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how do i acces the property value from an internal class , see below?

namespace N1
{
    public class ClassA
    {
       string var1 = null;
       private ClassB  b;
       public ClassA()
       {
          var1 = "one";
          b = new ClassB();
       }
       //property 
       public string Var1
       {
          get{ return var1; }
       }
}

namespace N1
{
   internal class ClassB  
   {
     private void method()
     {
      // I need to access the value of Var1( property) from here, how to do this?
     }
   }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need a reference to an instance of Class A.

So either change Class B constructor to accept a reference to class A

namespace N1
{
    public class ClassA
    {
        string var1 = null;
        private ClassB b;
        public ClassA()
        {
            var1 = "one";
            b = new ClassB(this);
        }
        //property 
        public string Var1
        {
            get { return var1; }
        }
    }
}

namespace N1
{
   internal class ClassB  
   {
       ClassA classA;
       public ClassB(ClassA classARef)
       {
           classA = classARef;
       }

     private void method()
     {
      // I need to access the value of Var1( property) from here, how to do this?
         string myString = classA.Var1;
     }
   }
}

or make ClassB's private method() take in a string? private void method(string classAVar1)

or make ClassA static (haha)

share|improve this answer

Pass an instance of ClassA into ClassB's constructor:

namespace N1
{
   internal class ClassB  
   {
     private ClassA _classAInstance;

     public void ClassB(ClassA classAInstance)
     {
         _classAInstance = classAInstance;
     }

     private void method()
     {
       // You can access _classAInstance properties here
     }

   }
}

Update: I missed that a ClassB instance b was a private member on ClassA. Using my previous answer, you can just instantiate b in ClassA's constructor:

   public ClassA()
   {
      var1 = "one";
      b = new ClassB(this);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
If its to access the value of 1 property I would probably advise against taking in the full class. – James Apr 14 '10 at 11:36
    
@Jamie: I was thinking in the lines of instantiating the class inside the method. Cool implementation. – Raja Apr 14 '10 at 11:36
    
@James -- That works too but doesn't provide a context. You could pass any string into the constructor; my answer limits ClassB's access to ClassA's properties and methods. – Jamie Ide Apr 14 '10 at 11:46
    
@Jamie: Valid point, however, ClassB is an internal field of ClassA so it can only really be allowed to input data from that class anyway (in this particular example). – James Apr 14 '10 at 11:59
    
@James -- That's not correct; internal means the class is accessible to all other files in the same assembly. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7c5ka91b%28VS.80%29.aspx – Jamie Ide Apr 14 '10 at 12:14

Well there are a couple of ways:

  1. Change the access modifier of ClassB.Method to be public and make it take a string parameter.
  2. Update the constructor of ClassB to take a string parameter and store it in a private field.
  3. Add a public string property to ClassB.

Making a class internal just means the class is only available with files inside the same assembly.

share|improve this answer
    
My Idea of making class B internal is that the client tht uses assebmbly Should only access the properties and methods of Class A. Client should not be allowed to access anything in Class B – myWorld May 21 '10 at 9:42
    
@starz26: To make ClassB only accessible to ClassA internally, make it a private class in ClassA. To make it accessible to any other classes in the assembly, but not accessible outside it just mark it as internal. – James May 21 '10 at 10:11

You can't. Change access modifiers of either class A or B. Purpose of internal class is to contain some internal logic implementation, and if you have need to access public classes' fields from it, probabli something wrong with app design

share|improve this answer
    
I think comments on down-votes must be made mandatory - but I digress. I did not down-vote though but I am wondering if you meant nested classes – Asher Apr 14 '10 at 11:43

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