Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing some Javascript to resize the large image to fit into the user's browser window. (I don't control the size of the source images unfortunately.)

So something like this would be in the HTML:

<img id="photo"
     src="a_really_big_file.jpg"
     alt="this is some alt text"
     title="this is some title text" />

Is there a way for me to determine if the src image in an img tag has been downloaded?

I need this because I'm running into a problem if $(document).ready() is executed before the browser has loaded the image. $("#photo").width() and $("#photo").height() will return the size of the placeholder (the alt text). In my case this is something like 134 x 20.

Right now I'm just checking if the photo's height is less than 150, and assuming that if so it is just alt text. But this is quite a hack, and it would break if a photo is less than 150 pixels tall (not likely in my particular case), or if the alt text is more than 150 pixels tall (could possibly happen on a small browser window).


Edit: For anyone wanting to see the code:

$(function()
{
  var REAL_WIDTH = $("#photo").width();
  var REAL_HEIGHT = $("#photo").height();

  $(window).resize(adjust_photo_size);
  adjust_photo_size();

  function adjust_photo_size()
  {
    if(REAL_HEIGHT < 150)
    {
      REAL_WIDTH = $("#photo").width();
      REAL_HEIGHT = $("#photo").height();
      if(REAL_HEIGHT < 150)
      {
        //image not loaded.. try again in a quarter-second
        setTimeout(adjust_photo_size, 250);
        return;
      }
    }

    var new_width = . . . ;
    var new_height = . . . ;

    $("#photo").width(Math.round(new_width));
    $("#photo").height(Math.round(new_height));
  }

});


Update: Thanks for the suggestions. There is a risk of the event not being fired if I set a callback for the $("#photo").load event, so I have defined an onLoad event directly on the image tag. For the record, here is the code I ended up going with:

<img id="photo"
     onload="photoLoaded();"
     src="a_really_big_file.jpg"
     alt="this is some alt text"
     title="this is some title text" />

Then in Javascript:

//This must be outside $() because it may get called first
var isPhotoLoaded = false;
function photoLoaded()
{
  isPhotoLoaded = true;
}

$(function()
{
  //Hides scrollbars, so we can resize properly.  Set with JS instead of
  //  CSS so that page doesn't break with JS disabled.
  $("body").css("overflow", "hidden");

  var REAL_WIDTH = -1;
  var REAL_HEIGHT = -1;

  $(window).resize(adjust_photo_size);
  adjust_photo_size();

  function adjust_photo_size()
  {
    if(!isPhotoLoaded)
    {
      //image not loaded.. try again in a quarter-second
      setTimeout(adjust_photo_size, 250);
      return;
    }
    else if(REAL_WIDTH < 0)
    {
      //first time in this function since photo loaded
      REAL_WIDTH = $("#photo").width();
      REAL_HEIGHT = $("#photo").height();
    }

    var new_width = . . . ;
    var new_height = . . . ;

    $("#photo").width(Math.round(new_width));
    $("#photo").height(Math.round(new_height));
  }

});
share|improve this question
1  
This is so old and you've already accepted an answer, so I will just comment here. Why can't you use the jQuery plugin 'onImagesLoad'? And also, jQuery or not, what is wrong with setting max-width and max-height in the image styling with Javascript? You then avoid ALL of the code you've needed to write by setting max width/height to the size of the viewport width/height. –  jonwd7 Jan 22 '10 at 21:13
    
@jon.wd7: i'm not familiar with that plugin, and it may not have been around way back in '08. as for max-width and max-height, two things: 1) they aren't supported in IE (well I'm not sure about IE 8); 2) if the viewport changes size (window is resized, etc.) then i'd still need javascript to change the max-width/max-height (although i may not if i used "100%" rather than a pixel measurement) –  Kip Jan 22 '10 at 21:27
    
It's definitely supported in IE7 and IE8, according to quirksmode.org. So I'm not sure of your issue. I personally don't support IE6 for small things like this, so what they will see is the same thing a user without JS enabled would see. And of course you would need to reset max-width and max-height on resize. But that's quite an easy task, a one-liner using .resize() in fact. –  jonwd7 Jan 22 '10 at 21:31
1  
The complete property gives the imperative way of knowing whether the image has been loaded. –  incarnate Sep 23 '13 at 17:56
add comment

11 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Either add an event listener, or have the image announce itself with onload. Then figure out the dimensions from there.

