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The challenge

The shortest code by character count that will output the numeric equivalent of an Excel column string.

For example, the A column is 1, B is 2, so on and so forth. Once you hit Z, the next column becomes AA, then AB and so on.

Test cases:

A:    1
B:    2
AD:   30
ABC:  731
WTF:  16074
ROFL: 326676

Code count includes input/output (i.e full program).

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19  
Code golf is pointless, APL always wins in the end. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 14 '10 at 3:09
1  
When you post a solution, please make sure it works across all the cases above (input/output as run is nice), and note where it does not. Thanks. –  user166390 Apr 16 '10 at 18:49
3  
Why the hell is this tagged with rosetta-stone?! –  Josh Stodola Apr 16 '10 at 19:59
2  
J is APL without the Greek. J will always win, no one speaks APL anymore. –  Callum Rogers Apr 16 '10 at 21:48
1  
@BlueRaja: It's interesting that APL is still winning these things in 2010, almost 40 years after it left the mainstream. –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 16 '10 at 21:58

67 Answers 67

in VBA I got it down to 98

Sub G(s)
Dim i, t
For i = 0 To Len(s) - 1
    t = t + ((Asc(Left(Right(s, i + 1), 1)) - 64)) * ((26 ^ i))
Next
MsgBox t
End Sub
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3  
Surely you don't need the indentation. –  user181548 Apr 14 '10 at 8:28

Ruby, 20 characters

p('A'..$*[0]).count

Usage:

$ ruby a.rb ABC
731
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Perl, 120 characters

chomp($n=<>);@c=split(//,uc($n));$o=64;$b=0;$l=$#c;for($i=$l;$i>=0;$i--){$b+=((26**($l-$i))*(ord($c[$i])-$o));}print$b;

Usage:

vivin@serenity ~/Projects/code/perl/excelc
$ echo WTF | perl e.pl
16074
vivin@serenity ~/Projects/code/perl/excelc
$ echo ROFL | perl e.pl
326676

I'm sure some of the Perl gurus here can come up with something way smaller.

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Perl, 47 characters (from stdin)

chop($l=<>);$_=A;$.++,$_++while$_ ne$l;die$.,$/
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JavaScript, 93 characters

with(prompt())for(l=length,i=0,v=i--;++i<l;)v+=(charCodeAt(l-1-i)-64)*Math.pow(26,i);alert(v)
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Lua, 61 characters

x=0 for c in(...):gfind(".")do x=x*26-64+c:byte()end print(x)
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wazoox:

echo -n WTF | perl -ple '$=()=A..$'

This prints a new line so the answer is more readable on the shell.

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Smalltalk, 72

Smalltalk arguments first reverse inject:0into:[:o :e|o*26+e digitValue]
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Applescript: 188
Here's the requisite applescript in 188 characters, which is a very difficult language to make non-verbose. It also happens to be the longest answer of any language so far. If anyone knows how to shorten it, do share.

on run s  
 set {o, c} to {0, 0}  
 repeat with i in reverse of (s's item 1)'s characters  
  set m to 26 ^ c as integer  
  set c to c + 1  
  set o to o + ((ASCII number of i) - 64) * m  
 end repeat  
end run

Usage:
osascript /path/to/script.scpt ROFL

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PHP: 56 55 characters

for($i='a';$i++!=strtolower($argv[1]);@$c++){}echo++$c;

PHP: 44 43 characters only for uppercase letters

for($i='A';$i++!=$argv[1];@$c++){}echo++$c;

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PHP, 38 chars

for($a=A;++$c,$a++!=$argv[1];);echo$c;

usage, e.g.

php -r 'for($a=A;++$c,$a++!=$argv[1];);echo$c;' WTF
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APL: 7 characters

Store desired string in variable w:

w←'rofl'

Assuming characters are lowercase:

26⊥⎕a⍳w

Assuming characters are uppercase:

26⊥⎕A⍳w

Mixed case or unsure of case (14 chars, but could possibly be improved):

26⊥⊃⌊/⎕a⎕A⍳¨⊂w
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Python

import string

letters = string.uppercase
colnum = lambda s: sum((letters.index(let)+1)*26**idx for idx, let in enumerate(s[::-1]))

print colnum('WTF') 
# 16074
print colnum('ROFL')
# 326676
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Java, 164 characters

public class A{public static void main(String[] z){int o=0,c=0;for(int i=z[0].length()-1;i>=0;i--,c++)o+=(z[0].charAt(i)-64)*Math.pow(26,c);System.out.println(o);}}

Java, 177 characters

public class A
{
public static void main(String[] z)
{
    int m,o=0,c=0;
    for(int i=z[0].length()-1;i>=0;i--,c++)
    {
        m=(int)Math.pow(26,c);
        o+=(z[0].charAt(i)-64)*m;
    }
    System.out.println(o);
}
}

Assumes an uppercase input (via command line argument). The obvious approach with no tricks.

