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While writing some recent scripts in cmd.exe, I had a need to use findstr with regular expressions - customer required standard cmd.exe commands (no GnuWin32 nor Cygwin nor VBS nor Powershell).

I just wanted to know if a variable contained any upper-case characters and attempted to use:

> set myvar=abc
> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "[A-Z]"
abc
> echo %errorlevel%
0

When %myvar% is set to abc, that actually outputs the string and sets errorlevel to 0, saying that a match was found.

However, the full-list variant:

> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "[ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ]"
> echo %errorlevel%
1

does not output the line and it correctly sets errorlevel to 1.

In addition:

> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "^[A-Z]*$"
> echo %errorlevel%
1

also works as expected.

I'm obviously missing something here even if it's only the fact that findstr is somehow broken.

Why does the first (range) regex not work in this case?


And yet more weirdness:

> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "[A-Z]"
abc
> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "[A-Z][A-Z]"
abc
> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "[A-Z][A-Z][A-Z]"
> echo %myvar%|findstr /r "[A]"

The last two above also does not output the string!!

share|improve this question
    
well findstr's help shows that /I switch sets case-insensitive mode, but I can't get findstr to be case-sensitive no matter what I do using the range, too! –  Axarydax Apr 14 '10 at 8:05
    
after my initial false start, I can only second (or is it third) both observations. You already have given the workaround for what appears to be a bug in findstr... use the full-list variant. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Apr 14 '10 at 8:54
    
just a note: echo %myvar%|findstr /r "^[A-Z]*$" is actually not working, there is whitespace after abc , if you change "^[A-Z]*$" to "^[A-Z]* $", it will still output abc as in "[A-Z]", and error level is 0 –  YOU Apr 14 '10 at 10:12
    
Actually that may be another bug, @S.Mark, the pattern "^ [A-Z]*$ (with lots of leading spaces) gives the same results and, if you capture the output to a file, there are no spaces. –  paxdiablo Apr 14 '10 at 11:19
    
I have just encountered this problem; thanks for the solution (workaround). Here's another little bit of extra information though: [a-z] also finds the accented characters (in an ANSI encoded file, not Unicode). So it looks like this bug might arise from code trying to support decorated characters. –  Rhubbarb May 1 '11 at 0:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I believe this is mostly a horrible design flaw.

We all expect the ranges to collate based on the ASCII code value. But they don't - instead the ranges are based on a collation sequence that nearly matches the default sequence used by SORT. EDIT -The exact collation sequence used by FINDSTR is now available at the bottom of this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/8844873/1012053.

I prepared a text file containing one line for each extended ASCII character from 1 - 255, excluding 10 (LF), 13 (CR), and 26 (EOF on Windows). On each line I have the character, followed by a space, followed by the decimal code for the character. I then ran the file through SORT and captured the output in a sortedChars.txt file.

I now can easily test any regex range against this sorted file and demonstrate how the range is determined by a collation sequence that is nearly the same as SORT.

>findstr /nrc:"^[0-9]" sortedChars.txt
137:0 048
138:½ 171
139:¼ 172
140:1 049
141:2 050
142:² 253
143:3 051
144:4 052
145:5 053
146:6 054
147:7 055
148:8 056
149:9 057

The results are not quite what we expected in that chars 171, 172 and 253 are thrown in the mix. But the results make perfect sense. The line number prefix corresponds to the SORT collation sequence, and you can see that the range exactly matches according to the SORT sequence.

Here is another range test that exactly follows the SORT sequence:

>findstr /nrc:"^[!-=]" sortedChars.txt
34:! 033
35:" 034
36:# 035
37:$ 036
38:% 037
39:& 038
40:( 040
41:) 041
42:* 042
43:, 044
44:. 046
45:/ 047
46:: 058
47:; 059
48:? 063
49:@ 064
50:[ 091
51:\ 092
52:] 093
53:^ 094
54:_ 095
55:` 096
56:{ 123
57:| 124
58:} 125
59:~ 126
60:¡ 173
61:¿ 168
62:¢ 155
63:£ 156
64:¥ 157
65:₧ 158
66:+ 043
67:∙ 249
68:< 060
69:= 061

There is one small anomaly with alpha characters. Character "a" sorts between "A" and "Z" yet it does not match [A-Z]. "z" sorts after "Z", yet it matches [A-Z]. There is a corresponding problem with [a-z]. "A" sorts before "a", yet it matches [a-z]. "Z" sorts between "a" and "z", yet it does not match [a-z].

Here are the [A-Z] results:

>findstr /nrc:"^[A-Z]" sortedChars.txt
151:A 065
153:â 131
154:ä 132
155:à 133
156:å 134
157:Ä 142
158:Å 143
159:á 160
160:ª 166
161:æ 145
162:Æ 146
163:B 066
164:b 098
165:C 067
166:c 099
167:Ç 128
168:ç 135
169:D 068
170:d 100
171:E 069
172:e 101
173:é 130
174:ê 136
175:ë 137
176:è 138
177:É 144
178:F 070
179:f 102
180:ƒ 159
181:G 071
182:g 103
183:H 072
184:h 104
185:I 073
186:i 105
187:ï 139
188:î 140
189:ì 141
190:í 161
191:J 074
192:j 106
193:K 075
194:k 107
195:L 076
196:l 108
197:M 077
198:m 109
199:N 078
200:n 110
201:ñ 164
202:Ñ 165
203:ⁿ 252
204:O 079
205:o 111
206:ô 147
207:ö 148
208:ò 149
209:Ö 153
210:ó 162
211:º 167
212:P 080
213:p 112
214:Q 081
215:q 113
216:R 082
217:r 114
218:S 083
219:s 115
220:ß 225
221:T 084
222:t 116
223:U 085
224:u 117
225:û 150
226:ù 151
227:ú 163
228:ü 129
229:Ü 154
230:V 086
231:v 118
232:W 087
233:w 119
234:X 088
235:x 120
236:Y 089
237:y 121
238:ÿ 152
239:Z 090
240:z 122

