at 14:00
16  
This example comes from a 1997 JavaWorld article. Way out of date, You should NOT use sun.* packages. –  sproketboy Dec 17 '10 at 9:39
1  
do you ever need to close "in"? –  rogerdpack Dec 23 '10 at 0:20
1  
+1 for not using the sun.* packages. They have weird bugs like not handling files > 1MB and not being able to play one clip if the previous hasn't finished yet, etc. –  rogerdpack Sep 26 '11 at 22:55

The Sound Trail of the Java Tutorial is worth being the starting point.

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2  
See also the JavaSound info. page for example code and many handy links related to JavaSound. –  Andrew Thompson Aug 18 '11 at 19:06
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Donal Oct 10 at 8:18

There is an alternative to importing the sound files which works in both applets and applications: convert the audio files into .java files and simply use them in your code.

I have developed a tool which makes this process a lot easier. It simplifies the Java Sound API quite a bit.

http://stephengware.com/projects/soundtoclass/

Hope this helps. -- Stephen

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I used your system to create a class from a wav file, However, When i do my_wave.play(); it doesn't play the audio.. Is there an audio system i need to initialize or something?.. –  thefiscster510 Mar 17 '13 at 18:22
    
this would be really cool if it did actually work. When running play(), the get Audio Line fails (exception "java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: No line matching interface SourceDataLine supporting format PCM_UNSIGNED 44100.0 Hz, 16 bit, stereo, 4 bytes/frame, little-endian is supported." is not thrown). Sad. –  Blauhirn Dec 16 at 2:29

I created a game framework sometime ago to work on Android and Desktop, the desktop part that handle sound maybe can be used as inspiration to what you need.

https://github.com/hamilton-lima/jaga/blob/master/jaga%20desktop/src-desktop/com/athanazio/jaga/desktop/sound/Sound.java

Here is the code for reference.

package com.athanazio.jaga.desktop.sound;

import java.io.BufferedInputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;

import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.UnsupportedAudioFileException;

public class Sound {

    AudioInputStream in;

    AudioFormat decodedFormat;

    AudioInputStream din;

    AudioFormat baseFormat;

    SourceDataLine line;

    private boolean loop;

    private BufferedInputStream stream;

    // private ByteArrayInputStream stream;

    /**
     * recreate the stream
     * 
     */
    public void reset() {
        try {
            stream.reset();
            in = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(stream);
            din = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(decodedFormat, in);
            line = getLine(decodedFormat);

        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void close() {
        try {
            line.close();
            din.close();
            in.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }

    Sound(String filename, boolean loop) {
        this(filename);
        this.loop = loop;
    }

    Sound(String filename) {
        this.loop = false;
        try {
            InputStream raw = Object.class.getResourceAsStream(filename);
            stream = new BufferedInputStream(raw);

            // ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
            // byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            // int read = raw.read(buffer);
            // while( read > 0 ) {
            // out.write(buffer, 0, read);
            // read = raw.read(buffer);
            // }
            // stream = new ByteArrayInputStream(out.toByteArray());

            in = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(stream);
            din = null;

            if (in != null) {
                baseFormat = in.getFormat();

                decodedFormat = new AudioFormat(
                        AudioFormat.Encoding.PCM_SIGNED, baseFormat
                                .getSampleRate(), 16, baseFormat.getChannels(),
                        baseFormat.getChannels() * 2, baseFormat
                                .getSampleRate(), false);

                din = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(decodedFormat, in);
                line = getLine(decodedFormat);
            }
        } catch (UnsupportedAudioFileException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (LineUnavailableException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private SourceDataLine getLine(AudioFormat audioFormat)
            throws LineUnavailableException {
        SourceDataLine res = null;
        DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class,
                audioFormat);
        res = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
        res.open(audioFormat);
        return res;
    }

    public void play() {

        try {
            boolean firstTime = true;
            while (firstTime || loop) {

                firstTime = false;
                byte[] data = new byte[4096];

                if (line != null) {

                    line.start();
                    int nBytesRead = 0;

                    while (nBytesRead != -1) {
                        nBytesRead = din.read(data, 0, data.length);
                        if (nBytesRead != -1)
                            line.write(data, 0, nBytesRead);
                    }

                    line.drain();
                    line.stop();
                    line.close();

                    reset();
                }
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
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For playing sound in java, you can refer to the following code.

import java.io.*;
import java.net.URL;
import javax.sound.sampled.*;
import javax.swing.*;

// To play sound using Clip, the process need to be alive.
// Hence, we use a Swing application.
public class SoundClipTest extends JFrame {

   // Constructor
   public SoundClipTest() {
      this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      this.setTitle("Test Sound Clip");
      this.setSize(300, 200);
      this.setVisible(true);

      try {
         // Open an audio input stream.
         URL url = this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResource("gameover.wav");
         AudioInputStream audioIn = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(url);
         // Get a sound clip resource.
         Clip clip = AudioSystem.getClip();
         // Open audio clip and load samples from the audio input stream.
         clip.open(audioIn);
         clip.start();
      } catch (UnsupportedAudioFileException e) {
         e.printStackTrace();
      } catch (IOException e) {
         e.printStackTrace();
      } catch (LineUnavailableException e) {
         e.printStackTrace();
      }
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      new SoundClipTest();
   }
}
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protected by Jeff Atwood Oct 24 '10 at 19:43

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