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I develop an application in which i process the image using its pixels but in that image processing it takes a lot of time. Therefore i want to crop UIImage (Only middle part of image i.e. removing/croping bordered part of image).I have the develop code are,

- (NSInteger) processImage1: (UIImage*) image
{

 CGFloat width = image.size.width;
 CGFloat height = image.size.height;
 struct pixel* pixels = (struct pixel*) calloc(1, image.size.width * image.size.height * sizeof(struct pixel));
 if (pixels != nil)
 {
  // Create a new bitmap
  CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(
              (void*) pixels,
              image.size.width,
              image.size.height,
              8,
              image.size.width * 4,
              CGImageGetColorSpace(image.CGImage),
              kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast
              );
  if (context != NULL)
  {
   // Draw the image in the bitmap
   CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, image.size.width, image.size.height), image.CGImage);
   NSUInteger numberOfPixels = image.size.width * image.size.height;

   NSMutableArray *numberOfPixelsArray = [[[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:numberOfPixelsArray] autorelease];
}

How i take(croping outside bordered) the middle part of UIImage?????????

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3 Answers 3

Try something like this:

CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([largeImage CGImage], cropRect);
image = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef]; 
CGImageRelease(imageRef);

Note: cropRect is smaller rectangle with middle part of the image...

share|improve this answer
    
mihirpmehta, now i trying to do something like that, - (UIImage *) cropedImage: (UIImage *) image { CGFloat width = image.size.width; CGFloat height = image.size.height; UIImage *cropedImage = [[UIImage alloc] init]; CGFloat widthCrop = (image.size.width)/2; CGFloat heightCrop = (image.size.height)/2; } Thereafter i can't visualize what to do? –  Rajendra Bhole Apr 14 '10 at 7:25
    
get new X and New Y as OldX + OldX/4 and OldY + OldY/4 and make REctangle with new width height NewX and NewY and use it as cropRect –  mihir mehta Apr 14 '10 at 8:02
    
@mihirpmehta, your above method is just drawing the mirror image of original image in the cropRect rectangle. It could not been processed the UIImage. –  Rajendra Bhole Apr 14 '10 at 16:59
    
sorry... change the XY coordinate to X+(Oldwidth/4) and y+(OldHeight/4)... my mistake.. –  mihir mehta Apr 15 '10 at 4:40
    
@mihirpmehta, I think i need to crop the image using pixel processing from your given co-ordinate.But how it does? –  Rajendra Bhole Apr 15 '10 at 8:16

I was looking for a way to get an arbitrary rectangular crop (ie., sub-image) of a UIImage.

Most of the solutions I tried do not work if the orientation of the image is anything but UIImageOrientationUp.

For example:

http://www.hive05.com/2008/11/crop-an-image-using-the-iphone-sdk/

Typically if you use your iPhone camera, you will have other orientations like UIImageOrientationLeft, and you will not get a correct crop with the above. This is because of the use of CGImageRef/CGContextDrawImage which differ in the coordinate system with respect to UIImage.

The code below uses UI* methods (no CGImageRef), and I have tested this with up/down/left/right oriented images, and it seems to work great.


// get sub image
- (UIImage*) getSubImageFrom: (UIImage*) img WithRect: (CGRect) rect {

    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(rect.size);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    // translated rectangle for drawing sub image 
    CGRect drawRect = CGRectMake(-rect.origin.x, -rect.origin.y, img.size.width, img.size.height);

    // clip to the bounds of the image context
    // not strictly necessary as it will get clipped anyway?
    CGContextClipToRect(context, CGRectMake(0, 0, rect.size.width, rect.size.height));

    // draw image
    [img drawInRect:drawRect];

    // grab image
    UIImage* subImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return subImage;
}

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1  
Just be aware that you can only run the above code on the main thread. The advantage of avoiding UIGraphicsBeginImageContext, etc is to get around this limitation. –  William Denniss Feb 2 '12 at 8:54
    
Thanks for this great solution! –  Lindemann Dec 9 '12 at 7:29
1  
@William Denniss are you sure? stackoverflow.com/questions/11528803/… –  Klaas Oct 18 '13 at 22:39
    
