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Consider this Python snippet:

for a in range(10):

    if a == 7:
        pass
    if a == 8:
        pass
    if a == 9:
        pass
    else:
        print "yes"

How can it be written shorter?

#Like this or...
if a ?????[7,8,9]:
    pass
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4  
pass does nothing, therefore I would negate the expression: if a not in (7,8,9): print "yes" –  Georg Schölly Apr 14 '10 at 10:59

8 Answers 8

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Use the in operator:

if a in (7,8,9):
    pass
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1  
a tuple is prefered as a list obejct –  dzen Apr 14 '10 at 10:44
2  
@dzen: Depends who you talk to. It's stylistic and being consistent is more important than what you choose, in this case. –  Roger Pate Apr 14 '10 at 10:49
    
Tuples are usually preferred in such situations because they are faster and more efficient. –  jcao219 Jul 7 '10 at 0:58

To test if a falls within a range:

if 7 <= a <= 9:
  pass

To test if a is in a given sequence:

if a in [3, 5, 42]:
  pass
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1  
The first variant is better, at least for this case! –  Andrei Ciobanu Apr 23 '10 at 13:39
for a in range(10):
    if a > 6:
        continue
    print('yes')
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Based on your original code the direct "pythonic" replacement is:

if not a in [7, 8, 9]:
     print 'yes'

or

if a not in [7, 8, 9]:
     print 'yes'

The latter reads a little better, so I guess it's a bit more "pythonic".

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if a in [7,8,9]
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Depending on what you want to do, the map() function can also be interesting:

def _print(x):
    print 'yes'

map(_print, [a for a in range(10) if a not in (7,8,9)])
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What about using lambda.

>>> f = lambda x: x not in (7, 8, 9) and print('yes')
>>> f(3)
yes
>>> f(7)
False
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2  
Use of the short circuit property of and seems to be discouraged. See one of Mike Graham's answers on stackoverflow for the reasons. –  blokeley Apr 14 '10 at 12:25
    
Just because you can use a lambda doesn't mean you should. –  Fred Nurk Feb 21 '11 at 2:35

Since the question is tagged as beginner, I'm going to add some basic if-statement advice:

if a == 7:
    pass
if a == 8:
    pass
if a == 9:
   ...
else:
   ...

are three independent if statements and the first two have no effect, the else refers only to

 if a == 9:

so if a is 7 or 8, the program prints "yes". For future use of if-else statement like this, make sure to use elif:

if a == 7:
    seven()
elif a == 8:
    eight()
elif a == 9:
    nine()
else:
    print "yes"

or use just one if-statement if they call for the same action:

if a == 7 or a == 8 or a == 9:
    seven_eight_or_nine()
else:
    print "yes"
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