Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone please explain to me what is the difference between IEnumerable & IEnumerator , and how to use them?

Thanks!!!

share|improve this question
    
On what language / platform ? –  Henk Holterman Apr 14 '10 at 8:12
    
That'll be .NET - have retagged. –  David M Apr 14 '10 at 8:15
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Generally, an IEnumerable is an object which can be enumerated, such as a list or array. An IEnumerator is an object that stores the state of the enumeration.

The reason they're not one and the same is that you could have multiple enumerations over the same object at the same time - even in a single-threaded application. For example, consider the following code:

foreach (x in mylist)
{
    foreach (y in mylist)
    {
        if (x.Value == y.Value && x != y)
        {
            // Found a duplicate value
        }
    }
}

This would work fine if mylist is a proper implementation of IEnumerable, but it would fail if mylist returned itself as the enumerator.

share|improve this answer
    
I think an sample implementation of IEnumerator would help the OP. It's much clearer once you see how those two play along.. –  Tigraine Apr 14 '10 at 8:50
add comment

The IEnumerable interface defines a class which can be enumerated over, i.e. it contains elements which can be accessed through enumeration.

The IEnumerator interfaces defines a class which can perform enumeration over a sequence of elements.

The distinction is that IEnumerable means "you can enumerate me", where IEnumerator performs the task of enumeration.

To elaborate a little more, IEnumerable exposes a method GetEnumerator. This method returns an IEnumerator you can then use to perform the enumerating. Normally you don't deal with this method yourself, because the foreach keyword handles it for you.

foreach(int element in myList)
{
    // Do some work...
}

This code is actually expanded for you by the compiler into this:

IEnumerator enumerator = myList.GetEnumerator();
try 
{
   while (enumerator.MoveNext()) 
   {
      int element = (int)enumerator.Current;
      // Do some work...
   }
}
finally 
{
   IDisposable disposable = enumerator as System.IDisposable;
   if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose();
}

As you can see, an IEnumerator is used here to perform the enumeration through the elements.

share|improve this answer
add comment

An IEnumerable is something that can be enumerated. An IEnumerator is the means to do that enumeration. So IEnumerable defines just one method - GetEnumerator, which returns an instance of IEnumerator to do the actual legwork...

share|improve this answer
add comment

IEnumerable defines an object which contains an aggregation of objects, which can be enumerated.

IEnumerator is the object which allows the aggregation to be enumerated, and stores the state of the enumeration.

share|improve this answer
add comment

IEnumerable means something that can be enumerated, IEnumerator is something that enumerates it.

Simplifying it to a simple for-loop:

for (int i=0; i<10;i++)
{
   count+=myarray[i];
}

In the example above, i would be IEnumerator, and myarray would be IEnumerable.

share|improve this answer
    
That is not correct - i is simply an int, it does not implement IEnumerator. –  EMP Apr 14 '10 at 8:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.