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dc - 20 chars

(does the opposite)

dc can't handle character input, so I coded the opposite: input the column number and output the column name:

?[26~64+rd0<LP]dsLxP
dc exccol.dc
326676
 ROFL
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My Javascript solution is just 82 characters long and uses Integer.parseInt with Radix 36. It'd be fine if somebody could appen this to the Javascript section of this thread! :-)

a=function(b){t=0;b.split('').map(function(n){t=parseInt(n,36)-9+t*26});return t};
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PHP:

<?$t=0;$s=str_split($argv[1]);$z=count($s);foreach($s as$v){$z--;$t+=(ord($v)-64)*pow(26,$z);}echo$t?>

usage: php filename.php ROFL

outputs: 326676

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Python (47 chars)

reduce(lambda a,b:a*26+ord(b)-64,raw_input(),0)

works only on uppercase letters

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Matlab 38 chars


Works only with uppercase letters. Not sure if it has to work with lowercase too (none in example).

x=input('')'-64;26.^(size(x)-1:-1:0)*x

If new lines do not count only 37 (omitting semicolon):

x=input('')'-64
26.^(size(x)-1:-1:0)*x

I see Matlab beats a lot of languages. Who would expect that.

Example:

Input: 'ROFL' (dont forget the '' )
Output: ans = 326676
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Factor: 47 characters

reverse [ 26 swap ^ swap 64 - * ] map-index sum

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Prolog: 49 chars

c([],A,A).
c([H|T],I,R):-J is H-64+I*26,c(T,J,R).

Using the above code:

| ?- c("WTF",0,R).
R = 16074 ? 
yes
| ?- c("ROFL",0,R).
R = 326676 ? 
yes
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php 29 chars:


while($i++!=$t)$c++;echo$c+1;

  • assuming register_globals=On
  • assuming error_reporting=0
  • call via webserver ?i=A&t=ABC
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Python: 88 characters

using list comprehensions:

s=input()
print sum([((26**(len(s)-i-1))*(ord(s[i])-64)) for i in range(len(s))])
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Josl in 48 characters

main 0 0 argv each 64 - swap 26 * + next print

Examples:

$ josl numequiv.j A
1
$ josl numequiv.j ABC
731
$ josl numequiv.j ROFL
326676

Reading from standard input:

main 0 STDIN read-line each 64 - swap 26 * + next print
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OOBasic: 178 characters, not counting indentational whitespace

revised

This version passes all the test cases. I suspect that it would be more successfully golf if it didn't "take advantage" of the fact that there's a spreadsheet using this numbering system. See the notes on the original version below for info on why that's not particularly useful. I didn't try very hard to cut down the score.

Also note that this will only work when run as a macro from an OO calc spreadsheet, for obvious reasons.

Function C(st as String) as Long
    C = 0
    while len(st)
        C = C*26 + ThisComponent.Sheets(0).getCellRangeByName(left(st,1) &"1").CellAddress.Column+1
        st = mid(st,2)
    wend
End Function

original

OOBasic (OpenOffice Basic), too many characters (124):

Function C(co As String) As Long 
    C = ThisComponent.Sheets(0).getCellRangeByName(co &"1").CellAddress.Column+1
End Function

Limitations:

  • maximum value of co is AMJ (1024 columns). Anything larger results in an error with a completely uninformative error message.
    • This limitation is also present for the COLUMN() cell function. Presumably this is the maximum number of columns in an OOCalc spreadsheet; I didn't bother scrolling over that far or googling to find out.

Notes:

  • strangely it's not possible to give the variable 'co' a 1-letter name. Not sure what the logic is behind this, but after having spent enough time using OOBasic you stop looking for logic and begin to blindly accept the way things are (perhaps from gazing too long at the Sun).

Anyway entering =C("A"), =C("ABC"), etc. in a cell works for the first four test cases; the last two give errors.

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straight bash

filter: 97 chars

{ read c;i=0;while [ $c ];do eval s=({A..${c:0:1}});i=$((i*26+${#s[@]}));c=${c:1};done;echo $i;}

Usage:

echo ROFL | { read c;i=0;while [ $c ];do eval s=({A..${c:0:1}});i=$((i*26+${#s[@]}));c=${c:1};done;echo $i;}
326676

function: 98 chars

C(){ i=0;while [ $1 ];do eval s=({A..${1:0:1}});i=$((i*26+${#s[@]}));set -- ${1:1};done;echo $i;}

Usage:

C ROFL
326676

Explanation of the filter version:

read c;i=0;

Initialize the column and the total.

while [ $c ];do

while there are still column characters left

eval s=({A..${c:0:1}});

${c:0:1} returns the first character of the column; s=({A..Z}) makes s an array containing the letters from A to Z

i=$((i*26+${#s[@]}));

$((...)) wraps an arithmetic evaluation; ${#s[@]} is the number of elements in the array $s

c=${c:1};done;

${c:1} is the characters in $c after the first. done ends the while loop

echo $i

um i forget

better but dubious

Removing the 5 characters "echo " will result in the output for an input of "ROFL" being

326676: command not found

Also the i=0 is probably not necessary if you're sure that you don't have that variable set in your current shell.

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F# (37 chars):

Seq.fold (fun n c -> int c-64+26*n) 0
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K 3.2 (13 characters)

26_sv -64+_ic

Usage:

  26_sv -64+_ic"ROFL"
326676

Explanation:

  • As mentioned above K evaluates from right to left, so the _ic function takes whatever is to its right and converts it to an integer value, this includes both single characters and character vectors
  • -64 is added to each item in the integer vector that to get a set of base values
  • _sv takes two arguments: the one on its left is the numeric base, 26, and the one on its right is the integer vector of offset values
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Excel VBA, 19 characters:

range("WTF").Column

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Ruby solution in 26 chars

p ("A"..$*[0]).to_a.size

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