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I asked a question [here] recently and it's just not providing me with an answer. Here's what I want to do and you can see my first attempt at the link above:

  1. User submits form
  2. Stop default submit action
  3. check to see if a similar entry exists in database
    1. If it does, display a notice asking them if they want to submit anyway and give an option to let them submit anyway (enable default action and submit it).
    2. If it does not, enable the default action on the form and let it submit

I'm at a loss. Any help is appreciated. Thanks gang.

EDIT for Simeon: Here is the code I'm using with your solution:

var forceSubmitForm = false;
$('#purchaser_contact').submit(function(){

  if(forceSubmitForm) return true;

  if( $("#id").val()=="" ){

    if( $("#fname").val()=='' || $("#city").val()=='' ){ alert('First Name and City are required fields. Please fill these in before continuing.'); return false; }

      $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: 'ajax/contactSearch.php',
        data: ({ fname: $("#fname").val(), lname: $("#lname").val(), city: $("#city").val(), state: $("#state").val() }),
        success: function(d) {
            var obj = JSON.parse( d );
            if(obj.result != 0){
            $("#contactSearch").remove();
            $("#button-wrapper").before('<div id="contactSearch">'+obj.result+'</div>');
            $("#contactSearch").slideToggle('slow');                                
          } else {
            forceSubmitForm = true;
            $('#purchaser_contact').submit(); // Form will submit
          }
        }
      });   

      return false;

  } //END IF empty id

});     

This won't work until the submit button is pushed a second time (ie, $('#purchaser_contact').submit(); is not submitting the form).

EDIT This never did work for me but Simeon's answer is the closest and he claims it works in all major browsers so if it helps someone, great.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is the solution you are looking for.

var forceSubmitForm = false;
$('#myForm').submit(function(){
    if(forceSubmitForm) return true;
    $.ajax({
        // ...
        success: function(data){
            if(data.entry != 'OK'){ // or whatever check
                forceSubmitForm = true;
                $('#myForm').submit(); // Form will submit
            }else{
                // Form will not be submitted
            }
        }
    });
    return false;
});

EDIT To prove to myself that this methodology works, I just created a sample page with a form and a submit button. This worked fine in all major browsers:

$(function(){ // On DOM ready
    var forceSubmitForm = false;

    $('#purchaser_contact').live('submit', function() {
        if (forceSubmitForm){
            alert('submitting');
            return true;
        }

        // A callback function works in the same manner as a timeout

        setTimeout(function(){
            forceSubmitForm = true;
            $('#purchaser_contact').submit();
        }, 1500); // Submit after 1,5 seconds

        return false; // Do not submit immediately
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
@Simeon this is close but requires a second click on the submit button if the ajax call doesn't return a match. I want it to submit the form automatically if there's no match (which I think was your intention). –  jay Apr 14 '10 at 15:01
    
Of course you have to edit the code in the success function to fit your needs... I put a comment there: "or whatever check" and showed you how to do this. But if you don't have any knowledge of these matters I could write edit the answer, using your specifically current code in the other question. –  Simeon Apr 14 '10 at 15:10
    
The check isn't the issue. Your solution doesn't work even if I apply my own check. $('#myForm').submit() will NOT submit the form because it doesn't pass your forceSubmitForm value properly. –  jay Apr 14 '10 at 15:14
    
Yes it does. It sets forceSubmitForm = true, and that makes the form submit immediately when .submit() is called the next time. Look at the first row in the submit function, it returns true when called if the forceSubmitForm variable is set to true. –  Simeon Apr 14 '10 at 15:20
    
I so badly want it to work. Sadly it does not until a second click is made on the submit button. –  jay Apr 14 '10 at 15:24

Here's is jQuery example (not tested):

$(function() {
    $("#myForm").submit(function() {
        $.post(/* make AJAX request */ function() {
            if (/* similar entry does not exisits */) {
                 $("#myForm").data("allow-submit", true).submit();
            } else {
                 alert('NOT ALLOWED!');
            }
        });

        return $(this).data("allow-submit") || false; // prevent form submit if not allowed
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this option. the .data() isn't available to me until a second click on the submit button is made. –  jay Apr 14 '10 at 15:06
    
Can you see a way to avoid the second click on the submit button? I like this solution if that's the case. –  jay Apr 14 '10 at 15:11

Essentially, you want to run a function when the form is submitted and then short circuit the form action if your function is negative. Something like this should do:

$("form#myForm").submit(function(){
    if(someCustomFunction()){//do the check
            event.preventDefault; //short circuit
            someOtherCustomFunction();//display your alternative

    }
});
share|improve this answer

You can process the form by adding a callback function to the submit event. If you want to stop the submit from going through you can preventDefault() on the event or return false.

$('form').submit(function(event) {
   event.preventDefault();

   //do stuff, you can put your ajax call here
   ...

   if(fail) { return false; }
   else { return true; }
});
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't what was asked for. The pass or fail functions need to happen as a result of the ajax success callback. –  jay Apr 14 '10 at 15:03

This was driving me nuts and no solutions were working, it would either not submit the form or go into an infinite loop submitting the form. So I just turned the submit button into a regular button. Then submitted the form within the ajax loop. This means you don't have to worry about stopping the default action of the submit button as it's just a regular button.

<form id="loginForm" method="post" action="login.php">
<input type="text" name="username" id="username">
<input type="button" value="Log in" id="btnDoSomething">
</form>

And the Javascript/jQuery:

$("#btnDoSomething").click(function() {

    var request = $.ajax({
        data: {username: $("#username").val()},
        dataType: 'json',
        success: function(data)
        {
            // when response is returned do stuff then submit form
            // ...
            $("#loginForm").submit();
        },
        url: 'ajax-check-username.php'
    });
});

Also if the user hits the Enter key you'd want to do the ajax request then submit as well, so this code snippet is handy as well:

// If they hit the enter button, run the same method
$('#loginForm').bind('keypress', function(e)
{
    if (e.keyCode == 13)
    {
        $(this).find("#btnDoSomething").click();
    }
});

Works perfectly!

share|improve this answer

I know I'm necro-ing an old thread but I recently came across this problem and thought I'd throw in an answer for anyone else who stumbles upon this thread. My solution was to make the $.ajax call synchronous.

This is what worked for me:

var formShouldSubmit = false;
$("form#my_form").bind("submit", function(){
     $.ajax({
        url: "my_form_validate.php",
        data: $(this).serialize(),
        success: function(data){
            if ( data.valid ){
                formShouldSubmit = true;
            }
            else{
                $("#error").html('Invalid entry');
            }
        },
        async: false,
        dataType: "json"
    });
    if ( !formShouldSubmit ){
        return false;
    }
});
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