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I need to implement a FIFO queue for messages on a game server so it needs to as fast as possible. There will be a queue for each user.

The queue will have a maxiumem size (lets say 2000). The size won't change during runtime.

I need to prioritize messages ONLY if the queue reaches its maximum size by working backwards and removing a lower priority message (if one exists) before adding the new message.

A priority is an int with possible values of 1, 3, 5, 7, 10.

There can be multiple messages with the same priority.

A message cannot change its priority once allocated.

The application is asynchronous so access to the queue needs to be locked.

I'm currently implementing it using a LinkedList as the underlying storage but have concerns that searching and removing nodes will keep it locked for too long.

Heres the basic code I have at the moment:

public class ActionQueue
{
    private LinkedList<ClientAction> _actions = new LinkedList<ClientAction>();
    private int _maxSize;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the ActionQueue class.
    /// </summary>
    public ActionQueue(int maxSize)
    {
        _maxSize = maxSize;
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return _actions.Count; }            
    }

    public void Enqueue(ClientAction action)
    {
        lock (_actions)
        {
            if (Count < _maxSize)
                _actions.AddLast(action);
            else
            {
                LinkedListNode<ClientAction> node = _actions.Last;
                while (node != null)
                {
                    if (node.Value.Priority < action.Priority)
                    {
                        _actions.Remove(node);
                        _actions.AddLast(action);
                        break;
                    }

                    node = node.Previous;

                }                    
            }
        }
    }

    public ClientAction Dequeue()
    {
        ClientAction action = null;

        lock (_actions)
        {
            action = _actions.First.Value;
            _actions.RemoveFirst();
        }

        return action;
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Not enough information in my opinion. Are priorities bounded or unbounded? Will your queue hold a few 10s or items or potentially 10s of 1000s? Do you need a mutable priority queue or an immutable one? Can you list some supported operations and desired computational complexity? Do you need to support operations in realtime, or is amortized O(1) acceptable? etc. –  Juliet Apr 14 '10 at 2:42
    
Are these fixed priorities and what is their range? –  RBarryYoung Apr 14 '10 at 2:42
1  
@Juliet: Ha. I ask people in interviews "How would you implement a priority queue?" all the time. Most people get it done, but they never ask about range on priorities, number of items, or what cost operations need to have. You, my friend, are hired! :) –  Esteban Araya Apr 14 '10 at 3:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So we have the following properties:

  • Priorities are well-defined and bounded
  • Needs to be thread-safe
  • Queue size is fixed to 2000 messages, where enqueues beyond this drop the lowest item

Its very easy to write a priority queue which supports all of these properties:

public class BoundedPriorityQueue<T>
{
    private object locker;
    private int maxSize;
    private int count;
    private LinkedList<T>[] Buckets;

    public BoundedPriorityQueue(int buckets, int maxSize)
    {
        this.locker = new object();
        this.maxSize = maxSize;
        this.count = 0;
        this.Buckets = new LinkedList<T>[buckets];
        for (int i = 0; i < Buckets.Length; i++)
        {
            this.Buckets[i] = new LinkedList<T>();
        }
    }

    public bool TryUnsafeEnqueue(T item, int priority)
    {
        if (priority < 0 || priority >= Buckets.Length)
            throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("priority");

        Buckets[priority].AddLast(item);
        count++;

        if (count > maxSize)
        {
            UnsafeDiscardLowestItem();
            Debug.Assert(count <= maxSize, "Collection Count should be less than or equal to MaxSize");
        }

        return true; // always succeeds
    }

    public bool TryUnsafeDequeue(out T res)
    {
        LinkedList<T> bucket = Buckets.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Count > 0);
        if (bucket != null)
        {
            res = bucket.First.Value;
            bucket.RemoveFirst();
            count--;
            return true; // found item, succeeds
        }
        res = default(T);
        return false; // didn't find an item, fail
    }

    private void UnsafeDiscardLowestItem()
    {
        LinkedList<T> bucket = Buckets.Reverse().FirstOrDefault(x => x.Count > 0);
        if (bucket != null)
        {
            bucket.RemoveLast();
            count--;
        }
    }

