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There has been a lot of talk related to Cassandra lately.

Twitter, Digg, Facebook, etc all use it.

When does it make sense to:

  • use Cassandra,
  • not use Cassandra, and
  • use a RDMS instead of Cassandra.
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Probably should be CW? This is pretty much just NoSQL vs Relational databases, which is pretty subjective IMO. –  Ed Woodcock Apr 14 '10 at 13:43
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I would like to know if is is suitable for messaging system. I assume if Twitter use it then it would be okay, however they might not use it for all of Twitter? –  Luke Apr 14 '10 at 13:45
    
techblog.bozho.net/?p=232 –  Bozho Sep 14 '10 at 20:28

9 Answers 9

The general idea of NoSQL is that you should use whichever data store is the best fit for your application. If you have a table of financial data, use SQL. If you have objects that would require complex/slow queries to map to a relational schema, use an object or key/value store.

Of course just about any real world problem you run into is somewhere in between those two extremes and neither solution will be perfect. You need to consider the capabilities of each store and the consequences of using one over the other, which will be very much specific to the problem you are trying to solve.

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The schema is unlikely to change, it fits well in a table structure, and lost/inconsistent data could cause real problems. –  Tom Clarkson Apr 27 '10 at 0:28
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I don't understand why inconsistent data can cause real problems with banks. Scenario:You have one bank account, with $100 on above the limit on it, and two bank cards. When you try to withdraw money with the two cards at the same time at 2 different ATMs, you will get 2 times $100, and a letter with an extra fee in your mail box. The bank earns money (the extra fee for being below the limit) by using inconsistent data. It's to hard to connect all ATMs in the world with each other through one large relational database. Can you give an example where inconsistent financial data can be a problem? –  Paco Apr 27 '10 at 16:00
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That stuff is all COBOL and batch processing, and not nearly as well designed/stable as you might think. ATMs do not connect to any sort of unified data store, so are hardly a suitable example. It's like saying SQL isn't suitable for web apps because you can't give everyone on the internet direct access to your database. Besides, I never said anything about banks - think things like orders on an ecommerce site where you don't have to deal with an organization so conservative that SQL is considered new and untrusted. –  Tom Clarkson Apr 28 '10 at 2:26
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So the only reason is conservatism, no technical reason? –  Paco Apr 28 '10 at 8:50
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@Paco: The point is, without proper transaction isolation, the normal bank won't even know the account has been overdrawn. They won't even know. –  Seun Osewa May 3 '10 at 21:40

When evaluating distributed data systems, you have to consider the CAP theorem - you can pick two of the following: consistency, availability, and partition tolerance.

Cassandra is an available, partition-tolerant system that supports eventual consistency. For more information see my Visual Guide to NoSQL Systems.

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When is the last time you saw a partition where both of the partitions were large? See my question stackoverflow.com/questions/7969874/… –  Aaron Watters Nov 3 '11 at 12:26
    
Cassandra also apparently lets you specify your consistency requirement at query time, which may be a useful compromise for some use cases –  Richard Marr Feb 11 at 14:06

Cassandra is the answer to a particular problem: What do you do when you have so much data that it does not fit on one server ? How do you store all your data on many servers and do not break your bank account and not make your developers insane ? Facebook gets 4 Terabyte of new compressed data EVERY DAY. And this number most likely will grow more than twice within a year.

If you do not have this much data or if you have millions to pay for Enterprise Oracle/DB2 cluster installation and specialists required to set it up and maintain it, then you are fine with SQL database.

However Facebook no longer uses cassandra and now uses MySQL almost exclusively moving the partitioning up in the application stack for faster performance and better control.

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Talking with someone in the midst of deploying Cassandra, it doesn't handle the many-to-many well. They are doing a hack job to do their initial testing. I spoke with a Cassandra consultant about this and he said he wouldn't recommend it if you had this problem set.

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another situation that makes the choice easier is when you want to use aggregate function like sum, min, max, etcetera and complex queries (like in the financial system mentioned above) then a relational database is probably more convenient then a nosql database since both are not possible on a nosql databse unless you use really a lot of Inverted indexes. When you do use nosql you would have to do the aggregate functions in code or store them seperatly in its own columnfamily but this makes it all quite complex and reduces the performance that you gained by using nosql.

