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If I have a reference to an object -

var test = {};

that will potentially (but not immediately) have nested objects, something like -

{ level1:{level2:{level3:'level3'}} };

what is the best way to test for the existence of keys in the most deeply nested objects?

This -

alert(test.level1);

returns 'undefined', but this -

alert(test.level1.level2.level3);

fails.

I'm currently doing something like this -

if(test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3) {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
}

but I was wondering if there's a better way.

share|improve this question
1  
you might want to check a tangentially related question that was asked recently stackoverflow.com/questions/2525943/… –  Anurag Apr 13 '10 at 16:21
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/10918488/… –  James McMahon Dec 21 '12 at 15:38
    
A couple of propositions there : stackoverflow.com/a/18381564/1636522 –  wawawared Sep 7 '13 at 7:27
    
Your current approach has a potential issue if level3 property is a false, in that case, even if the property exist will retur nfalse have a look at this example please jsfiddle.net/maz9bLjx –  GibboK Jul 11 at 6:18

27 Answers 27

up vote 87 down vote accepted
+500

You have to do it step by step if you don't want a TypeError, because if one of the members is null or undefined, and you try to access a member an exception will be thrown.

You can either simply catch the exception, or make a function to test the existence of multiple levels, something like this:

function checkNested(obj /*, level1, level2, ... levelN*/) {
  var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);

  for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
    if (!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(args[i])) {
      return false;
    }
    obj = obj[args[i]];
  }
  return true;
}

var test = {level1:{level2:{level3:'level3'}} };

checkNested(test, 'level1', 'level2', 'level3'); // true
checkNested(test, 'level1', 'level2', 'foo'); // false
share|improve this answer
    
amazing logic Oo, what is Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments) doing? –  Rodrigo Dias Nov 9 '12 at 18:17
3  
arguments is not actually an array. Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments) converts it to a formal array. Learn –  deefour Nov 10 '12 at 1:00
    
Hi CMS very nice logic, so i posted a modified solution to handle null checks as well –  Anand Sunderraman Jun 21 '13 at 18:05
5  
this'd be a lot more efficient to do var obj = arguments[0]; and start from var i = 1 instead of copying the arguments object –  Claudiu Oct 31 '13 at 19:45
    
Thanks for the function! I modified it to accept arguments in the format of ... (obj, 'level1.level2.level3') ... to keep usage easier and more readable –  derrylwc Sep 3 '14 at 21:05

Here is a pattern I picked up from Oliver Steele:

var level3 = (((test || {}).level1 || {}).level2 || {}).level3;
alert( level3 );

In fact that whole article is a discussion of how you can do this in javascript. He settles on using the above syntax (which isn't that hard to read once you get used to it) as an idiom.

share|improve this answer
    
So, if you fail at the first level, you keep searching through the entire pipe to finally get undefined, which was predictable. Not so interesting ;) –  wawawared Sep 5 '13 at 11:45
2  
@wared I think it is interesting mostly for how concise it is. There is a detailed discussion of the performance characteristics in the linked post. Yes it always does all the tests, but it avoids creating temp vars, and you can alias {} to a var if you want to prevent the overhead of creating a new empty object each time. In 99% of cases I would not expect speed to matter, and in cases where it does there is no substitute for profiling. –  Gabe Moothart Sep 5 '13 at 18:13
    
I understand now, I was apparently off topic :) That said, I like the idea of a reusable empty object. –  wawawared Sep 5 '13 at 19:59
1  
if test is undefined it will gives error. –  Muhammad Umer Feb 24 at 17:30
3  
@MuhammadUmer No, the point of (test || {}) is that if test is undefined, then you're doing ({}.level1 || {}). Of course, {}.level1 is undefined, so that means you're doing {}.level2, and so on. –  Joshua Taylor Apr 28 at 16:06

Update

Looks like lodash has added _.get for all your nested property getting needs.

https://lodash.com/docs#get


lodash users may enjoy lodash.contrib which has a couple methods that mitigate this problem.

getPath

Signature: _.getPath(obj:Object, ks:String|Array)

Gets the value at any depth in a nested object based on the path described by the keys given. Keys may be given as an array or as a dot-separated string. Returns undefined if the path cannot be reached.

var countries = {
        greece: {
            athens: {
                playwright:  "Sophocles"
            }
        }
    }
};