<img id="photo"
     onload='loaded(this.id)'
     src="a_really_big_file.jpg"
     alt="this is some alt text"
     title="this is some title text" />
share|improve this answer
    
According to spec, onload is only an event for the body and frameset elements; that said, I think this works in IE, but I don't know that it works in any other browsers or that it is something you can assume...I was just looking into this a couple of weeks ago... –  Jason Bunting Nov 5 '08 at 6:06
    
I have tested it in IE6, IE7, FF3, Opera9, Safair (Windows Beta), and Chrome (Windows Beta). –  Kip Nov 5 '08 at 14:48
6  
Messing behavior and content is discouraged. Events should be applied using Javascript, not in HTML. –  dionyziz Dec 14 '12 at 8:25
5  
His comment IS relevant since we are not stuck in 2008. People still read this, and even tho it wasn't considered bad practice in 08, you dont want people to think its good practice now. –  Mathias Madsen Stav Mar 5 '13 at 12:28
1  
document.querySelector("img").addEventListener("load", function() { alert('onload!'); }); –  Frank Schwieterman Nov 27 '13 at 22:19
show 2 more comments

Using the jquery data store you can define a 'loaded' state.

<img id="myimage" onload="$(this).data('loaded', 'loaded');" src="lolcats.jpg" />

Then elsewhere you can do:

if ($('#myimage').data('loaded')) {
    // loaded, so do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Use jQuery(this) instead of $(this) for better compatibility with other libraries(jquery doesn't own the $), especially when you have JavaScript in html. –  John Magnolia May 16 '13 at 13:30
add comment

The right answer, is to use event.special.load

It is possible that the load event will not be triggered if the image is loaded from the browser cache. To account for this possibility, we can use a special load event that fires immediately if the image is ready. event.special.load is currently available as a plugin.

Per the docs on .load()

share|improve this answer
2  
I was going to add an answer with a suggestion like this, glad I saw this answer before coding it. Basically, your handlers needs to first check if the image is loaded before setting the handler. If it's already loaded, fire the callback immediately. It's what $.ready does. I was going to suggest just checking the width, but that has its problems, I really like that solution. –  Juan Mendes Mar 12 '13 at 19:11
add comment

You want to do what Allain said, however be aware that sometimes the image loads before dom ready, which means your load handler won't fire. The best way is to do as Allain says, but set the src of the image with javascript after attaching the load hander. This way you can guarantee that it fires.

In terms of accessibility, will your site still work for people without javascript? You may want to give the img tag the correct src, attach you dom ready handler to run your js: clear the image src (give it a fixed with and height with css to prevent the page flickering), then set your img load handler, then reset the src to the correct file. This way you cover all bases :)

share|improve this answer
    
The site still works for people without Javascript, they just have to scroll to see all of the image. –  Kip Nov 5 '08 at 14:49
add comment

Try something like:

$("#photo").load(function() {
    alert("Hello from Image");
});
share|improve this answer
4  
Thanks. However, there is a possibility that the image has already been loaded before this happens, in which case the load event wouldn't be fired. –  Kip Nov 5 '08 at 14:47
    
How about a script tag setting this event right after the image tag? The reason to use ready is to make sure the entire document is loaded, which is unnecessary in this case, right? –  Jason Goemaat Sep 28 '10 at 22:02
add comment

There's a jQuery plugin called "imagesLoaded" that provides a cross-browser compatible method to check if an element's image(s) have been loaded.

Site: https://github.com/desandro/imagesloaded/

Usage for a container that has many images inside:

$('container').imagesLoaded(function(){
 console.log("I loaded!");
})

The plugin is great:

  1. works for checking a container with many images inside
  2. works for check an img to see if it has loaded
share|improve this answer
add comment

Here you have an example of adding a callback after the image has finished loading.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Any comments on this one?

