Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to have an 'updateinfo' table in order to record every update/insert/delete operations on another table.

In oracle I've written this:

CREATE TABLE updateinfo ( rnumber NUMBER(10), tablename VARCHAR2(100 BYTE), action VARCHAR2(100 BYTE), UPDATE_DATE date )

DROP TRIGGER TRI_TABLE;
CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER TRI_TABLE
AFTER DELETE OR INSERT OR UPDATE
ON demo
REFERENCING NEW AS NEW OLD AS OLD
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
if inserting then
insert into updateinfo(rnumber,tablename,action,update_date ) values(rownum,'demo', 'insert',sysdate);
elsif updating then
insert into updateinfo(rnumber,tablename,action,update_date ) values(rownum,'demo', 'update',sysdate);
elsif deleting then
insert into updateinfo(rnumber,tablename,action,update_date ) values(rownum,'demo', 'delete',sysdate);
end if;
-- EXCEPTION
-- WHEN OTHERS THEN
-- Consider logging the error and then re-raise
-- RAISE;
END TRI_TABLE;

but when checking updateinfo, all rnumber column is zero. is there anyway to retrieve the correct row number?

share|improve this question
    
The takeaway from this is that in the Relational model of data, there is no such thing as a "row number" - the concept simply is not applicable. – Jeffrey Kemp Apr 15 '10 at 13:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only option is to use primary key column of your "demo" table.

ROWNUM is not what you are looking for, read the explanation.

ROWID looks like a solution, but in fact it isn't, because it shouldn't be stored for a later use.

share|improve this answer

ROWNUM is not what you think it is. ROWNUM is a counter that has only a meaning within the context of one execution of a statement (i.e. the first resulting row always has rownum=1 etc.). I guess you are looking for ROWID, which identifies a row.

share|improve this answer
    
how can I use ROWID in the trigger then? – Freeman Apr 14 '10 at 7:27
    
ROWID does not identify a row. The unique identifier identifies a row. ROWID is a pointer to the physical location of a row a changes after and expdp impdp for instance. – Robert Merkwürdigeliebe Apr 14 '10 at 7:29
    
Robert: true, using the primary key of that table is prefereable to using ROWID – ammoQ Apr 14 '10 at 7:53
    
Freeman: As Robert said, it's best to use the primary key. To use rowid, you would have to change the data type of rnumber to varchar2 or rowid, then use "new.rowid" instead of rownum. But it's much better to use demo's primary key instead; if you use generated primary keys (usually an "id" column, populated from a sequence, or a "guid" column), use that datatype and put new.id resp. new.guid into rnumber. What you apparently plan to do is more complicated if you have concatenated primary keys for some tables. – ammoQ Apr 14 '10 at 8:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.