_.getPath(countries, "greece.athens.playwright");
// => "Sophocles"

_.getPath(countries, "greece.sparta.playwright");
// => undefined

_.getPath(countries, ["greece", "athens", "playwright"]);
// => "Sophocles"

_.getPath(countries, ["greece", "sparta", "playwright"]);
// => undefined
share|improve this answer
    
Lodash really needs a _.isPathDefined(obj, pathString) method. –  Matthew Payne Jan 9 at 16:34
    
@MatthewPayne It'd be nice perhaps, but it really isn't necessary. You could do it yourself really easily function isPathDefined(object, path) { return typeof _.getPath(object, path) !== 'undefined'; } –  Thor84no May 12 at 11:33
2  
Lodash has this same functionality itself: _.get(countries, 'greece.sparta.playwright', 'default'); // → 'default' _.has(countries, 'greece.spart.playwright') // → false –  Tom May 15 at 18:23
    
@Tom thanks. Really glad they include that by default now. –  Austin Pray May 15 at 22:56

You can read an object property at any depth, if you handle the name like a string: 't.level1.level2.level3'.

window.t={level1:{level2:{level3: 'level3'}}};

function deeptest(s){
    s= s.split('.')
    var obj= window[s.shift()];
    while(obj && s.length) obj= obj[s.shift()];
    return obj;
}

alert(deeptest('t.level1.level2.level3') || 'Undefined');

It returns undefined if any of the segments is undefined.

share|improve this answer
1  
Worth noting that this method is very performant, at least in Chrome, in some cases outperforming @Claudiu modified version of selected answer. See performance test here: jsperf.com/check-if-deep-property-exists-with-willnotthrow –  netpoetica Nov 27 '14 at 5:32

how about

try {
   alert(test.level1.level2.level3)
} catch(e) {
 ...whatever

}
share|improve this answer
11  
I don't think try/catch is a good way to test for existence of an object: try/catch is meant to handle exceptions, not normal conditions such as the test here. I think (typeof foo == "undefined") at each step is better -- and in general, there's probably some refactoring required if you're working with such deeply nested properties. Also, try/catch will cause a break in Firebug (and in any browser where break-on-error is turned on) if an exception is thrown. –  Sam Dutton Nov 9 '10 at 12:00
    
I vote on this, because browser will check the existence twice if you use other solutions. Lets say you want to call ´a.c.b = 2´. Browser has to check the existence before modifying the value (otherwise it would be a memory error caught by OS). –  user669677 Sep 2 '13 at 12:04
3  
The question still remain: witch one is faster for browsers to set up a try catch or call hasOwnProperty() n times? –  user669677 Sep 2 '13 at 12:12
3  
Why is this bad again? This looks cleanest to me. –  Austin Pray Jun 4 '14 at 19:26

I tried a recursive approach:

function objHasKeys(obj, keys) {
  var next = keys.shift();
  return obj[next] && (! keys.length || objHasKeys(obj[next], keys));
}

The ! keys.length || kicks out of the recursion so it doesn't run the function with no keys left to test. Tests:

obj = {
  path: {
    to: {
      the: {
        goodKey: "hello"
      }
    }
  }
}

console.log(objHasKeys(obj, ['path', 'to', 'the', 'goodKey'])); // true
console.log(objHasKeys(obj, ['path', 'to', 'the', 'badKey']));  // undefined

I am using it to print a friendly html view of a bunch of objects with unknown key/values, e.g.:

var biosName = objHasKeys(myObj, 'MachineInfo:BiosInfo:Name'.split(':'))
             ? myObj.MachineInfo.BiosInfo.Name
             : 'unknown';
share|improve this answer
var a;

a = {
    b: {
        c: 'd'
    }
};

function isset (fn) {
    var value;
    try {
        value = fn();
    } catch (e) {
        value = undefined;
    } finally {
        return value !== undefined;
    }
};

// ES5
console.log(
    isset(function () { return a.b.c; }),
    isset(function () { return a.b.c.d.e.f; })
);

If you are coding in ES6 environment (or using 6to5) then you can take advantage of the arrow function syntax:

// ES6 using the arrow function
console.log(
    isset(() => a.b.c),
    isset(() => a.b.c.d.e.f)
);