...

doShow = function(){
  if($('#img_id').attr('complete')){
    alert('Image is loaded!');
  } else {
    window.setTimeout('doShow()',100);
  }
};

$('#img_id').attr('src','image.jpg');

doShow();

...

Seems like works everywhere...

share|improve this answer
    
Does not work in Chrome 32.0.1700.107. –  Nate Feb 17 at 20:57
add comment

I just created a jQuery function to load an image using jQuerys Deferred Object which makes it very easy to react on load/error event:

$.fn.extend({
    loadImg: function(url, timeout) {
        // init deferred object
        var defer = $.Deferred(),
            $img = this,
            img = $img.get(0),
            timer = null;

        // define load and error events BEFORE setting the src
        // otherwise IE might fire the event before listening to it
        $img.load(function(e) {
            var that = this;
            // defer this check in order to let IE catch the right image size
            window.setTimeout(function() {
                // make sure the width and height are > 0
                ((that.width > 0 && that.height > 0) ? 
                    defer.resolveWith : 
                    defer.rejectWith)($img);
            }, 1);
        }).error(function(e) {
            defer.rejectWith($img);
        });

        // start loading the image
        img.src = url;

        // check if it's already in the cache
        if (img.complete) {
            defer.resolveWith($img);
        } else if (0 !== timeout) {
            // add a timeout, by default 15 seconds
            timer = window.setTimeout(function() {
                defer.rejectWith($img);
            }, timeout || 15000);
        }

        // return the promise of the deferred object
        return defer.promise().always(function() {
            // stop the timeout timer
            window.clearTimeout(timer);
            timer = null;
            // unbind the load and error event
            this.off("load error");
        });
    }
});

Usage:

var image = $('<img />').loadImg('http://www.google.com/intl/en_com/images/srpr/logo3w.png')
.done(function() {
    alert('image loaded');
    $('body').append(this);
}).fail(function(){
    alert('image failed');
});

See it working at: http://jsfiddle.net/roberkules/AdWZj/

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds wonderful. Can you please give an exact example of when your code is preferable to img.onload and img.onerror? Is your code only meant to handle the seeming shortcomings of jQuery error handling I was just informed about: that error does not trigger in IE if there is no file extension? –  mplungjan Jun 12 '12 at 5:44
    
interesting idea. so knowing when image done its easy. But, what if the imaged couldn't be loaded. I was searching for a way to know if the loading the image has failed. and you gave me the idea of timeout onloading it. +1 for that –  oak Feb 7 at 8:15
1  
@oak the timeout should be only a fallback. most browsers should fire an error event which is handled by .error(function(e) { defer.rejectWith($img); }). If you look at the jsFiddle you will see that the http://www.google.com/abc.png not found text is shown immediately in the results pane (not waiting for a timeout, because the error event kicked in) –  roberkules Feb 7 at 15:38
    
hu. thanks! didn't know the img has "error" event –  oak Feb 10 at 13:44
    
note that for jquery to raise .error two things should be 1. the handle but be set before the error raised. 2. .error handles only http protocol and not file:// so you wont get error there.. –  oak Feb 10 at 14:10
show 1 more comment

This function checks if an image is loaded based on having measurable dimensions. This technique is useful if your script is executing after some of the images have already been loaded.

imageLoaded = function(node) {
    var w = 'undefined' != typeof node.clientWidth ? node.clientWidth : node.offsetWidth;
    var h = 'undefined' != typeof node.clientHeight ? node.clientHeight : node.offsetHeight;
    return w+h > 0 ? true : false;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I discovered this solution may require that there be no margin or padding on the image, and that alt text of an empty string is provided. In most cases though, it works as intended. It will only fail if the size of the unloaded image is larger than zero. –  Ralph Ritoch Aug 10 '13 at 9:42
add comment

As per one of the recent comments to your original question

$(function() {

  $(window).resize(adjust_photo_size);
  adjust_photo_size();

  function adjust_photo_size()  {
    if (!$("#photo").get(0).complete) {
       $("#photo").load(function() {
          adjust_photo_size();
       });
    } else {
      ... 
    }
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.