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I read in an ebook somewhere (which I'm desperate to find again), that, by using delegates, it is possible to write code which has syntax as follows:

 ()(); // where delegate precedes this.

Can anyone provide any details how this would be possible/in what situation this would occur?

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10  
What possible purpose could there be for this (other than having two empty eyes stare at you in code)? –  Michael Todd Apr 13 '10 at 20:27
2  
I'm curious, what would that be used for? It's not exactly the most unambiguous code imaginable... :) –  stakx Apr 13 '10 at 20:27
    
@Michael, damn, you beat me by 2 seconds! –  stakx Apr 13 '10 at 20:27
1  
This question really brings out the obscure side of the Force - I am impressed at seeing such bright minds competing enthusiastically to produce genuinely, deeply horrifying code! –  Mathias Apr 13 '10 at 20:54
2  
@Mathias: Evil code is the funnest. And the "best" part is, the more evil your code becomes, the more evil you want it to be. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 13 '10 at 21:02
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7 Answers

up vote 125 down vote accepted

You can do slightly better than the examples given so far, in fact... you can extend it arbitrarily:

class Test
{
    delegate Hofstadter Hofstadter();

    static void Main()
    {
        // Unfortunately I'm clearly not as smart as the real thing
        Hofstadter douglas = () => null;

        douglas()()()()()()();
    }
}

And here's another horrible alternative, for extra ASCII art:

class Test
{
    delegate __ ___();
    delegate ___ __(___ _);

    static void Main()
    {
        ___ _ = () => null;

        _ ()((_))();
    }
}

Please never ever, ever do this.

EDIT: One last one - although it's as much about just replacing things with underscores as anything else, and reusing names wherever possible:

class Test
{
    delegate void _();
    delegate __<_> ___<_>();
    delegate ___<_> __<_>(___<_> ____);

    static ___<_> ____<_>(___<_> ____) { return ____; }
    static __<_> ____<_>() { return ____<_>; }

    static void Main()
    {
        ((__<_>)____)(____<_>)();
    }
}
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177  
I'm pretty sure this summons a velociraptor. –  womp Apr 13 '10 at 20:43
18  
It's actually a secret incantation that grants superhero C# abilities to the person that says it. Unfortunately, it works only once and Jon's already use it. –  Franci Penov Apr 13 '10 at 20:50
8  
1 tweet and it gets 30 upvotes within 5 minutes. Nice. –  Amy B Apr 13 '10 at 20:51
7  
@Coronatus: Yes, I think it's time to make it CW just so it doesn't look like a rep grab attempt. –  Jon Skeet Apr 13 '10 at 20:54
12  
Nothing beats Haskell's owl: ((.)$(.)) (which compiles and has a type (a -> b -> c) -> a -> (a1 -> b) -> a1 -> c). haskell.org/haskellwiki/Pointfree –  Tomas Petricek Apr 13 '10 at 22:46
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Here's a sample program that demonstrates this:

using System;

class Program
{
    static Action GetMethod()
    {
        return () => Console.WriteLine("Executing");
    }
    static void Main()
    {
        GetMethod()();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

That being said, I wouldn't ever do this in production code. It's very unexpected.


Edit: Just in case you want to see something even uglier... [especially the "()()[()=>{}]()"]:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        (new Program()).Confusion();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public Action this[Action index]
    {
        get {
            return () => Console.WriteLine("Executing");
        }
    }

    Func<Program> GetInstance()
    {
        return () => this;
    }

    void Confusion()
    {
        // This is particularly ugly...
        GetInstance()()[()=>{}]();
    }
}
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6  
Dude. That is just...I don't know. I am going to be looking for places to do this in a production app now, though it be an act of great evil. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 13 '10 at 20:47
3  
+1 for going the extra mile in making this extra-horrendous –  Mathias Apr 13 '10 at 20:51
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You just need a little self referencing, and you can call it as many times as you like:

delegate Foo Foo();

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Foo f = null;
        f = () => f;
        // Add more "()" as you feel like...
        f()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()();
    }
}
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+1: Very neat and clever. –  Callum Rogers Apr 18 '10 at 18:18
    
Here f is an "identity" function of a different sort, returning itself (rather than its parameter). –  Mechanical snail Aug 29 '11 at 5:43
    
+1 for being arbitrarily extensible! –  Mechanical snail Aug 29 '11 at 5:43
add comment
static void Foo()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");
}

static Action Bar()
{
    return new Action(Foo);
}

static void Main()
{
    Func<Action> func = new Func<Action>(Bar);
    func()();

    Bar()();
}

prints

Hello World!
Hello World!

This works, because func() and Bar() return an Action delegate which can be invoked using normal method invocation syntax.

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I think this is the most common case; code that needs to lookup a different delegate depending upon the circumstances. I've got some code that does ConstructFunc(key)(obj). –  Porges Apr 13 '10 at 22:15
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Something like:

delegate void FunctionA();
delegate FunctionA FunctionB();

void TestA() { }
FunctionA TestB() { return TestA; }

void Main()
{
   TestB()();
}
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If you have a function that returns a delegate that you would commonly then attach to a signal, but you want to just call that function right away, you might use this syntax.

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Also, check out this blog post by Bertrand Leroy for something similar: http://weblogs.asp.net/bleroy/archive/2010/03/30/a-c-implementation-of-the-callstream-pattern.aspx

But that actually does something semi-useful :)

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Awesome! Could be a nice way do something similar to Haskell's do-notation... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 13 '10 at 21:23
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