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So I have nice OCaml code (50000 lines). I want to port it to C. So Is there any free OCaml to C translator?

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2  
Why would you want to do that? I'm sure there are better ways to do whatever you're doing. –  tiftik Apr 14 '10 at 15:27
    
Oh... No there are no other ways... (by hand is one but let's skeep it) I need C code to compile it using some tool called Adobe Alchemy for Adobe Flash player... So I will get 10-200x speed loss but it steel will be faster than code compiled from pure ActionScript... Main Idea - make an application run inside web page even if it is slow in it... –  Rella Apr 14 '10 at 15:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This probably isn't what you want, but you can get the OCaml compiler to dump its runtime code in C:

ocamlc -output-obj -o foo.c foo.ml

What you get is basically a static dump of the bytecode. The result will look something like:

#include <caml/mlvalues.h>
CAMLextern void caml_startup_code(
           code_t code, asize_t code_size,
           char *data, asize_t data_size,
           char *section_table, asize_t section_table_size,
           char **argv);
static int caml_code[] = {
0x00000054, 0x000003df, 0x00000029, 0x0000002a, 0x00000001, 0x00000000, 
/* ... */
}

static char caml_data[] = {
132, 149, 166, 190, 0, 0, 3, 153, 0, 0, 0, 118, 
/* ... */
};

static char caml_sections[] = {
132, 149, 166, 190, 0, 0, 21, 203, 0, 0, 0, 117, 
/* ... */
};

/* ... */

void caml_startup(char ** argv)
{
    caml_startup_code(caml_code, sizeof(caml_code),
                      caml_data, sizeof(caml_data),
                      caml_sections, sizeof(caml_sections),
                      argv);
}

You can compile it with

gcc -L/usr/lib/ocaml foo.c -lcamlrun -lm -lncurses

For more information, see the OCaml manual.

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and you can compile this code using C compiler (gcc for ex)? –  Rella Apr 14 '10 at 21:28
    
Sure, why not? Info added above. –  Chris Conway Apr 15 '10 at 4:31
    
Grate, but how now for example call functions from my OCaml library from C? (I know crapy way of calling OCaml library from C but in order to port it I need to be able not only to nest OCaml lib into C but be able to call its functions from C) –  Rella Apr 15 '10 at 5:19

The OCamlJS project would be a good starting point. It compiles OCaml to JavaScript; it should be possible to modify it to compile OCaml to ActionScript. Compiling to C would probably be more work - no garbage collection of any kind - but not impossible, particularly if Adobe Alchemy provides APIs to meet some of those needs.

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If I had some OCaml code I wanted to run client-side "in the browser" (which seems to be your intent based on comments with the question), I have to say my first thought would be to do one of

  • Use something like OcamlJava to compile OCaml to java bytecode and deploy that using Java web start or similar.
  • Port to F# (Microsoft version of OCaml) running on .NET and use whatever MS provides to web-deploy that.

And maybe if I was really crazy:

  • Port the OCaml interpreter (which I believe is implemented in 'C') to Flash using Alchemy and have it run the OCaml bytecode of my original (unported) code.

A two-stage OCaml-to-C, C-to-Flash doesn't really appeal though.

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There is an OCaml bytecode executable file to C source code compiler: https://github.com/ocaml-bytes/ocamlcc

So, first compile your code to a bytecode executable then use ocamlcc.

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