Regarding the performance, there is no performance penalty for using try..catch block if the property is set. There is a performance impact if the property is unset.

share|improve this answer

One simple way is this:

try {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
} catch(e) {
    alert("undefined");    // this is optional to put any output here
}

The try/catch catches the cases for when any of the higher level objects such as test, test.level1, test.level1.level2 are not defined.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer jfriend00. –  user113716 Oct 12 '11 at 16:28

A shorter, ES5 version of @CMS's excellent answer:

// Check the obj has the keys in the order mentioned. Used for checking JSON results.  
var checkObjHasKeys = function(obj, keys) {
  var success = true;
  keys.forEach( function(key) {
    if ( ! obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      success = false;
    }
    obj = obj[key];
  })
  return success;
}

With a similar test:

var test = { level1:{level2:{level3:'result'}}};
utils.checkObjHasKeys(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'level3']); // true
utils.checkObjHasKeys(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'foo']); // false
share|improve this answer
    
the only issue with this is if there are multiple levels of undefined keys, then you get a TypeError, e.g. checkObjHasKeys(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'asdf', 'asdf']); –  JKS Jul 19 '12 at 17:34

The answer given by CMS works fine with the following modification for null checks as well

function checkNested(obj /*, level1, level2, ... levelN*/) 
      {
             var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments),
             obj = args.shift();

            for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) 
            {
                if (obj == null || !obj.hasOwnProperty(args[i]) ) 
                {
                    return false;
                }
                obj = obj[args[i]];
            }
            return true;
    }
share|improve this answer

I automated the process

if(isset(object,["prop1","prop2"])){
// YES!

}

function isset(object, props){
    var dump;
    try {
        for(var x in props){
            if(x == 0) {
                dump = object[props[x]];
                return;
            }
            dump = dump[props[x]];
        }
    } catch(e) {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A couple things to note. You're doing a for/in over an array, which is not recommended. That is really meant for objects. There's no guarantee that the order of execution will be consistent. Also, if you're going to loop over the properties, I probably wouldn't use try/catch. I think you'll get better performance taking a if( props[x] in object ) approach, or if( object.hasOwnProperty(props[x]) ) if you don't want to include prototype properties. My situation was such that I was only interested in the deepest property. That's why I chose try/catch. –  user113716 Oct 27 '10 at 14:55
    
If you look closely, I move in the object level using the dump variable, I am not staying at level 1 –  Cedric Dugas Oct 28 '10 at 13:01
    
but your right about for/in, my heart is broken :/, it is also slower –  Cedric Dugas Oct 28 '10 at 13:11

Another ES5 solution:

function hasProperties(object, properties) {
    return !properties.some(function(property){
        if (!object.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
            return true;
        }
        object = object[property];
        return false;
    });
}
share|improve this answer

Just wrote this function today which does a deep search for a property in a nested object and returns the value at the property if found.

/**
 * Performs a deep search looking for the existence of a property in a 
 * nested object. Supports namespaced search: Passing a string with
 * a parent sub-object where the property key may exist speeds up
 * search, for instance: Say you have a nested object and you know for 
 * certain the property/literal you're looking for is within a certain
 * sub-object, you can speed the search up by passing "level2Obj.targetProp"
 * @param {object} obj Object to search
 * @param {object} key Key to search for
 * @return {*} Returns the value (if any) located at the key
 */
var getPropByKey = function( obj, key ) {
    var ret = false, ns = key.split("."),
        args = arguments,
        alen = args.length;

    // Search starting with provided namespace
    if ( ns.length > 1 ) {
        obj = (libName).getPropByKey( obj, ns[0] );
        key = ns[1];
    }

    // Look for a property in the object
    if ( key in obj ) {
        return obj[key];
    } else {
        for ( var o in obj ) {
            if ( (libName).isPlainObject( obj[o] ) ) {
                ret = (libName).getPropByKey( obj[o], key );
                if ( ret === 0 || ret === undefined || ret ) {
                    return ret;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
i think question is about verifying the existence of property not search it out in any one of the children of the object which is different. a.b.c and a.e.c will both return value if urfunc(a,'c') is called. function like if(exists(a.b.c)) is ideal –  Muhammad Umer Feb 24 at 17:23
    
