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I need just dictionary or associative array string => int.

There is type map C++ for this case.

But I need only one map forall instances(-> static) and this map can't be changed(-> const);

I have found this way with boost library

 std::map<int, char> example = 
      boost::assign::map_list_of(1, 'a') (2, 'b') (3, 'c');

Is there other solution without this lib? I have tried something like this, but there are always some issues with map initialization.

class myClass{
private:
    static map<int,int> create_map()
        {
          map<int,int> m;
          m[1] = 2;
          m[3] = 4;
          m[5] = 6;
          return m;
        }
    static map<int,int> myMap =  create_map();

};
share|improve this question
1  
What are the issues you refer to? Are you trying to use this map from another global static variable/constant? –  Péter Török Apr 14 '10 at 9:45
    
That's not an associative array string => int, you're mapping an int to a char. v = k + 'a' - 1. –  Johnsyweb May 28 '10 at 0:22

9 Answers 9

up vote 62 down vote accepted
#include <map>
using namespace std;

struct A{
    static map<int,int> create_map()
        {
          map<int,int> m;
          m[1] = 2;
          m[3] = 4;
          m[5] = 6;
          return m;
        }
    static const map<int,int> myMap;

};

const map<int,int> A:: myMap =  A::create_map();

int main() {
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for simplicity, of course using a Boost.Assign like design is pretty neat too :) –  Matthieu M. Apr 14 '10 at 11:33
3  
+1, thanks. Note: I had to put the initialization line in my implementation file; leaving it in the header file gave me errors due to multiple definitions (initialization code would run whenever header was included somewhere). –  System.Cats.Lol Dec 3 '12 at 19:00
    
With g++ v4.7.3, this compiles, until I add cout << A::myMap[1]; into main(). It gives an error. The error doesn't occur if I remove the const qualifiers, so I guess map's operator[] can't handle a const map, at least, not in the g++ implementation of the C++ library. –  Craig McQueen Oct 31 '13 at 1:08
1  
Error is: const_map.cpp:22:23: error: passing ‘const std::map<int, int>’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘std::map<_Key, _Tp, _Compare, _Alloc>::mapped_type& std::map<_Key, _Tp, _Compare, _Alloc>::operator[](const key_type&) [with _Key = int; _Tp = int; _Compare = std::less<int>; _Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const int, int> >; std::map<_Key, _Tp, _Compare, _Alloc>::mapped_type = int; std::map<_Key, _Tp, _Compare, _Alloc>::key_type = int]’ discards qualifiers [-fpermissive] –  Craig McQueen Oct 31 '13 at 1:09
1  
Indeed, the map's operator[] can't operate on a const map because that operator creates the referenced entry if it doesn't exist (since it returns a reference to the mapped value). C++11 introduced the at(KeyValT key) method that lets you access the item with a given key, throwing an exception if it doesn't exist. (en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/map/at) This method will work on const instances but cannot be used to insert an element on an non-const instance (as does the [] operator). –  mbargiel Feb 13 at 17:01

The C++11 standard introduced uniform initialization which makes this much simpler if your compiler supports it:

//myClass.hpp
class myClass {
  private:
    static map<int,int> myMap;
};


//myClass.cpp
map<int,int> myClass::myMap = {
   {1, 2},
   {3, 4},
   {5, 6}
};

See also this section from Professional C++, on unordered_maps.

share|improve this answer

If you find boost::assign::map_list_of useful, but can't use it for some reason, you could write your own:

template<class K, class V>
struct map_list_of_type {
  typedef std::map<K, V> Map;
  Map data;
  map_list_of_type(K k, V v) { data[k] = v; }
  map_list_of_type& operator()(K k, V v) { data[k] = v; return *this; }
  operator Map const&() const { return data; }
};
template<class K, class V>
map_list_of_type<K, V> my_map_list_of(K k, V v) {
  return map_list_of_type<K, V>(k, v);
}

int main() {
  std::map<int, char> example = 
    my_map_list_of(1, 'a') (2, 'b') (3, 'c');
  cout << example << '\n';
}

It's useful to know how such things work, especially when they're so short, but in this case I'd use a function:

a.hpp

struct A {
  static map<int, int> const m;
};

a.cpp

namespace {
map<int,int> create_map() {
  map<int, int> m;
  m[1] = 2; // etc.
  return m;
}
}

map<int, int> const A::m = create_map();
share|improve this answer

I did it! :)

Works fine without C++11

class MyClass {
    typedef std::map<std::string, int> MyMap;

    struct T {
        const char* Name;
        int Num;

        operator MyMap::value_type() const {
            return std::pair<std::string, int>(Name, Num);
        }
    };

    static const T MapPairs[];
    static const MyMap TheMap;
};

const MyClass::T MyClass::MapPairs[] = {
    { "Jan", 1 }, { "Feb", 2 }, { "Mar", 3 }
};

const MyClass::MyMap MyClass::TheMap(MapPairs, MapPairs + 3);
share|improve this answer

If the map is to contain only entries that are known at compile time and the keys to the map are integers, then you do not need to use a map at all.

