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I have a class that has a method. That class has a child class that overrides that method. The child's method has to call the parent's method. In all OO that I've seen or written calls to the parent's version of the same method were on the first line of the method. On a project that I am working on circumstances call for placing that method call at the end of a method. Should I be worried? Is that a code smell? Is this code inherently bad?

class Parent {
    function work() {
        // stuff
    }
}

class Child {
    function work() {
        // do thing 1
        // do thing 2
        parent::work(); // is this a bad practice?
        // should I call the parent's work() method before 
        // I do anything in this method?
    }
}
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1  
There's a joke in here somewhere about parents doing more work than the child, and slogging through miles of snow to get to school... –  Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 14 '10 at 5:04

4 Answers 4

As you said yourself, circumstances called for that ordering. There are no stylistic "rules" as to the order in which a parent's implementation has to be called, it fully depends on implementation-specific factors. You may even find instances in which the parent implementation has to be called conditionally.

The only special cases when it makes sense for parent implementations to always be called first (or last) are constructors (and destructors). In these cases, ordering is important so that, by the time thing1 and thing2 (in your example) execute, your object's ancestry has already been fully constructed (or not yet destructed.) In all other cases (regular methods) it is up to you to pick the ordering which best suits your business logic needs.

This having been said, coming back to your example, I'd worry more about whether you want work() to be virtual or not in those languages where this is an option. :)

class BasicLogger {
    BasicLogger() {
        // open log file
    }
    virtual function log(string s) {
        // write to log file
    }
}

class TimestampedLogger extends BasicLogger {
    TimestampedLogger () {
        // consructor calling order enforced in most OOP languages
        BasicLogger();           // must be called first to open log file,
        log("logging started");  //  or else writing to the log will fail
    }
    virtual function log(string s) {
        s = timestamp() + ": " + s;
        super.log(s); // nothing wrong with this
    }
}

class ConditionalLogger extends TimestampedLogger {
    ConditionalLogger () {
        TimestampedLogger();
        log("log level is " + logLevel());
    }
    virtual function log(string s) {
        if (logLevel() > INFO) {
            super.log(s); // nothing wrong with this either
        }
    }
}
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When I have come up against this need, particularly if there are several derived types involved and more may need to be written in the future, I like to take a slightly different approach. For example:

case Base {
  public:
    void MethodToBeCalled() {
      ...
      Derived_MethodToBeCalled();
    }

    virtual void Derived_MethodToBeCalled() {
      // Intentionally left blank and to be overridden by Derived classes
    }
};

case Derived: public Base {
  public:
    virtual void Derived_MethodToBeCalled() {
      ... // Do the work needed by the derived class
    }
};

Pros:

  1. Less error prone for developers of derived classes since they don't have to remember to call the base class or where to put that call.
  2. Specially useful when there are many derived classes that need to be developed by many developers.

Cons:

  1. Clutters up the public interface of the base class.

Is this smelly?

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There are two aspects to your question. Calling overriden method is a smell - the parent class should either define the method abstract (virtual), final (not overridable) or empty. If it isn't empty, you don't know what it does, how can it change and therefore how to call it. The idiomatic way of handling this is using the Template Method design pattern. The second aspect is the order. In constructors, you want to ensure parent fields are initialized before child methods use them. In other cases it depends on the use case.

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i don't thing it's a code smell. C++ virtual destructors do this under the hood.

i find it useful when testing class hierarchies like:

class Base {}
class Derived extends Base {}
abstract class BaseTestClass {
    void setup() {}
    void teardown() {}
}
class DerivedTestCase extends BaseTestClass{
    void setUp() {
        super.setup();
        // setup more stuff for derived test
    }
    void teardown() {
        // teardown stuff for derived test
        super.teardown();
    }
}
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