What is "libName"? –  Noah Stahl Jul 25 at 2:37

My solution that I use since long time (using string unfortunaly, couldn't find better)

function get_if_exist(str){
    try{return eval(str)}
    catch(e){return undefined}
}

// way to use
if(get_if_exist('test.level1.level2.level3')) {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
}

// or simply 
alert(get_if_exist('test.level1.level2.level3'));

edit: this work only if object "test" have global scope/range. else you have to do something like :

// i think it's the most beautiful code I have ever write :p
function get_if_exist(obj){
    return arguments.length==1 || (obj[arguments[1]] && get_if_exist.apply(this,[obj[arguments[1]]].concat([].slice.call(arguments,2))));
}

alert(get_if_exist(test,'level1','level2','level3'));

edit final version to allow 2 method of call :

function get_if_exist(obj){
    var a=arguments, b=a.callee; // replace a.callee by the function name you choose because callee is depreceate, in this case : get_if_exist
    // version 1 calling the version 2
    if(a[1] && ~a[1].indexOf('.')) 
        return b.apply(this,[obj].concat(a[1].split('.')));
    // version 2
    return a.length==1 ? a[0] : (obj[a[1]] && b.apply(this,[obj[a[1]]].concat([].slice.call(a,2))));
}

// method 1
get_if_exist(test,'level1.level2.level3');


// method 2
get_if_exist(test,'level1','level2','level3');
share|improve this answer

theres a function here on thecodeabode (safeRead) which will do this in a safe manner... i.e.

safeRead(test, 'level1', 'level2', 'level3');

if any property is null or undefined, an empty string is returned

share|improve this answer

Based on a previous comment, here is another version where the main object could not be defined either:

// Supposing that our property is at first.second.third.property:
var property = (((typeof first !== 'undefined' ? first : {}).second || {}).third || {}).property;
share|improve this answer

Another option (close to this answer) :

function resolve(root, path){
    try {
        return (new Function(
            'root', 'return root.' + path + ';'
        ))(root);
    } catch (e) {}
}

var tree = { level1: [{ key: 'value' }] };
resolve(tree, 'level1[0].key'); // "value"
resolve(tree, 'level1[1].key'); // undefined

More on this : http://stackoverflow.com/a/18381564/1636522

share|improve this answer

Following options were elaborated starting from this answer. Same tree for both :

var o = { a: { b: { c: 1 } } };

Stop searching when undefined

var u = undefined;
o.a ? o.a.b ? o.a.b.c : u : u // 1
o.x ? o.x.y ? o.x.y.z : u : u // undefined
(o = o.a) ? (o = o.b) ? o.c : u : u // 1

Ensure each level one by one

var $ = function (empty) {
    return function (node) {
        return node || empty;
    };
}({});

$($(o.a).b).c // 1
$($(o.x).y).z // undefined
share|improve this answer

Yet another version:

function nestedPropertyExists(obj, props) {
    var prop = props.shift();
    return prop === undefined
        ? true
        : obj.hasOwnProperty(prop) ? nestedPropertyExists(obj[prop], props) : false;
}

nestedPropertyExists({a:{b:{c:1}}}, ['a','b','c']); // returns true
nestedPropertyExists({a:{b:{c:1}}}, ['a','b','c','d']); // returns false
share|improve this answer

I wrote a library called l33teral to help test for nested properties. You can use it like this:

var myObj = {/*...*/};
var hasNestedProperties = leet(myObj).probe('prop1.prop2.prop3');

I do like the ES5/6 solutions here, too.

share|improve this answer
function isIn(string, object){
    var arr = string.split(".");
    var notFound = true;
    var length = arr.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++){
        var key = arr[i];
        if (!object.hasOwnProperty(key)){
            notFound = false;
            break;
        }
        if ((i + length) <= length){
            object = object[key];
        }
    }
    return notFound;
}
var musicCollection = {
    hasslehoff: {
        greatestHits : true
    }
};
console.log(isIn("hasslehoff.greatestHits", musicCollection));
console.log(isIn("hasslehoff.worseHits", musicCollection));

here my String based delimiter version.

share|improve this answer

I wrote my own function that takes the desired path, and has a good and bad callback function.

function checkForPathInObject(object, path, callbackGood, callbackBad){
    var pathParts = path.split(".");
    var currentObjectPath = object;

