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Best way to detect integer overflow in C/C++

There's (1):

// assume x,y are non-negative
if(x > max - y) error;

And (2):

// assume x,y are non-negative
int sum = x + y;
if(sum < x || sum < y) error;

Whichs is preferred or is there a better way.

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marked as duplicate by Fred Larson, Greg Hewgill, N 1.1, James McNellis, kennytm Apr 13 '10 at 23:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Actually the duplicate is not a duplicate at all, it is talking about unsigned that have well-defined wraparound semantics, whereas overflowing a signed integer is undefined behaviour in C. –  Antti Haapala Mar 16 at 15:33

3 Answers 3

Integer overflow is the canonical example of "undefined behaviour" in C (noting that operations on unsigned integers never overflow, they are defined to wrap-around instead). This means that once you've executed x + y, if it overflowed, you're already hosed. It's too late to do any checking - your program could have crashed already. Think of it like checking for division by zero - if you wait until after the division has been executed to check, it's already too late.

So this implies that method (1) is the only correct way to do it. For max, you can use INT_MAX from <limits.h>.

If x and/or y can be negative, then things are harder - you need to do the test in such a way that the test itself can't cause overflow.

if ((y > 0 && x > INT_MAX - y) ||
    (y < 0 && x < INT_MIN - y))
{
    /* Oh no, overflow */
}
else
{
    sum = x + y;
}
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1  
If you're going to downvote, it's considered courteous to leave a comment explaining what you feel is unhelpful or wrong. –  caf Aug 30 '11 at 3:16
    
Btw, can you comment on the performance of this solution compared to other alternative solutions? –  Pacerier Sep 22 '13 at 18:10
4  
It makes little sense to compare the performance against an incorrect solution. What other correct solution did you have in mind? –  caf Sep 23 '13 at 1:04
    
the other usual way seem to be casting to a wider type. I'm not sure of a third alternative but there are surely more. –  Pacerier Sep 24 '13 at 4:12

You can really only check for overflow with unsigned integers and arithmatic:

unsigned a,b,c;
a = b + c;
if (a < b) {
    /* overflow */
}

The behavior of overflow with signed integers is undefined in C, but on most machines you can use

int a,b,c;
a = b + c;
if (c < 0 ? a > b : a < b) {
    /* overflow */
}

This won't work on machines that use any kind of saturating arithmetic

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You only have to check one of them. If x + y overflows, it will be less than both x and y. Hence:

int sum = x + y;
if (sum < x) error;

should be sufficient.

The following site has a bunch of stuff about integer overflow:

http://www.fefe.de/intof.html

If you want to handle negative numbers, it can be expanded:

int sum = x + y;
if (y >= 0) {
   if (sum < x) error;
} else {
   if (sum > x) error;
}
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1  
What if y is negative? –  Fred Larson Apr 13 '10 at 22:39
1  
The original poster specified non-negative integers, but I've added code to handle negative numbers. –  clahey Apr 13 '10 at 22:40
15  
This isn't correct - once x + y has overflowed, the program has undefined behaviour. You have to check before you actually execute the overflowing operation - just as you do for integer division by zero. –  caf Apr 13 '10 at 23:28
    
If anything is more wrong than this answer, then possibly the page it links to. –  Antti Haapala Mar 16 at 15:28

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