    public bool TryEnqueue(T item, int priority)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            return TryUnsafeEnqueue(item, priority);
        }
    }

    public bool TryDequeue(out T res)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            return TryUnsafeDequeue(out res);
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { lock (locker) { return count; } }
    }

    public int MaxSize
    {
        get { return maxSize; }
    }

    public object SyncRoot
    {
        get { return locker; }
    }
}

Supports Enqueue/Dequeue in O(1) time, the TryEnqueue and TryDequeue methods are guaranteed to be thread-safe, and the size of the collection will never exceed the max size you specify in the constructor.

The locks on TryEnqueue and TryDequeue are pretty fine-grained, so you might take a performance hit whenever you need to bulk-load or unload data. If you need to load the queue with a lot of data up front, then lock on the SyncRoot and call the unsafe methods as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure about the O(1) on the Dequeue? This code LinkedList<T> bucket = Buckets.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Count > 0); would make it dependent on the number of priorities. I would think a good heap implementation would be the way to go. –  Chris Taylor Apr 14 '10 at 5:06

A vetted implementation of priority queue for C#/.NET can be found in the C5 Generic Collection Library in the C5.IntervalHeap<T> class.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Priority queues are usually implemented using heaps, but there is no heap class in the .net library. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 14 '10 at 3:05

I'm assuming you can have duplicate priorities.

There's no container within .NET that allows duplicate keys akin to a C++ multimap. You could do this in a few different ways, either with a SortedList that had an array of values for each priority key (and grab the first item out of that array as the return value); the SortedList is a balanced tree underneath (IIRC) and should give you good insert and retrieval performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Lookups were added 3.5 which might help a little here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb460184.aspx –  Michael Haren Apr 14 '10 at 3:39

If you have a fixed number of priorities, I'd just create a composite Queue class that wraps two or more private Queues.

A drastically simplified example follows although you could expand on it by adding a Priority enum and a switch to determine where to Enqueue an item.

class PriorityQueue {

    private readonly Queue normalQueue = new Queue();
    private readonly Queue urgentQueue = new Queue();

    public object Dequeue() {
        if (urgentQueue.Count > 0) { return urgentQueue.Dequeue(); }
        if (normalQueue.Count > 0) { return normalQueue.Dequeue(); }
        return null;
    }

    public void Enqueue(object item, bool urgent) {
        if (urgent) { urgentQueue.Enqueue(item); }
        else { normalQueue.Enqueue(item); }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For two priorities, your implementation is fine, but anything more than that should really use a Queue[] instead. –  Juliet Apr 14 '10 at 3:38
    
Given the small number of priorities in the question this is works really well (with an array) AND it reduces locking contention on insert since you don't need to lock all the queues to add an item. Nice! –  Ian Mercer Apr 14 '10 at 5:24
    
@Juliet: Agreed. @Hightechrider: You could even use a simple lock-free immutable queue implementation to avoid contention altogether. –  Josh Apr 14 '10 at 5:49
    
How do you know the order of queued messages because it looks like it always processes the urgent ones first. The question requires a FIFO queue regardless of priority and ONLY when the maximum queue size is reached does it start dropping the last message added that is a lower priority than the message you are tyring to add? –  Nathan Smith Apr 14 '10 at 19:07

It really depends on the distribution of queue lengths you are likely to see. 2000 is the max but what's the average and what does the distribution look like? If N is typically small, a simple List<> with a brute force search for next lowest may be a fine choice.

Have you profiled your application to know this is a bottleneck?

          "Never underestimate the power of a smart compiler 
           and a smart CPU with registers and on-chip memory 
           to run dumb algorithms really fast"
share|improve this answer
    
Good question. This will be a contention point for about a hundred asynchrounous threads trying to add messages to this queue class. It is imperative that the lock time is cut down as small as possible. –  Nathan Smith Apr 14 '10 at 3:50
    
Josh's answer reduces contention by spreading it across multiple queues. –  Ian Mercer Apr 14 '10 at 5:28

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