    // Test every step to see if it exists in object
    for(var i=0; i<(pathParts.length); i++){
        var currentPathPart = pathParts[i];
        if(!currentObjectPath.hasOwnProperty(pathParts[i])){
            if(callbackBad){
                callbackBad();
            }
            return false;
        } else {
            currentObjectPath = currentObjectPath[pathParts[i]];
        }
    }

    // call full path in callback
    callbackGood();
}

Usage:

var testObject = {
    level1:{
        level2:{
            level3:{
            }
        }
    }
};


checkForPathInObject(testObject, "level1.level2.level3", function(){alert("good!")}, function(){alert("bad!")}); // good

checkForPathInObject(testObject, "level1.level2.level3.levelNotThere", function(){alert("good!")}, function(){alert("bad!")}); //bad
share|improve this answer

I know this question is old, but I wanted to offer an extension by adding this to all objects. I know people tend to frown on using the Object prototype for extended object functionality, but I don't find anything easier than doing this. Plus, it's now allowed for with the Object.defineProperty method.

Object.defineProperty( Object.prototype, "has", { value: function( needle ) {
    var obj = this;
    var needles = needle.split( "." );
    for( var i = 0; i<needles.length; i++ ) {
        if( !obj.hasOwnProperty(needles[i])) {
            return false;
        }
        obj = obj[needles[i]];
    }
    return true;
}});

Now, in order to test for any property in any object you can simply do:

if( obj.has("some.deep.nested.object.somewhere") )

Here's a jsfiddle to test it out, and in particular it includes some jQuery that breaks if you modify the Object.prototype directly because of the property becoming enumerable. This should work fine with 3rd party libraries.

share|improve this answer
//Just in case is not supported or not included by your framework
//***************************************************
Array.prototype.some = function(fn, thisObj) {
  var scope = thisObj || window;
  for ( var i=0, j=this.length; i < j; ++i ) {
    if ( fn.call(scope, this[i], i, this) ) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
};
//****************************************************

function isSet (object, string) {
  if (!object) return false;
  var childs = string.split('.');
  if (childs.length > 0 ) {
    return !childs.some(function (item) {
      if (item in object) {
        object = object[item]; 
        return false;
      } else return true;
    });
  } else if (string in object) { 
    return true;
  } else return false;
}

var object = {
  data: {
    item: {
      sub_item: {
        bla: {
          here : {
            iam: true
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
};

console.log(isSet(object,'data.item')); // true
console.log(isSet(object,'x')); // false
console.log(isSet(object,'data.sub_item')); // false
console.log(isSet(object,'data.item')); // true
console.log(isSet(object,'data.item.sub_item.bla.here.iam')); // true
share|improve this answer

I think this is a slight improvement (becomes a 1-liner):

   alert( test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3 )

This works because the && operator returns the final operand it evaluated (and it short-circuits).

share|improve this answer

I was looking for the value to be returned if the property exists, so I modified the answer by CMS above. Here's what I came up with:

function getNestedProperty(obj, key) {
  // Get property array from key string
  var properties = key.split(".");

  // Iterate through properties, returning undefined if object is null or property doesn't exist
  for (var i = 0; i < properties.length; i++) {
    if (!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(properties[i])) {
      return;
    }
    obj = obj[properties[i]];
  }

  // Nested property found, so return the value
  return obj;
}


Usage:

getNestedProperty(test, "level1.level2.level3") // "level3"
getNestedProperty(test, "level1.level2.foo") // undefined

share|improve this answer

This is my solution. It will work for the most of the cases because it check if the property has nested properties in it.

var arr = ["prop1", "prop2", "prop3", "prop3.prop4", "prop5"];

  function checkIfObjectHasGivenProperies(obj, arr) {
                var i = 0, length = arr.length, arrElem = null;
                for (; i < length; i++) {
                    arrElem = arr[i].split(".");
                    if (Array.isArray(arrElem) && arrElem.length > 1) {
                        if (!checkIfObjectHasGivenProperies(obj[arrElem[0]], [arrElem.slice(1, arrElem.length).join(".")])) {
                            return false;
                        }
                    } else {
                        if (!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(arrElem[0])) {
                            return false;
                        }
                    }
                }
                return true;
            };
share|improve this answer

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