@Klass, you're right, since iOS 4 you can call it on any thread. However, the code is still not thread safe, you may only use UIGraphicsBeginImageContext on one thread at a time. The docs state: "Creates a bitmap-based graphics context and makes it the current context." I believe this "current context" is global, and thus not thread safe. My app processes multiple images at once, and I had crashes when using UIGraphicsBeginImageContext in multiple threads, so I switched to using CGContextRef's which are thread-safe. –  William Denniss Oct 19 '13 at 3:59

It would ultimately be faster, with a lot less image creation from sprite atlases, if you could set not only the image for a UIImageView, but also the top-left offset to display within that UIImage. Maybe this is possible. It would certainly eliminate a lot of effort!

Meanwhile, I created these useful functions in a utility class that I use in my apps. It creates a UIImage from part of another UIImage, with options to rotate, scale, and flip using standard UIImageOrientation values to specify. The pixel scaling is preserved from the original image.

My app creates a lot of UIImages during initialization, and this necessarily takes time. But some images aren't needed until a certain tab is selected. To give the appearance of quicker load I could create them in a separate thread spawned at startup, then just wait till it's done when that tab is selected.

This code is also posted at Most efficient way to draw part of an image in iOS

+ (UIImage*)imageByCropping:(UIImage *)imageToCrop toRect:(CGRect)aperture {
    return [ChordCalcController imageByCropping:imageToCrop toRect:aperture withOrientation:UIImageOrientationUp];
}

// Draw a full image into a crop-sized area and offset to produce a cropped, rotated image
+ (UIImage*)imageByCropping:(UIImage *)imageToCrop toRect:(CGRect)aperture withOrientation:(UIImageOrientation)orientation {

            // convert y coordinate to origin bottom-left
    CGFloat orgY = aperture.origin.y + aperture.size.height - imageToCrop.size.height,
            orgX = -aperture.origin.x,
            scaleX = 1.0,
            scaleY = 1.0,
            rot = 0.0;
    CGSize size;

    switch (orientation) {
        case UIImageOrientationRight:
        case UIImageOrientationRightMirrored:
        case UIImageOrientationLeft:
        case UIImageOrientationLeftMirrored:
            size = CGSizeMake(aperture.size.height, aperture.size.width);
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationDown:
        case UIImageOrientationDownMirrored:
        case UIImageOrientationUp:
        case UIImageOrientationUpMirrored:
            size = aperture.size;
            break;
        default:
            assert(NO);
            return nil;
    }


    switch (orientation) {
        case UIImageOrientationRight:
            rot = 1.0 * M_PI / 2.0;
            orgY -= aperture.size.height;
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationRightMirrored:
            rot = 1.0 * M_PI / 2.0;
            scaleY = -1.0;
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationDown:
            scaleX = scaleY = -1.0;
            orgX -= aperture.size.width;
            orgY -= aperture.size.height;
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationDownMirrored:
            orgY -= aperture.size.height;
            scaleY = -1.0;
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationLeft:
            rot = 3.0 * M_PI / 2.0;
            orgX -= aperture.size.height;
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationLeftMirrored:
            rot = 3.0 * M_PI / 2.0;
            orgY -= aperture.size.height;
            orgX -= aperture.size.width;
            scaleY = -1.0;
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationUp:
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationUpMirrored:
            orgX -= aperture.size.width;
            scaleX = -1.0;
            break;
    }

    // set the draw rect to pan the image to the right spot
    CGRect drawRect = CGRectMake(orgX, orgY, imageToCrop.size.width, imageToCrop.size.height);

    // create a context for the new image
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(size, NO, imageToCrop.scale);
    CGContextRef gc = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    // apply rotation and scaling
    CGContextRotateCTM(gc, rot);
    CGContextScaleCTM(gc, scaleX, scaleY);

    // draw the image to our clipped context using the offset rect
    CGContextDrawImage(gc, drawRect, imageToCrop.CGImage);

    // pull the image from our cropped context
    UIImage *cropped = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    // pop the context to get back to the default
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    // Note: this is autoreleased
    return cropped;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. What should be the Orientation that I send for the image if I took it from AVFoundation camera which rotates the images? –  Dejel Feb 3 '13 at 15:25

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