char get_value(int key)
{
    switch (key)
    {
        case 1:
            return 'a';
        case 2:
            return 'b';
        case 3:
            return 'c';
        default:
            // Do whatever is appropriate when the key is not valid
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for pointing out that a map is not needed, however, you can't iterate over this –  Viktor Sehr Apr 14 '10 at 11:19
1  
That switch is awful, though. Why not return key + 'a' - 1? –  Johnsyweb May 28 '10 at 0:19
6  
@Johnsyweb. I assume that the mapping supplied by the original poster was presented solely as an example and not indicative of the actual mapping that he has. Therefore, I would also assume that return key + 'a' - 1 would not work for his actual mapping. –  Matthew T. Staebler Jun 7 '10 at 15:21

A different approach to the problem:

struct A {
    static const map<int, string> * singleton_map() {
        static map<int, string>* m = NULL;
        if (!m) {
            m = new map<int, string>;
            m[42] = "42"
            // ... other initializations
        }
        return m;
    }

    // rest of the class
}

This is more efficient, as there is no one-type copy from stack to heap (including constructor, destructors on all elements). Whether this matters or not depends on your use case. Does not matter with strings! (but you may or may not find this version "cleaner")

share|improve this answer
3  
RVO eliminates the copying in mine and Neil's answer. –  Roger Pate Sep 9 '10 at 10:41

If you are using a compiler which still doesn't support universal initialization or you have reservation in using Boost, another possible alternative would be as follows

std::map<int, int> m = [] () {
    std::pair<int,int> _m[] = {
        std::make_pair(1 , sizeof(2)),
        std::make_pair(3 , sizeof(4)),
        std::make_pair(5 , sizeof(6))};
    std::map<int, int> m;
    for (auto data: _m)
    {
        m[data.first] = data.second;
    }
    return m;
}();
share|improve this answer

A function call cannot appear in a constant expression.

try this: (just an example)

#include <map>
#include <iostream>

using std::map;
using std::cout;

class myClass{
 public:
 static map<int,int> create_map()
    {
      map<int,int> m;
      m[1] = 2;
      m[3] = 4;
      m[5] = 6;
      return m;
    }
 const static map<int,int> myMap;

};
const map<int,int>myClass::myMap =  create_map();

int main(){

   map<int,int> t=myClass::create_map();
   std::cout<<t[1]; //prints 2
}
share|improve this answer
5  
A function can certainly be used to initialise a const object. –  anon Apr 14 '10 at 9:52
    
In OP's code static map<int,int> myMap = create_map(); is incorrect. –  Prasoon Saurav Apr 14 '10 at 9:54
3  
The code in the question is wrong, we all agree to that, but it has nothing to do with 'constant expressions' as you say in this answer, but rather with the fact that you can only initialize constant static members of a class in the declaration if they are of integer or enum type. For all other types, the initialization must be done in the member definition and not the declaration. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 14 '10 at 10:07
    
Neil's answer compiles with g++. Still, I remember having some problems with this approach in earlier versions of GNU toolchain. Is there an universal right answer? –  Basilevs Apr 14 '10 at 10:07
1  
@Prasoon: I don't know what the compiler says, but the error in the question code is initializing a constant member attribute of class type in the class declaration, regardless of whether the initialization is a constant expression or not. If you define a class: struct testdata { testdata(int){} }; struct test { static const testdata td = 5; }; testdata test::td; it will fail to compile even if the initialization is performed with a constant expression (5). That is, 'constant expression' is irrelevant to the correctness (or lack of it) of the initial code. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 14 '10 at 12:05

I often use this pattern and recommend you to use it as well:

class MyMap : public std::map<int, int>
{
public:
    MyMap()
    {
        //either
        insert(make_pair(1, 2));
        insert(make_pair(3, 4));
        insert(make_pair(5, 6));
        //or
        (*this)[1] = 2;
        (*this)[3] = 4;
        (*this)[5] = 6;
    }
} const static my_map;

Sure it is not very readable, but without other libs it is best we can do. Also there won't be any redundant operations like copying from one map to another like in your attempt.

This is even more useful inside of functions: Instead of:

void foo()
{
   static bool initComplete = false;
   static Map map;
   if (!initComplete)
   {
      initComplete = true;
      map= ...;
   }
}

Use the following:

void bar()
{
    struct MyMap : Map
    {
      MyMap()
      {
         ...
      }
    } static mymap;
}

Not only you don't need here to deal with boolean variable anymore, you won't have hidden global variable that is checked if initializer of static variable inside function was already called.

share|improve this answer
5  
Inheritance should be the tool of last resort, not the first. –  anon Apr 14 '10 at 10:44
    
A compiler that supports RVO eliminates redundant copying with the function versions. C++0x move semantics eliminate the rest, once they're available. In any case, I doubt it's close to being a bottleneck. –  Roger Pate Apr 14 '10 at 10:56
    
Roger, I'm well aware of RVO, && and move semantics. This is a solution for now in minimal amount of code and entities. Plus all C++0x features won't help with static object inside function example as we are not allowed to define functions inside of functions. –  Pavel Chikulaev Apr 14 '10 at 11:07

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