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My Code:

public class Contact
{
    public string id{ get; set; }
    public string contact_type_id { get; set; }
    public string value{ get; set; }
    public string person_id { get; set; }
    public Contact()
    {

    }
}

public class Contact:Base.Contact
{
    public ContactType ContactType { get; set; }
    public Person Person {get; set;}
    public Contact()
    {
        ContactType = new ContactType();
        Person = new Person();
    }
}

And:

Contact c = new Contact();
Base.Contact cb = (Base.Contact)c;

The Problem:

The **cb** is set to **Contac** and not to **Base.Contact**.
Have any trick to do that????
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I read the answers and still do not understand the problem! What is the problem with the above code?


Besides, from the comments, I understand that you need to serialize the base class only. I think there is no problem, to begin with. Look at the example-

class A
{
    public int a = -1;
};

class B : A
{
    public int b = 0;
};

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A aobj = new B();
        aobj.a = 100; // <--- your aobj obviously cannot access B's members.
        Console.In.ReadLine();
    }
}

Now, if you must make your serialize function virtual, then yes, there is problem. Then this might help -

abstract class Ia
{
    public abstract void Serialize();
}
class A : Ia
{
    public int a = -1;
    sealed public override void Serialize() {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("In A serialize");
    }
};

class B : A
{
    public int b = 0;
    /*
     * Error here -
    public override void Serialize()
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("In B serialize");
    }
     */

    //this is ok. This can only be invoked by B's objects.
    public new void Serialize()
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("In B serialize");
    }
};

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A aobj = new B();
        aobj.Serialize();
        Console.In.ReadLine();
    }
}

//Output: In A serialize
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Nothing to do with Silverlight.

That is what casting does -- you're still returning a reference to c, which is a Base.Contact.

You can't call ContactType or Person on cb (unless you upcast, which you shouldn't).

What is the problem with that?

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I need to serealize only my base class, this is my poblem !! –  CrazyJoe Apr 13 '10 at 19:22
    
The DataContractJsonSerializer do a deep serealizer but i need only properities on Base.Contact. –  CrazyJoe Apr 13 '10 at 19:24
    
I need a DownCast, but when i Cast object Down its Cast Up my cb !! –  CrazyJoe Apr 13 '10 at 19:28
    
Probably the easiest way is to add a copy constructor to Base.Contact and then you can var cb = new Base.Contact( c ); and cb will be of type Base.Contact. This feels like a bit of a hack though. –  Neal Apr 13 '10 at 19:41
    
@Crazy Yeah, if you really want just the base, you'll have to new it up as Neal described, copying values over from the derived class. –  Jay Apr 13 '10 at 19:54
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You definitely can't turn a class into one of its base classes by casting. Depending on the type of serialization you're using, you may be able to tell the serializer to assume the class is of the base type, which would limit the serialization to the base type's members.

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Add a copy constructor into a base class (e.g. public Contact(Contact other)) and then you can do this:

Contact c = new Contact();
Base.Contact cb = new Base.Contact(c);
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