And the [a-z] results

>findstr /nrc:"^[a-z]" sortedChars.txt
151:A 065
152:a 097
153:â 131
154:ä 132
155:à 133
156:å 134
157:Ä 142
158:Å 143
159:á 160
160:ª 166
161:æ 145
162:Æ 146
163:B 066
164:b 098
165:C 067
166:c 099
167:Ç 128
168:ç 135
169:D 068
170:d 100
171:E 069
172:e 101
173:é 130
174:ê 136
175:ë 137
176:è 138
177:É 144
178:F 070
179:f 102
180:ƒ 159
181:G 071
182:g 103
183:H 072
184:h 104
185:I 073
186:i 105
187:ï 139
188:î 140
189:ì 141
190:í 161
191:J 074
192:j 106
193:K 075
194:k 107
195:L 076
196:l 108
197:M 077
198:m 109
199:N 078
200:n 110
201:ñ 164
202:Ñ 165
203:ⁿ 252
204:O 079
205:o 111
206:ô 147
207:ö 148
208:ò 149
209:Ö 153
210:ó 162
211:º 167
212:P 080
213:p 112
214:Q 081
215:q 113
216:R 082
217:r 114
218:S 083
219:s 115
220:ß 225
221:T 084
222:t 116
223:U 085
224:u 117
225:û 150
226:ù 151
227:ú 163
228:ü 129
229:Ü 154
230:V 086
231:v 118
232:W 087
233:w 119
234:X 088
235:x 120
236:Y 089
237:y 121
238:ÿ 152
240:z 122

Sort sorts upper case before lower case. (EDIT - I just read the help for SORT and learned that it does not differentiate between upper and lower case. The fact that my SORT output consistently put upper before lower is probably a result of the order of the input.) But regex apparently sorts lower case before upper case. All of the following ranges fail to match any characters.

>findstr /nrc:"^[A-a]" sortedChars.txt

>findstr /nrc:"^[B-b]" sortedChars.txt

>findstr /nrc:"^[C-c]" sortedChars.txt

>findstr /nrc:"^[D-d]" sortedChars.txt

Reversing the order finds the characters.

>findstr /nrc:"^[a-A]" sortedChars.txt
151:A 065
152:a 097

>findstr /nrc:"^[b-B]" sortedChars.txt
163:B 066
164:b 098

>findstr /nrc:"^[c-C]" sortedChars.txt
165:C 067
166:c 099

>findstr /nrc:"^[d-D]" sortedChars.txt
169:D 068
170:d 100

There are additional characters that regex sorts differently than SORT, but I haven't got a precise list.

share|improve this answer
    
Since the community now values your answer higher than mine (and, let's face it, it's a better answer as well with more of an explanation of why this happens), I've decided to change the accepted answer to this one. –  paxdiablo Jan 14 '12 at 1:23

This appears to be caused by the use of ranges within regular expression searches.

It doesn't occur for the first character in the range. It doesn't occur at all for non-ranges.

> echo a | findstr /r "[A-C]"
> echo b | findstr /r "[A-C]"
    b
> echo c | findstr /r "[A-C]"
    c
> echo d | findstr /r "[A-C]"
> echo b | findstr /r "[B-C]"
> echo c | findstr /r "[B-C]"
    c

> echo a | findstr /r "[ABC]"
> echo b | findstr /r "[ABC]"
> echo c | findstr /r "[ABC]"
> echo d | findstr /r "[ABC]"
> echo b | findstr /r "[BC]"
> echo c | findstr /r "[BC]"

> echo A | findstr /r "[A-C]"
    A
> echo B | findstr /r "[A-C]"
    B
> echo C | findstr /r "[A-C]"
    C
> echo D | findstr /r "[A-C]"

According to the SS64 CMD FINDSTR page (which, in a stunning display of circularity, references this question), the range [A-Z]:

... includes the complete English alphabet, both upper and lower case (except for "a"), as well as non-English alpha characters with diacriticals.

To get around the problem in my environment, I simply used specific regular expressions (such as [ABCD] rather than [A-D]). A more sensible approach for those that are allowed would be to download CygWin or GnuWin32 and use grep from one of those packages.

share|improve this answer

Everyone above is wrong. The alpha chars order is the follwoing: aAbBcCdDeE..zZ so echo a | findstr /r "[A-Z]" returns nothing, since a is outside of that range.

echo abc|findstr /r "[A-Z][A-Z][A-Z]" also returns nothing, since first range group matches b, second one matches c and the third one matches nothing and thus the whole regex pattern finds nothing.

If you like to match any character of latin alphabet - use [a-Z].

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