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I was wondering if this was possible...

I have a sequence of variables that have to be assigned to a do.something (a, b) a and b variables accordingly.

Something like this:

# # Have a list of sequenced variables.
list = 2:90 , 1:140 , 3:-40 , 4:60

# # "Template" on where to assign the variables from the list.    
do.something (a,b)
# # Assign the variables from the list in a sequence with possibility of "in between" functions like print and time.sleep() added.

do.something (2,90)
time.sleep(1)
print "Did something (%d,%d)" % (# # vars from list?)   
do.something (1,140)
time.sleep(1)
print "Did something (%d,%d)" % (# # vars from list?)  
do.something (3,-40)
time.sleep(1)
print "Did something (%d,%d)" % (# # vars from list?)  
do.something (4,60)
time.sleep(1)
print "Did something (%d,%d)" % (# # vars from list?)  

Any ideas?

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Why not use list = ((2,90), (1,140), ...)? –  KennyTM Apr 13 '10 at 22:22
    
@Matti Virkkunen. :) thanks for the tip. Didn't even know that you had to do that. –  wtz Apr 13 '10 at 22:49
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted
arglist = [(2, 90), (1, 140), (3, -40), (4, 60)]
for args in arglist:
    do.something(*args)
    time.sleep(1)
    print "Did something (%d,%d)" % args

The * means "use the values in this tuple as the arguments". Hint: you can do the same with keyword arguments by using ** and a dict.

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2  
Using list as a variable name is not kosher in python. –  alex vasi Apr 13 '10 at 22:28
1  
Woops, good point... let's not override built-in types. Fixed. –  Matti Virkkunen Apr 13 '10 at 22:29
    
To be fair, Python doesn't care. At least, not until it hits a line where the programmer wanted to use the list type but forgot that he used the name for something else. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 13 '10 at 22:41
    
Of course it doesn't, but writing code that breaks everyone's expectations is usually not a good idea. –  Matti Virkkunen Apr 13 '10 at 22:45
    
This is sweet! Perfect! Thank you guys! –  wtz Apr 13 '10 at 22:57
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