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I have 2 nested divs, both have

#x{
width:400px;
height:400px;
background-color:#fff;
color:#000
}

#y{
width:200px;
height:200px;
background-color:#000;
color:#ccc;
}


<div id="y"><div id="x">Here lies a x value</div></div>

I want the #x and #y to have individual css properties, but that is not the case, #x overrides the #y values

Any help appreciated.

Thanks Jean

share|improve this question
    
You have two #y classes. Is that what you intended? –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 14 '10 at 7:58
    
sorry done editing that was #x and #y –  X10nD Apr 14 '10 at 7:59
    
Your nested div is wider than the parent. –  Kyle Apr 14 '10 at 8:03
    
@kyle yes, I need to have 2 boxes, each with diff styles –  X10nD Apr 14 '10 at 8:05
1  
Your width declarations miss the dimension: width:200px would do a better job. –  Boldewyn Apr 14 '10 at 8:10

3 Answers 3

They do have individual properties. It is just that the nested x div is in front of the y div, so the y div is obscured. Try adding overflow: hidden; to #y and you will see that it constrains #x to it's footprint.

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@kingjeffrey not working –  X10nD Apr 14 '10 at 8:35
    
The white div background blends in with the white page background. Try applying a border to #x to see its bounds. Or change the page background to yellow. You could also apply a top and left margin to #x to see some of #y exposed. Here is a sample: test.kingdesk.com/nested-widths.html As you will see, #y maintains it's styling (behind #x) –  kingjeffrey Apr 14 '10 at 8:45
#y{
width:400px;<-- add px.
height:400px;
background-color:#fff;
color:#000
}

#x{ <--changed to X, it was y
width:200px;
height:200px;
background-color:#000;
color:#ccc;
}

Also, when you id a div to x it will take the properties you detup in #x.

share|improve this answer
    
I know it will take the properties of #x, but I want the divs to have individual properties, is that possible? –  X10nD Apr 14 '10 at 8:07
    
Yes, just set it up in the CSS, that's what it's for. You have it right, if you want to have more different styles, eg border then tell #x or #y to have a border and it will, but the other won't. You need to tell nested divs each and every different thing you want, or as far as I know it will inherit from its parent on most properties. –  Kyle Apr 14 '10 at 8:11

Specificity! As your two declarations have the same specificity, the one that comes last in the CSS is the one that is honoured. To increase the specificity of the inner target, try:

#y #x{
width:400;
height:400px;
background-color:#fff;
color:#000
}

#y{
width:200;
height:200px;
background-color:#000;
color:#ccc;
}

Here's a cracking article on the subject.

share|improve this answer
    
I doubt that specifity has to do anything with it. The declaration for one div with ID x is never applied to another div with ID y (not counting the case of inheritance, as is the case with the color property, but the question IMHO is targeted to the dimensions) –  Boldewyn Apr 14 '10 at 8:12
    
@Boldewyn you are so right. I'll get my coat. –  graphicdivine Apr 14 '10 at 8:25
    
its not targeted to border or dimensions, but color also. Assume I have opacity in #y and my div setting is as <div id=y><div id=x></div></div>. But I dont want a opacity change in #x –  X10nD Apr 14 '10 at 8:37
    
@Jean: In that case, follow either graphicdivine's approach or change the order of the CSS declarations. Latter ones overwrite earlier ones with the same specifity. –  Boldewyn Apr 14 '10 at 10:31
    
The -1 is new, isn't it? I wonder why, since the answer at least explains, why the color is different. –  Boldewyn Apr 15 '10 at 11:21

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