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CouchdB, for one, allows computing aggregate functions very easily: wiki.apache.org/couchdb/…. Technically, this is "in code" but it's not nearly as "complex" to accomplish as it would be with Cassandra. –  user359996 Dec 2 '10 at 19:32
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Actually I agree that it may take you a day to write aggregate in code, but you can write it to run on a backend server which will use close to 0 cycles of the database. With an SQL database, you'll get the result writing one line which may take you 5 min. but it will slow down the whole database each time you run it. So there are pros and cons both ways. My bank, for example, closes all website accesses in the middle of the night for about 10 to 15 minutes. They most certainly are using COBOL, but that's a very similar problem. –  Alexis Wilke Jan 4 '13 at 1:43

Heavy single query vs. gazillion light query load is another point to consider, in addition to other answers here. It's inherently harder to automatically optimize a single query in a NoSql-style DB. I've used MongoDB and ran into performance issues when trying to calculate a complex query. I haven't used Cassandra but I expect it to have the same issue.

On the other hand, if your load is expected to be that of very many small queries, and you want to be able to easily scale out, you could take advantage of eventual consistency that is offered by most NoSql DBs. Note that eventual consistency is not really a feature of a non-relational data model, but it is much easier to implement and to set up in a NoSql-based system.

For a single, very heavy query, any modern RDBMS engine can do a decent job parallelizing parts of the query and take advantage of as much CPU and memory you throw at it (on a single machine). NoSql databases don't have enough information about the structure of the data to be able to make assumptions that will allow truly intelligent parallelization of a big query. They do allow you to easily scale out more servers (or cores) but once the query hits a complexity level you are basically forced to split it apart manually to parts that the NoSql engine knows how to deal with intelligently.

In my experience with MongoDB, in the end because of the complexity of the query there wasn't much Mongo could do to optimize it and run parts of it on multiple data. Mongo parallelizes multiple queries but isn't so good at optimizing a single one.

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Mongodb has very powerful aggregate functions and an expressive aggregate framework. It has many of the features developers are accustomed to using from the relational database world. It's document data/storage structure allows for more complex data models than Cassandra, for example.

All this comes with trade-offs of course. So when you select your database (NoSQL, NewSQL, or RDBMS) look at what problem you are trying to solve and at your scalability needs. No one database does it all.

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@Paco Sorry to burst your bubble but especially with financial data, transactional consistency is CRITICAL. As has been highlighted with databases such as Cassandra, a failed script may leave side effects, which may include one table updated and another not. One example: £100 is move from user 1's account to user 2's account. A transaction is recorded against each account, showing it removed from one and added to the other. Of course it depends on your design. In another scenario, a payment is made to the bank. The funds must be removed from one account and added to another. A lack of consistency would leave the potential for money to "go missing" from the system or be double-counted. Either way, the bank finds itself in trouble.

There are many such cases where transactional consistency is critical for business. Either it's handled by the app in a safe and effective manner, or the database must handle it completely itself, the latter being the "safe" option.

Lack of join support via cassandra limits it's usage too, unless suitable other apps are used with it. On that note, so do lacking trigger functions, foreign keys etc. It all ultimately comes down to what you require. If you're a search provider for example and have a huge customer base, Cassandra might be a perfect fit. For OLTP, and some reporting cases on the other hand, or smaller load volumes, it may be a complete mismatch against requirements.

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My company is currently using Cassandra to model financial data. It's not impossible to do but does require some creative modeling. The above example is not a problem though. There are many times where I have done a purchase but the transaction does not show up on my online banking immediately. The eventually consistent characteristic of Cassandra is sufficient for a lot of cases including many financial data scenarios. –  thattolleyguy Dec 9 '13 at 19:16

Let's read some real world cases:

http://planetcassandra.org/apache-cassandra-use-cases/

In this article: http://planetcassandra.org/blog/post/agentis-energy-stores-over-15-billion-records-of-time-series-usage-data-in-apache-cassandra

They elaborate the reason why they didn't choose MySql is because db synchronization is too slow.

Cassandra is like Amazon Dynamo and other High availability NoSQL database.

Features in stability, high availability. Backed-up performs as quickly as possible. Read and Write

better than HBase, which is also a BigTable clone. [wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Cassandra]

Conclusion is:

We looked at HBase, Dynamo, Mongo and Cassandra. 

Cassandra was simply the best storage solution for the majority of our data.
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