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I'm running into a common pattern in the code that I'm writing, where I need to wait for all threads in a group to complete, with a timeout. The timeout is supposed to be the time required for all threads to complete, so simply doing thread.Join(timeout) for each thread won't work, since the possible timeout is then timeout * numThreads.

Right now I do something like the following:

var threadFinishEvents = new List<EventWaitHandle>();

foreach (DataObject data in dataList)
{
    // Create local variables for the thread delegate
    var threadFinish = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset);
    threadFinishEvents.Add(threadFinish);

    var localData = (DataObject) data.Clone();
    var thread = new Thread(
        delegate()
        {
            DoThreadStuff(localData);
            threadFinish.Set();
        }
    );
    thread.Start();
}

Mutex.WaitAll(threadFinishEvents.ToArray(), timeout);

However, it seems like there should be a simpler idiom for this sort of thing.

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any final solution with full source code working ? maybe more complex sample for notify errors in each thread and after WaitAll shows a summary ? –  Kiquenet Jan 1 at 10:11

12 Answers 12

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I still think using Join is simpler. Record the expected completion time (as Now+timeout), then, in a loop, do

if(!thread.Join(End-now))
    throw new NotFinishedInTime();
share|improve this answer

With .NET 4.0 I find System.Threading.Tasks a lot easier to work with. Here's spin-wait loop which works reliably for me. It blocks the main thread until all the tasks complete. There's also Task.WaitAll, but that hasn't always worked for me.

        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            tasks[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {               
                 DoThreadStuff(localData);
            });
        }
        while (tasks.Any(t => !t.IsCompleted)) { } //spin wait
share|improve this answer
15  
You want Task.WaitAll(tasks) instead of that spin. –  ladenedge Dec 26 '11 at 17:27
    
Not necessarily, reread answer. –  cyberSecurity Dec 27 '11 at 3:59
7  
@T.Webster - what do you mean by saying that Task.WaitAll didn't always work for you? Are you suggesting that this methods has bugs? Can you provide examples. It always works for me. On the other side, the spin that you suggest is quite expensive thing to do. You are hammering your CPU. Task.WaitAll is much better solution. –  Alex Aza Dec 3 '12 at 8:43
2  
If you use this option I would suggest at least putting Thread.Yield() in the while body. –  Wouter Simons Feb 6 '13 at 12:55
    
any more complex sample for notify errors in each thread and after WaitAll shows a summary ? –  Kiquenet Jan 1 at 10:12

Off the top of my head, why don't you just Thread.Join(timeout) and remove the time it took to join from the total timeout?

// pseudo-c#:

TimeSpan timeout = timeoutPerThread * threads.Count();

foreach (Thread thread in threads)
{
    DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

    if (!thread.Join(timeout))
        throw new TimeoutException();

    timeout -= (DateTime.Now - start);
}

Edit: code is now less pseudo. don't understand why you would mod an answer -2 when the answer you modded +4 is exactly the same, only less detailed.

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That's incorrect: the complete timeout for all threads is given, any any thread (including the first one being waited for) may consume the complete timeout. Your code doesn't check the result of the Join. –  Martin v. Löwis Nov 4 '08 at 19:49
3  
First of all, this is pseudo-code and is, as it is not real code, incomplete. I assumed a time equal to or less than zero will throw or something. Secondly, if the first thread consumes the entire time, the operation should time out as a whole. This is correct according to the question. –  Omer van Kloeten Nov 4 '08 at 20:44

Since the question got bumped I will go ahead and post my solution.

using (var finished = new CountdownEvent(1)) 
{ 
  for (DataObject data in dataList) 
  {   
    finished.AddCount();
    var localData = (DataObject)data.Clone(); 
    var thread = new Thread( 
        delegate() 
        {
          try
          {
            DoThreadStuff(localData); 
            threadFinish.Set();
          }
          finally
          {
            finished.Signal();
          }
        } 
    ); 
    thread.Start(); 
  }  
  finished.Signal(); 
  finished.Wait(YOUR_TIMEOUT); 
} 
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This may not be an option for you, but if you can use the Parallel Extension for .NET then you could use Tasks instead of raw threads and then use Task.WaitAll() to wait for them to complete.

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That's what I would do - can't think of a simpler way to do that.

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I've never programmed in C# but due to a large number of similarities with Java I suppose they would have a Barrier class or something similar. A quick search led me to this URL:
C# Barrier Class
( press the C# tabs because by default the link shows VB -.- )
From a quick look it seems very flexible. You can even dynamically add/remove participants in your Barrier instance ;).

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I was tying to figure out how to do this but i could not get any answers from google. I know this is an old thread but here was my solution:

Use the following class:

class ThreadWaiter
    {
        private int _numThreads = 0;
        private int _spinTime;

        public ThreadWaiter(int SpinTime)
        {
            this._spinTime = SpinTime;
        }

        public void AddThreads(int numThreads)
        {
            _numThreads += numThreads;
        }

        public void RemoveThread()
        {
            if (_numThreads > 0)
            {
                _numThreads--;
            }
        }

        public void Wait()
        {
            while (_numThreads != 0)
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(_spinTime);
            }
        }
    }
  1. Call Addthreads(int numThreads) before executing a thread(s).
  2. Call RemoveThread() after each one has completed.
  3. Use Wait() at the point that you want to wait for all the threads to complete before continuing
share|improve this answer
    
post it as a separate question –  xbonez Oct 1 '10 at 14:56

I read the book C# 4.0: The Complete Reference of Herbert Schildt. The author use join to give a solution :

class MyThread
    {
        public int Count;
        public Thread Thrd;
        public MyThread(string name)
        {
            Count = 0;
            Thrd = new Thread(this.Run);
            Thrd.Name = name;
            Thrd.Start();
        }
        // Entry point of thread.
        void Run()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Thrd.Name + " starting.");
            do
            {
                Thread.Sleep(500);
                Console.WriteLine("In " + Thrd.Name +
                ", Count is " + Count);
                Count++;
            } while (Count < 10);
            Console.WriteLine(Thrd.Name + " terminating.");
        }
    }
    // Use Join() to wait for threads to end.
    class JoinThreads
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Main thread starting.");
            // Construct three threads.
            MyThread mt1 = new MyThread("Child #1");
            MyThread mt2 = new MyThread("Child #2");
            MyThread mt3 = new MyThread("Child #3");
            mt1.Thrd.Join();
            Console.WriteLine("Child #1 joined.");
            mt2.Thrd.Join();
            Console.WriteLine("Child #2 joined.");
            mt3.Thrd.Join();
            Console.WriteLine("Child #3 joined.");
            Console.WriteLine("Main thread ending.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
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This doesn't answer the question (no timeout), but I've made a very simple extension method to wait all threads of a collection:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;
namespace Extensions
{
    public static class ThreadExtension
    {
        public static void WaitAll(this IEnumerable<Thread> threads)
        {
            if(threads!=null)
            {
                foreach(Thread thread in threads)
                { thread.Join(); }
            }
        }
    }
}

Then you simply call:

List<Thread> threads=new List<Thread>();
//Add your threads to this collection
threads.WaitAll();
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Possible solution:

var tasks = dataList
    .Select(data => Task.Factory.StartNew(arg => DoThreadStuff(data), TaskContinuationOptions.LongRunning | TaskContinuationOptions.PreferFairness))
    .ToArray();

var timeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1);
Task.WaitAll(tasks, timeout);

Assuming dataList is the list of items and each item needs to be processed in a separate thread.

share|improve this answer
    
any more complex sample for notify errors in each thread and after WaitAll shows a summary ? –  Kiquenet Jan 1 at 10:11

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